sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 02:56 pm
Marc Ambinder:

Quote:
A few [Republican political strategists he talked to] are cautiously optimistic that it'll turn out OK, but most of the strategists and consultants I've spoken to, e-mailed with, or read/watched are struggling with it. They expect her to have a good week... and then to crash and burn when she hits the campaign trail as scrutiny catches up with her.

Some of these strategists are close to those Republicans who were vetted but not picked, but many of them aren't. "It's like playing poker blind," one strategist said. Another e-mailed: "Obama's lack of readiness was THE only way to win." When these Republicans ask the McCain campaign for guidance, all they hear back is: "She's more experienced than Obama is."
0 Replies
 
gustavratzenhofer
 
  3  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 02:57 pm
http://l.yimg.com/a/i/ww/news/2008/08/28/mccain-palin.jpg

I'm sorry, but this does absolutely nothing for me.
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 02:58 pm
@maporsche,
Nah, it's a good argument spelled right or not.

The more I think about it, the happier I am with McCain's choice. Truly. For I don't think she will have much affect at all in the long run, and I think that he opens himself up to some problems by picking her. He basically just negated his major argument against Obama, something which will not go unnoticed; she is not very attractive to moderate voters (at least in her positions); and I don't know how well she will match up with Biden. And most importantly, I think this scandal that she's tied up in is going to receive a large injection of national attention, and that has a way of changing things, doesn't it?

It's a long shot by McCain and yaknow what? It's good when your opponent is forced to take long shots. It's really good.

Cycloptichorn
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:03 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

.................
It's a long shot by McCain and yaknow what? It's good when your opponent is forced to take long shots. It's really good.

Cycloptichorn


Cycl - what is the origin of this alleged military doctrine of long shots?
edgarblythe
 
  5  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:04 pm
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee307/edgarblythe/mccain.jpg

http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee307/edgarblythe/gidgetgoes.jpg
maporsche
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:05 pm
@gustavratzenhofer,
gustavratzenhofer wrote:

http://l.yimg.com/a/i/ww/news/2008/08/28/mccain-palin.jpg

I'm sorry, but this does absolutely nothing for me.


She's got it going on....no doubt.

I'm hot for teacher.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:08 pm
@High Seas,
A lifetime of experience watching both politics, and football Laughing

It's a sign of weakness on McCain's part. And a weak pick overall. How long do you think it will be before we have the guy she had fired in a commercial? When the national reporters start snooping around, you really think more details about her investigation and scandal aren't going to come out?

Risky, risky...

Cycloptichorn
Debra Law
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:11 pm
@edgarblythe,
ROFL

This is such a McCain boner, there is nothing left to do but poke fun.

ROFL
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  3  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:12 pm
Quote:
An Astonishingly Arrogant V.P. Selection

It may be John McCain's birthday, but it seems like he's the one giving out gifts today. The selection of Palin doesn't simply, as others have pointed out, undermine the notion that Obama is too inexperienced to be president; it gives Obama the chance to actually take the edge on national security while making John McCain's age a central issue of the campaign.

Whatever the political calculations involved in picking a veep, the most important qualification for the vice presidency is the ability to assume the presidency in a crisis. Given that of the last 12 presidents, three have either died or resigned, this is hardly a hypothetical consideration--in fact, given that McCain is 72, it is a very real consideration. Harry Truman, Lyndon Johnson, and Gerald Ford all faced multiple foreign policy crises immediately upon assuming office, whether it was the onset of the Cold War, the North's invasion of South Korea, the Vietnam War, or the withering of détente and the resulting increase in nuclear tension with the Soviet Union. The next president will have to finish the denuclearization of North Korea; prevent the nuclearization of Iran; organize a departure from Iraq that maintains some level of stability; defeat a resurgent Taliban in Afghanistan; establish, nurture, and make the most of a relationship with Pakistan's new leaders; and confront a revanchist Russia while preserving and enhancing its cooperation on nonproliferation and climate change--to say nothing of working with India, China, or our allies.

