15
   

Aspirin a Day Can Kill

 
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Sun 23 Jan, 2011 03:16 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Its a fact Dave, meds rely upon developing a "Titer" which, once achieved can only do one of two things
1promote elimination (like vitamins in excess)

2 They can cause severe reactions like bleeding (If you took, like 2 aspirins every hour to achieve and overload the titer, youu could cause internal bleeding or a special kind of hematoma stroke.

CaN i HAVE YOUR S&W 50 CAL?
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Sun 23 Jan, 2011 03:26 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Its a fact Dave, meds rely upon developing a "Titer" which,
once achieved can only do one of two things
1promote elimination (like vitamins in excess)
I 've had that happen with perspiration.



farmerman wrote:
2 They can cause severe reactions like bleeding (If you took, like 2 aspirins every hour to achieve and overload the titer, youu could cause internal bleeding or a special kind of hematoma stroke.
I 've cut way down on the aspirin.


farmerman wrote:
CaN i HAVE YOUR S&W 50 CAL?
I 've never had a .50 caliber handgun.
I 've heard that the recoil is triple that of a .44 magnum,
which is the most powerful handgun that I 've ever discharged (my Ruger Super Blackhawk)

I think .50 caliber might be dangerous.
farmerman
 
  1  
Sun 23 Jan, 2011 03:30 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
I 've never had a .50 caliber handgun.
I thought that you were going to buy a "Falcon"(? not sure of the model name). Did you deceide against it?

Ok, well, can I have yer 44 mag? I know youve got one of them bad boys
OmSigDAVID
 
  -1  
Sun 23 Jan, 2011 03:53 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Quote:
I 've never had a .50 caliber handgun.
I thought that you were going to buy a "Falcon"(? not sure of the model name). Did you deceide against it?

Ok, well, can I have yer 44 mag? I know youve got one of them bad boys
I don 't know that brand.
I have never considered acquiring a .50 caliber handgun.
I woud not use my .44 magnum for self defense,
except from animals, not in the city.
Once, at a gunnery range, I loaded alternating rounds
of .44 special and .44 magnum in my Super Blackhawk: THAT was an interesting experience,
every time a magnum round came up.

I 'll be using it for a while.





David
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  2  
Sun 23 Jan, 2011 05:37 pm
@Phoenix32890,
Quote:
The local cardio wanted to put me back on the Plavix, but it was so damned expensive, that I asked him if I could stay on the coumadin.


I checked into this further. Bristol-Meyers Squibb holds the patent on Clopidogrel (Plavix) until November 2011. Generic alternatives should be available after that.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Sun 23 Jan, 2011 10:50 pm
@JPB,
Quote:
I've been on Plavix since March. They told me then that it was scheduled to go generic within 6 months and the price should come down. Nothing yet, and if I have to pay full price once our COBRA runs out I'll be switching to a low-dose aspirin as well.


I would not hold my breath. I remember when my mother was on Prilosec, before it went generic. At the time, it cost her $135- month. It too was supposed to go generic. Then, the drug company decided that they needed to conduct more studies, which held up the generic for nearly another year.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Mon 24 Jan, 2011 05:05 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I'm not trying to browbeat you here, David, but i mentioned the plateau principle precisely because you said you were taking excedrin. From the Wikipedia article on excedrin:

Quote:
Excedrin is an over-the-counter headache pain reliever, typically in the form of tablets or caplets. It contains acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine. (emphasis added)


You should give serious consideration to reducing your intake of that product.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Mon 24 Jan, 2011 05:21 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
I'm not trying to browbeat you here, David,
I know that, Setanta.
Its very nice of u to take an interest.




