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A Vice Presidental candidate thread.

 
 
Reply Thu 5 Jun, 2008 12:13 pm
I was reading O'Bill's thread "Is it time for Obama to choose a running mate" thread and figured it might be a good idea to have a thread dedicated to some of the potential running mates.

Wes Clark:
-He's pro-affirmative action, pro-choice, pro-education, pro-health care.
-Thinks the Democratic party stands for "internationalism", "ordinary men and women", and "fair play".

In his 2004 Presidential run he:
-Called for a repeal of recent Bush tax cuts for people earning more than $200,000
-suggested providing healthcare for the uninsured by altering the current system rather than transferring to a completely new universal health care system.
-Backed environmental causes promising to reverse "scaled down rules" the Bush administration had applied to the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts and dealing with global warming by reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
-He proposed a global effort to strengthen American relations with other nations
-Advocated reviewing the Patriot Act, and called to invest $100 billion in homeland security.
-Put out a budget plan that claimed to save $2.35 trillion over ten years through a repeal of the Bush tax cuts, sharing the cost of the Iraq War with other nations, and cutting government waste.

Source

Quote:
Anyone seeking to understand the bloody fiasco of the Serbian war need hardly look further than the person of the beribboned Supreme Allied Commander, General Wesley K. Clark. Politicians and journalists are generally according him a respectful hearing as he discourses on the "schedule" for the destruction of Serbia, tellingly embracing phrases favored by military bureaucrats such as "systematic" and "methodical".

Full Article

Quote:
General Wesley K. Clark (USAR Ret.) was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University from August of 1966 until 1968, studying Philosophy,
Politics and Economics. Upon receiving his Master's Degree he entered
the military in 1968 in order to fight in Vietnam
.
Following a distinguished career in the United States Army he retired
in 2000. He became the author of a number of articles, speeches and
books....
------------
From June of 2000 until February of 2002, Clark worked for Little
Rock-based Stephens Group Inc. as a corporate consultant to help
develop emerging-technology companies and as managing director of
merchant banking.

Full Article

Quote:

Striving to be a reformer, Clark has (justifiably) attacked corporations seeking tax breaks by moving their headquarters from the US to Bermuda and other off-shore locations. But just last year, when he was a director at Stephens Investment Co., they bought 75,000 shares of Tyco Corporation which did exactly that. (The investment has paid off well, too, as their stock has risen substantially since the purchase.)

Source
------------------------

I am curious why Clark is considered to be someone Obama would/should consider. He seems to adequately toe the Democratic party line--being pro-things that matter to democrats...but he seems to have (to a lesser degree than the Clintons) a strong big business connection, and worse, connections to defense related industries.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 29 • Views: 23,476 • Replies: 519

 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 09:52 am
I thought this was interesting, from First Read:

Quote:
From NBC's Chuck Todd and Domenico Montanaro

So you think you know who's on Obama's veep short list? Well, think again. According to sources on the Hill, Obama veep vetters -- specifically Jim Johnson and Eric Holder -- have been asking Dem members of Congress this week their input about potential running mates. The conversations are free-flowing but one name the vetters are inserting in the conversations is one that is not a household name... Ret. Gen. James Jones, the former Marine-turned-NATO Supreme Allied Commander.

Jones, a Vietnam vet born in Kansas City, MO (swing state alert!), was a career military officer rising to one of the highest posts possible. Now retired, Jones has been critical of the number of troops currently in Afghanistan. He's been appointed to independent posts by both the Democratic Congress and the Republican-run State Department

Jones currently is the president and CEO of the Institute for 21st Century Energy, which is an affiliate of the US Chamber of Commerce, not exactly the type of organization a typical Democrat gets involved with. Potentially problematic is that he's on Chevron's board. He also serves on the boards of Boeing and Invacare, a manufacturer and distributor of medical equipment. (Invacare's slogan, ironically, is: "Yes, you can.")

Being the least known potential veep, it shouldn't be surprising that the vetters have to spend more time on him in their various conversations on the Hill. But the fact that he's being, um, added to the very long short list, is an interesting development.

Besides Jones, the other names on the list bandied about with congressional Dems include (and not in any order): Hillary Clinton, John Kerry, John Edwards, Evan Bayh, Kathleen Sebelius, Ted Strickland, Mark Warner, Tim Kaine, Jim Webb, Bill Nelson, Jack Reed, Joe Biden, Chris Dodd, Tom Daschle, and Sam Nunn. You'll notice a few names NOT on this list (that's not my exclusion -- hint hint). Besides Jones, I'm told the two other names that invited extended discussion were Biden and Strickland.