Could Sarah Palin conceivably manage this task? Her tenure as a small-town mayor and Alaska governor has given her no foreign policy experience whatsoever. True, Obama has little foreign policy experience either, as McCain and others have pointed out again and again. But during his time in national office he has demonstrated a clear commitment to the most pressing issues in American foreign policy. Take nuclear proliferation. Early in his tenure on the Foreign Relations Committee, Obama joined Richard Lugar's efforts to secure weapons of mass destruction in the former Soviet Union. Obama's first trip abroad as senator was to Russia and Ukraine to learn more about those efforts firsthand. In 2007, he cosponsored legislation with Senator Chuck Hagel calling for ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty and negotiation of a fissile material cut-off treaty. And he was the first major presidential candidate to embrace the steps laid out in 2007 by Sam Nunn, Bill Perry, George Shultz, and Henry Kissinger through which the United States would fight nuclear terrorism, reinvigorate the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, and ultimately eliminate nuclear weapons.

Perhaps more important than the experience they embodied, these efforts demonstrate that Obama has a worldview. Obama recognizes the greatness and uniqueness of the United States, but he does not translate that exceptionalism into dominance or isolationism as conservatives often have. Instead, he sees it as the basis for U.S. leadership. He has laid out that worldview in myriad speeches and articles, and he has surrounded himself with pragmatists who have a record of translating that understanding of America's role into concrete gains for our national security. By contrast, there is no indication that Palin has even shades of a foreign policy worldview; a Nexis search doesn't turn up a single article that she has written on international affairs.

McCain undoubtedly thinks he has his national security bases covered; picking Palin shows that, unlike Obama, he doesn't need an eminence grise like Biden to add heft to his ticket. But surely McCain recognizes that Palin may have to fill his shoes someday. By choosing her anyway, he has demonstrated hubris well beyond anything Obama has displayed on his most arrogant day: a belief that he can master unforeseen circumstances, physical and otherwise, that are well beyond his control. This is insulting and dangerous and suggests that McCain may want to think twice before accusing Obama of putting his personal ambition ahead of the national interest.

No doubt Michelle is right that the Obama-Biden team will have to be careful attacking Palin's frighteningly thin resume and tenuous grasp of foreign policy. But surely a campaign that has been charged with being too naïve to manage rogue state dictators can have a bit of fun with the idea that a one-time Miss Congeniality could effectively face down Vladimir Putin, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, or Kim Jong Il. Surely, Obama's "eight is enough" quip ought to apply not only to President Bush's economic and foreign policy travesties, but to the elevation of mediocrity that has characterized his appointment of Michael Brown to FEMA and his nomination of Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court. And surely we can agree that if the McCain campaign was desperate to transparently court voters put off by Hillary Clinton's loss, there is no dearth of women with far greater intellectual, executive, and political abilities--abilities that would allow them to assume the presidency in a heartbeat.

--Peter Scoblic


http://blogs.tnr.com/tnr/blogs/the_plank/archive/2008/08/29/an-astonishingly-arrogant-v-p-selection.aspx

Cycloptichorn
kickycan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:22 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
The 'wackjobs' tend to show up with their votes.


Very true. Hopefully the young voters show up in droves to cancel them out.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:23 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
"And surely we can agree that if the McCain campaign was desperate to transparently court voters put off by Hillary Clinton's loss, there is no dearth of women with far greater intellectual, executive, and political abilities--abilities that would allow them to assume the presidency in a heartbeat."

--Peter Scoblic

This is precisely the sentiment that Mr B (a McCain supporter to date) expressed while listening to Ms Palin today.
High Seas
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:25 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

A lifetime of experience watching both politics, and football Laughing
..........


Still not enough experience since you conflate a "long shot" and a "Hail Mary pass"! Have a good weekend.
Ticomaya
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:28 pm
@gustavratzenhofer,
gustavratzenhofer wrote:
http://l.yimg.com/a/i/ww/news/2008/08/28/mccain-palin.jpg

I'm sorry, but this does absolutely nothing for me.