Setanta wrote:
but i mentioned the plateau principle precisely because you said you were taking excedrin.
From the Wikipedia article on excedrin:
Quote:
Excedrin is an over-the-counter headache pain reliever,
typically in the form of tablets or caplets.
It contains acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine. (emphasis added)


Setanta wrote:
You should give serious consideration to reducing your intake of that product.
Yes; I will be mindful thereof. Thank u.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Tue 25 Jan, 2011 05:45 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:
Last week a very dear friend of mine was taken by ambulence to a hospital. She had suffered during one day with diahrea and vomiting. After friends had gotten her cleaned and comfortable, she told me she felt much better. But, she remained very weak. Some thought she was having a second stroke. With some people it may be hard to tell, particularly when the person is desperately seeking to avoid being taken to a hospital. At age 90, she confided to one friend, "I am afraid I will not come back."
Turns out she had been taking an aspirin a day. If I have the facts correct, she had been advised to take aspirin. But, the aspirin had caused internal bleeding and my friend had lost half of her blood. A doctor said that a half aspirin would have been fine. Apparently, she had misunderstood the recommended dosage. Tonight she is in her room with a bleeding ulcer the doctors have not been able to stop. If anybody is considering taking aspirin this way I hope they will consult a doctor first.
To me, it seems remarkable that there is so great a difference
in how 2 human beings react to the same stimulus.

In the quoted case, taking an aspirin per day was nearly fatal,
whereas during the 1980s and 1990s, there were many, many occasions
when I took around 7 or 8 Anacin pills at the same time,
with the same treatment repeated maybe 2 or 3 hours later and again
in a few hours in the same day. (When convenient, I took it with a milk product,
or a thick soup, to protect my stomach.)

In my case,
my worst symptom was temporary impairment of hearing,
in which I heard people speaking, close up,
but I coud not hear what thay were saying.
If thay had asked me a question, I 'd have been embarrassed.
I did not get caught.

In my lifetime, this happened maybe 2 or 3 times.
I was alarmed by this, and I understood that
I had overdosed on aspirin; (I don't remember how many pills).
That has not happened during this century.


My other (more common) symptom was very profuse perspiration,
but I have very seldom had any evidence of bleeding.
On the seldom occasions that I did,
it took the form of my noticing some bruises
on my arms or chest.



ANYWAY,
I just thought that it was interesting, in its own right,
how DIFFERENTLY 2 human beings can react
to ingestion of aspirin, when one must be hospitalized for taking 1 per day,
and I had a significantly milder, less eventful reaction to taking maybe,
possibly around approximately 30 or 40 (extra strength) aspirin per day, about 20 or 25 years ago.
farmerman
 
  1  
Tue 25 Jan, 2011 05:52 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Aswe age, we handle medications differently than we did in our younger days. Metabolisms change and its possible that a decent clinical dose in our 20's could be very harmful in our 70's, and possibly fatal in our 90's.

One of the first symptoms of analgesic overdose is ringing in the ears, so your loss of hearing is quite common. You probably developed a wicked case of Tinnitus due to the aspirin or acetominophen overdose.
Your hearing is a good canary and Id advise you to pay attention when you do those massive doses.

Besides, as set said, youre just pissing away the overdose (unless you timed your dose to take new doses every hour or so --This is a much more dangerous a practice)
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Tue 25 Jan, 2011 06:03 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
As we age, we handle medications differently than we did in our younger days. Metabolisms change and its possible that a decent clinical dose in our 20's could be very harmful in our 70's, and possibly fatal in our 90's.

One of the first symptoms of analgesic overdose is ringing in the ears, so your loss of hearing is quite common. You probably developed a wicked case of Tinnitus due to the aspirin or acetominophen overdose.
Your hearing is a good canary and Id advise you to pay attention when you do those massive doses.

Besides, as set said, youre just pissing away the overdose (unless you timed your dose to take new doses every hour or so --This is a much more dangerous a practice)
I have never had any ringing in my ears
(except when standing too close to unexpected gunfire, without my ear protection in place).