Take this chatter for what it is -- chatter. But the addition of Jones to your semi-official veep short list is truly a fascinating development.


http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/

Jones is totally new to me and therefore I don't have a real opinion yet. The board thing seems possibly problematic.

Of the rest, Strickland, Biden, Dodd, Bayh, and Daschle are most interesting to me, I think. (In roughly descending order. I like Strickland for the Hillary aspect -- Hillary link but not actually Hillary -- the Ohio aspect [turn Ohio blue!], the fact that I like him as a Governor [I voted for him], and the executive experience aspect. I like Biden for his experience, his ability to be an attack dog [his quip about Giuliani and 9-11 didn't single-handedly torpedo Rudy's presidential bid but really didn't help], and his intelligence.)
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 09:56 am
Quote:
"Rudy Giuliani. There's only three things he mentions in a sentence -- a noun, a verb, and 9/11. There's nothing else! There's nothing else! And I mean this sincerely. He's genuinely not qualified to be president."


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2007/10/30/biden-rudys-sentences-c_n_70509.html
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 11:39 am
I've been uneasy about Webb. This article makes me even more uneasy:

"Anyone But Webb" by Timothy Noah
http://www.slate.com/id/2193217/
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 11:55 am
Yeah... I have always been uneasy about him too (although I relished his trouncing of George "Macaca" Allen who not too long ago was a favorite for Republican presidential nominee).

After reading your article Soz... a Clinton/Webb ticket might have been interesting. I hope Obama stays away.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 01:31 pm
Agreed, ebrown.



I am not Ezra Klein, I swear (hey Ezra, have you been reading A2K)?

"Veepstakes: The case for Biden" by Ezra Klein
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 03:10 pm
And now Sibelius interests me (besides just liking the name, Sibelius):

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/06/10/kathleen-sebelius-complet_n_106219.html


Kathleen Sebelius, Completing The Obama Puzzle
Sam Stein
June 10, 2008 10:20 AM


When weighing Kathleen Sebelius' potential as a possible vice presidential pick for Barack Obama, it's useful to consider two separate instances when the Kansas Governor confronted President George W. Bush.

In May 2007, after a devastating tornado had wiped out the town of Greensburg, Sebelius was quick to highlight one of the unspoken truths of the recovery episode: Kansas lacked the resources and manpower it needed because much of the state's National Guard resources had been sent to Iraq. Going public, she repeatedly took jabs at Bush, scolding his Iraq policies for creating a readiness gap at home. Her rebukes earned her accolades in Kansas and with the press. It also prompted the scorn of several Bush lackeys -- a not-too-unfortunate wrist slapping for an emerging Democratic official.


Less than a year later, Sebelius' national stature landed her in another prime-time position, again opposite the president. This time, however, her task was far more thankless. Asked to give the response to Bush's final State of the Union address, Sebelius stumbled, offering up what observers deemed a fairly safe, some said milquetoast, address.


Taken together, these two Bush-related episodes could be considered the polar ends of the Kathleen Sebelius experience. To be fair, the median of the Kansas governor's attributes lie definitively closer to the person who eagerly challenged George Bush's war policies. Indeed, with Obama beginning the arduous process of choosing his number two, Sebelius -- who, sources say, enjoys a warm relationship with Obama and would take the job -- presents a heap of electoral promise but with small but significant question marks.


The daughter of the former governor of Ohio, Sebelius rose steadily in the political ranks, winning six straight elections before taking over the governor's chair in 2002 and being reelected four years later. A progressive Democrat in a predominantly Republican state, she achieved remarkable favorability ratings while holding positions traditionally anathema in Kansas -- mainly by keeping focus on bread-and-butter issues.


"By and large, she's a moderate Democrat, truly pro-business, and able to convey a legitimate sense of being a competent administrator (which she is)," Burdett Loomis, a former Sebelius aide and professor of politics at the University of Kansas, said in an email. "She does exceedingly well in forums like Chambers of Commerce talks, where she exudes common sense and competence, while still maintaining core Democratic values -- education, health care, and sympathy for unions."


More often than not, Sebelius has harnessed legislative consensus for her agenda. In a special session in 2005, she was handed a budgetary bombshell when the state's Supreme Court ordered the government to provide $500 million for school funding (Kansas' budget is roughly $12 billion). Discussions went on for days in the legislature, with talk of impeachment of the justices surfacing. Sebelius stood behind the court, and recruited a slim majority of lawmakers to her side. Funds were passed for the schools and three years later the program is regarded as a success.