Check your pulse, gus.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:30 pm
@High Seas,
I've seen that idea elsewhere, specifically in terms of Mondale and Ferraro. He was behind, he knew it, he tried something big and bold and attention-getting -- didn't work out too well for him.
0 Replies
 
OCCOM BILL
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:38 pm
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:
It sways them to show that McCain is not a male chauvinist pig like Barack Obama, considering the disgraceful, humiliating way that Barack treated Hillary.
Shocked Where does this demented point of view come from? What was disgraceful? What was humiliating? Being the candidate (while being male) that Americans narrowly liked better makes him a male chauvinist pig? Explain this bout with idiocy or let it stand as the simple bout with idiocy that it is.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:43 pm
@Ticomaya,
Well, she's no Eric Cantor, that's for sure Smile

Cycloptichorn
squinney
 
  5  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:44 pm
My take, for what it's worth:

1. Who? ... Oh. But she's only been a governor for less than two years.

2. She has a down syndrom baby. Before you take that as sexist or discriminatory, hear me out. A baby requires a lot of attention. A handicapped baby requires even more. She is comfortable with having her husband be home with the baby and taking care of the house. That is a rather liberal stance, seeing women as equals at work and a man as a man even if he's wearing an apron, no? CERTAINLY NOT far right, christian conservative values. So, I'm missing where she draws votes from christians, conservative women or men.

3. Along the same line of thinking, she doesn't garner the support or self identification from stay at home moms. How can she understand them?

4. This one may seem petty, but plays to peoples visual perceptions... Her hair style (and Cindy's) is right out of 1965. Progressive women, Hillary's Traveling Pantsuit group, will NOT vote for someone that looks like she will set women back 50 years.

5. Her stance on abortion rights will not draw Hillary, moderate or left votes.

6. She doesn't draw any minority votes I can think of... black, hispanic, cuban, etc.

7. She may be a lifetime member of the NRA, but you can believe there is a large population of guys out there (that identify with McCain), who think "...for the love of God, the womans s'posed to cook the meat not hunt it down!" Those that think it's sexy for her to shoot a gun, also want to pat her on the butt and send her back to the kitchen, NOT to the White House.

8. McCain is 72, and had two rounds with cancer. I can't imagine her being ready to be president if, godforbid, something happened to McCain on January 22nd, 2009, or any time in the first couple of years. At least Obama knows the heads of other countries. Hell, he had one of King Abdullah personally drive him to the airport.

That gets most of my initial impressions. I really don't get the selection of her for VP unless McCains realizing he doesn't really have it in him to be president but has to keep going through the motions since it is so late in the game.
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:48 pm
@squinney,
Good post Squinney.

But, uh-oh. I just heard something very troubling: Palin has invoked Alaska's version of Executive priviledge in order to keep emails relating to her abuse of power investigation out of the hands of investigators.

...

Now, who does that sound like to you?

Bad, bad choice McCain. There's a reason you actually vet someone before you choose them. We are going to have a field day with this.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
Ramafuchs
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:48 pm
@JPB,
The GOP seems to think women will eagerly vote for any ticket that includes a member of their gender. That's Republican tokenism and pandering at its worst.

Palin's addition to the ticket takes Republican faux-feminism to a whole new level. As Adam Serwer pointed out on TAPPED, this is in fact a condescending move by the GOP. It plays to the assumption that disaffected Hillary Clinton supporters did not care about her politics -- only her gender. In picking Palin, Republicans are lending credence to the sexist assumption that women voters are too stupid to investigate or care about the issues, and merely want to vote for someone who looks like them. As Serwer noted, it's akin to choosing Alan Keyes in an attempt to compete with Obama for votes from black Americans.

http://www.prospect.org/cs/articles?article=mccains_sexist_vp_pick
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 03:50 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:
Well, she's no Eric Cantor, that's for sure Smile

Cycloptichorn

No, she's not, but I'm pleased with his selection nonetheless.
0 Replies
 
 

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