David
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Tue 25 Jan, 2011 06:25 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
my worst symptom was temporary impairment of hearing,
in which I heard people speaking, close up,
but I coud not hear what thay were saying
Tinnitus hits people differently. For you, it just closed off hearing with "White" noise. If I take 2 aspirins I get a ringing in my ears which affects my hearing also.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Tue 25 Jan, 2011 06:33 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
my worst symptom was temporary impairment of hearing,
in which I heard people speaking, close up,
but I coud not hear what thay were saying
farmerman wrote:
Tinnitus hits people differently. For you, it just closed off hearing with "White" noise.
If I take 2 aspirins I get a ringing in my ears which affects my hearing also.
My understanding of "white noise"
is such static as is forthcoming from the radio (between stations).
I have never heard static sounds in response to aspirin overdose.
Its only that what thay said was indistinct,
as tho blurred. I did not hear it clearly enuf to understand it.

When no one was speaking, when I was alone,
I heard ordinary, complete silence; no ringing sound, nor any sound, just quiet.
farmerman
 
  1  
Tue 25 Jan, 2011 06:59 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Here,
Quote:
Regular Analgesic Use Increases Hearing Loss in Men, Study Finds
ScienceDaily (Mar. 1, 2010) — In a study published in the March 2010 issue of The American Journal of Medicine, researchers determined that regular use of aspirin, acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increases the risk of hearing loss in men, particularly in younger men, below age 60.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the US, afflicting over 36 million people. Not only is hearing loss highly prevalent among the elderly, but approximately one third of those aged 40-49 years already suffer from hearing loss. Even mild hearing loss can compromise the ability to understand speech in the presence of background noise or multiple speakers, leading to social isolation, depression, and poorer quality of life.

Investigators from Harvard University, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Vanderbilt University and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston looked at factors other than age and noise that might influence the risk of hearing lose. Aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen are the 3 most commonly used drugs in the US. The ototoxic effects of aspirin are well known and the ototoxicity of NSAIDs has been suggested, but the relation between acetaminophen and hearing loss has not been examined previously. The relationship between these drugs and hearing loss is an important public health issue.

Study participants were drawn from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, which tracked over 26,000 men every 2 years for 18 years. A questionnaire determined analgesic use, hearing loss and a variety of physiological, medical and demographic factors.

For aspirin, regular users under 50 and those aged 50-59 years were 33% more likely to have hearing loss than were nonregular users, but there was no association among men aged 60 years and older. For NSAIDs, regular users aged under 50 were 61% more likely, those aged 50-59 were 32% more likely, and those aged 60 and older were 16% more likely to develop hearing loss than nonregular users of NSAIDs. For acetaminophen, regular users aged under 50 were 99% more likely, regular users aged 50-59 were 38% more likely, and those aged 60 and older were 16% more likely to have hearing loss than nonregular users of acetaminophen.

Writing in the article, Sharon G. Curhan, MD, ScM, Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, and colleagues state, "Regular use of analgesics, specifically aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen, might increase the risk of adult hearing loss, particularly in younger individuals. Given the high prevalence of regular analgesic use and health and social implications of hearing impairment, this represents an important public health issue
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Tue 25 Jan, 2011 07:05 am
@farmerman,

The worst of it, only lasted a few hours.
0 Replies
 
VikramSidhu
 
  0  
Sat 4 May, 2019 01:02 am
@edgarblythe,
Thank you for providing the information and sharing your experience. There are many people around here who are taking aspirin without the consultation of a doctor.
0 Replies
 
manishsharma12
 
  0  
Sat 4 May, 2019 01:39 am
@edgarblythe,
I hope she is fine now.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Sat 4 May, 2019 10:36 am
@farmerman,
I know what caused my hearing loss. While in the USAF in the late 1950's, I bought a Heath kit to build a sound system. After it was built, my buddies used to come to my room to play music, and they played it very loud. My left ear is worse than my right, so I'm staying away from hearing aids for now.
0 Replies
 
manishsharma12
 
  0  
Thu 9 May, 2019 04:22 am
@edgarblythe,
I hope she is fine now.
0 Replies
 
sumita12sofat
 
  0  
Wed 15 May, 2019 02:17 am
@edgarblythe,
I love the taste of those baby chewable aspirin and I can't see how taking one a day would do any harm. I think this thread is important to let people know the huge difference between a regular aspirin and a baby aspirin, so they can keep themselves safe and I also agree that everyone should consult with their doctors before taking any kinds of meds.
0 Replies
 
 

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