"She brings people together and gets things done," said Raj Goyle, a first term state representative. "Governor Sebelius has a unique record of reaching across traditional party lines in Kansas to build consensus."


But when she felt it necessary, Sebelius fought -- and often won. She vetoed a bill that would have required voters to show photo identification before voting, citing disenfranchisement concerns. She issued an executive order making it illegal to discriminate against state employees on the basis of sexual orientation. Three times in four years, she opposed legislation that would have restricted abortion access even though one of those bills passed the Kansas legislature by a two to one margin. Most recently, Sebelius offered a third veto to a bill that would have paved the way for the construction of two new coal-fired units in western Kansas, and she did it primarily on environmental grounds, a stance that a decade ago would have amounted to political suicide.


"Elected leaders are supposed to look at the big picture, at issues that may not affect citizens immediately but are extremely beneficial to the long-term condition of our society. Moving toward renewable energy provides opportunities for better-paying jobs, while helping to address concerns caused by global warming," she said of her decision.

Her position was held up by one vote in the statehouse.


"The coal industry thought that if there was one state it could buy off, it would be Kansas," said one legislator close to Sebelius. "She obviously made an incredibly risky decision to deny the permits. And never before in history had coal plant been rejected on environmental grounds."


And yet, despite the dug-in heels and the close-fought battles, Sebelius' standing has risen. In 2005, she was named by Time magazine one of the five best governors in America, lauded for eliminating a $1.1 billion debt without raising taxes. Her approval ratings, meanwhile, hover over 60 percent. Officials at the Democratic Governors Association -- which Sebelius chaired in 2007 -- repeatedly raved about her work ethic.


The Bush confrontation was emblematic of how Sebelius has curried broad support. After tornadoes hit six southwest Kansas counties, killing thirteen, Sebelius publicly declared that National Guard shortages "will just make it [recovery] that much slower." The White House responded by first putting the blame at her feet, saying it was "not aware of any prior complaints" about a lack of personnel or equipment, and then suggesting that the governor had been in New Orleans, listening to jazz, when the storm hit. Neither were true. Sebelius had made at least five separate requests for equipment, beginning in Dec. 2005, and, on the day of the storm, she had been visiting family before immediately returning to the state.


According to a source close to Sebelius, the governor didn't take lightly to the smears. During a visit to the tornado site with the president, she reportedly continued to hammer away with her guard complaints. Kansans of all political stripes loved it.


"People were supportive of her and those comments," said Tim Owens, a Republican legislator. "I'm a retired army colonel and I will tell you, I think she is right... I'm not very happy about the way the federal government went about dealing with the National Guard in regards to the war in Iraq."


Being a successful Democrat in a Republican state, showing an ability to reach blue-collar voters, and demonstrating a tenacity to challenge the Bush administration, has vaulted Sebelius into any honest discussion of Obama's veepstakes. Sharing a good relationship with the Illinois Democrat and endorsing him fairly early in the primary cycle didn't hurt either. But Sebelius also has blind spots on her political resume that even her most ardent supporters acknowledge.

The most superficial is her State of the Union response, a speech that detractors say is evidence that she can't handle the national stage, but, her office claims, was merely a product of divergent expectations.


"Governor Sebelius believes there is a time and place for everything, but she saw that time as an opportunity not to focus necessarily on the Democratic message or the Republican message, but the American message," said her press secretary Nicole Corcoran. "Governor Sebelius has tangled with the White House before and will again if needed, but the response to the State of the Union message was not the time for it."


A far more substantive concern with Sebelius could be that she doesn't provide what Obama truly needs. As governor, she has had limited direct national security experience. And a recent Survey USA poll showed that, even with her as vice president, Obama still wouldn't carry Kansas (and its six electoral college votes) in the general election.


"She can't deliver her own state," said Christian Morgan, executive director for the Kansas Republican Party. "Moreover, she has never dealt with the national issues that a vice president has to talk about. She has no idea how military budgets work, or what it is like to be a commander in chief."


Because of these concerns, Loomis, who worked in a communications capacity for Sebelius, put the governor's vice presidential prospects at "no better than one in ten," calling her a conservative choice. But he added, should she be tapped, Sebelius would be a tireless campaigner and could very well translate her appeal in Kansas onto the national stage.


"As someone who has watched lots of politicians closely for almost four decades," he said, "I find there are two types -- the ones that look worse when you see them close up, and the ones that look better. Kathleen Sebelius is definitely the latter."

end quote



Well, I'm mixed on unions myself. Sometimes have been for, sometimes not, as in an on-going fracas in Oregon re beef raising. Anyway, I'm glad to know more about her and will keep reading.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 03:58 pm
Thanks, Osso, that was interesting. I like her, not sure about the two firsts aspect (first black president, first female vice president) (Ferraro was on the ticket but didn't win/ hold the office), and not sure if she has enough experience.

Meanwhile, Strickland is evidently NOT interested in being veep. No, really.

Quote:
ABC News' Teddy Davis and John Santucci Report: Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland (D) was Shermanesque on Tuesday in saying that he would "absolutely not" be Sen. Barack Obama's, D-Ill., running mate even if asked to join the Democratic ticket.

Asked on NPR's "All Things Considered" if he is auditioning to be Obama's running mate, Strickland said, "Absolutely not. If drafted I will not run, nominated I will not accept and if elected I will not serve.

So, I don't know how more crystal clear I can be."


http://blogs.abcnews.com/politicalradar/2008/06/oh-guv-shermane.html
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 04:39 pm
Yeh, I don't know about that either.

I hadn't gotten to reading about Strickland and he's gone.. oh, well, I'll read anyway, just to know more.
0 Replies
 
Centroles
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 04:42 pm
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 04:45 pm
I have a soft spot for Bloomberg but I need to read more. I remember Blatham has - or had - short shrift for him. He might be hawk-y for me, but that might be a positive for election.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 04:47 pm
Anyone looked at Jane Harmon? She's to my right, but most are.
0 Replies
 
fishin
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 06:00 pm
ossobuco wrote:
I have a soft spot for Bloomberg but I need to read more. I remember Blatham has - or had - short shrift for him. He might be hawk-y for me, but that might be a positive for election.


Centroles is glossing up Bloomberg more than he deserves. For example, the crime rate in NYC has dropped every year since it hit it's peak in 1991. While he's giving Bloomberg credit for a 30% drop in crime the fact is that it dropped 75% between 1991 and 2004 - a point at which Bloomberg had only been in office for two years. The people that study crime trends credit the drop to increases in the number of police on the streets which started with Dinkins and was carried on by Guilluni before Bloomberg ever came into office.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 06:43 pm
Got that, Fishin, and understood that already, not to be snarky but that I mildly follow urban matters. I see he has some level of business competence, or seems to, to me, raised with no business clue. (I had a rich uncle, but that was probably sheer luck on his part, looking back from this far.)

Tangent - would that I could talk with my family in the teens, twenties, thirties, forties, now.

I have read about Bloomberg some, but not retained it all. I think he might have a tendency to operate from on high. We don't need more of that in the vice presidency.
0 Replies
 
blueflame1
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2008 06:45 pm
Jim Webb on The Daily Show
June 09, 2008
link
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jun, 2008 02:56 pm
Whew, Bobby Jindal from LA - maybe not such a great choice for VP for McCain.

Quote:
We've discovered that in an essay Jindal wrote in 1994 for the New Oxford Review, a serious right-wing Catholic journal, Jindal narrated a bizarre story of a personal encounter with a demon, in which he participated in an exorcism with a group of college friends. And not only did they cast out the supernatural spirit that had possessed his friend, Jindal wrote that he believes that their ritual may well have cured her cancer.


http://tpmelectioncentral.talkingpointsmemo.com/2008/06/bobby_jindals_dance_with_the_d.php

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jun, 2008 05:30 pm
Already!

Quote:
Twenty-two percent say that adding Clinton as Obama's vice presidential running mate makes them more likely to vote for Obama in November; 21 percent say it makes them less likely to vote for him; and 55 percent say it makes no difference.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25096620/

(NBC/WSJ poll.)

So there is a whopping 1% net benefit if Obama chooses Clinton as VP.

I'm starting to be reassured that it's not going to happen.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Jun, 2008 05:34 pm
ossobuco wrote:
Anyone looked at Jane Harmon? She's to my right, but most are.


You commie, you! (scandalized!)
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2008 06:06 pm
I read that Ms Sibellius, a 6 to 1 chance in the betting, is a Catholic and pro-choice.

Can anybody explain that for me?
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Jul, 2008 06:18 pm
Charlie Crist just got married!

Good grief.

This is like something out of Hollywood circa 1953.

NOW he can be McCain's VP -- maybe.


http://www.tampabay.com/news/politics/state/article659439.ece
0 Replies
 
 

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