228
   

The Last Movie You Saw On DVD or VHS or TV.

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 03:58 am
@izzythepush,
Imagine the rush to have a "Hindenburg" tourist site in LAkewood NJ.

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 05:09 am
@farmerman,
Synchronicity again, I just read a joke ad for a Hindenberg disaster bear in Viz magazine.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Apr, 2012 04:36 pm
@izzythepush,
I just saw the first episode of the second series of Game Of Thrones.
raprap
 
  2  
Reply Mon 2 Apr, 2012 07:13 pm
@izzythepush,
Saw 'Hunger Games' which made me realize that 'V is for Vengeance' is a far more realistic and hopeful post apocalyptic story.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Apr, 2012 07:35 pm
@raprap,
Did you mean V for Vendetta (2005)?
www.imdb.com/title/tt0434409/

And you do realize that The Hunger Games will be a trilogy, right?
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Apr, 2012 07:48 pm
@tsarstepan,
Yes and Yes--'V for Vendetta' presented a means, a basis, for the totalitarianism--something that is missing from 'Hunger Games".

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2012 02:23 am
@raprap,
The graphic novel is a lot better, the story is a bit different. It was written in the early 80s and set in 1999. It's most post nuclear than biological.
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2012 09:03 am
@raprap,
A better comparison might be to Koushun Takami's Battle Royale, although Suzanne Collins swears she had never read it or even heard of it when she wrote The Hunger Games trilogy.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2012 10:29 am
@Irishk,
Have you seen any of the new series of Game of Thrones yet?
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Apr, 2012 11:35 am
@izzythepush,
Yes! We watched the first episode of Season 2 and thought it quite good, considering all the time the opener spent to 'catch up' from the first season. Can't really say too much here for fear of spoiling, but I can probably safely say that the character of Melisandre is exactly how I pictured her when reading the books!

So, after watching, and as a fan of the novels, I'm left wanting more (and looking forward to Sunday nights).

What did you think?
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Apr, 2012 12:33 am
@Irishk,
I always imagined Stannis with a beard, and I thought it smart that they kept Anya out of it until next episode. I was trying to square everything up in my head as well, I saw the first series, then read all the books, so I had to think about where everything was.

I did enjoy it though, it's good the way they're showing Joffrey as a real monster. I'm looking forward to Monday night, we're two days behind you on this one.
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Apr, 2012 09:24 am
@izzythepush,
Agree on Joffrey! His depiction is near perfection. Thinking back, I guess I was most surprised by Craster's Keep and Craster himself, as I'd imagined him way creepier in the books. In the episode, he came across as almost normal lol. The Onion Knight, Davos, was a favorite of mine in this, the second book, and I thought they nailed his depiction as well.

Are you watching Julian Fellowes' Titanic? We probably won't get that on PBS' Masterpiece Theater for another 6 months or so (unless we go to the darknet LOL).
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Apr, 2012 09:30 am
@Irishk,
As a Sotonian I'm rather sick of the Titanic. We've got a new museum opening up, and we've all got free tickets. I will take the kids, but I'm a bit pissed off that our long history, including the place where Henry V set off to invade France, and the Rufus Stone, where William II was killed in a hunting accident, has just become the place where the Titanic sailed from.

Craster wasn't as creepy as I imagined him, but I think it's because I recognise the actor. Davos is one of my favourite characters too.
0 Replies
 
RonPrice
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Apr, 2012 10:48 pm
@barrythemod,
VALKYRIE*

Once one has learned to experience a poem as a poem, there inevitably arrives a sense that one is also experiencing oneself as a human being. I find this especially true of autobiographical prose-poetry which is the main genre of poetry that I write. This experiencing of oneself as a human being, of course, can be experienced by we humans in a myriad of ways.

The English poet and cultural critic Matthew Arnold(1822-1888) was attempting to describe this effect of poetry on the writer, and hopefully readers, when he referred to "that grand power of poetry...to awaken in us a wonderfully full, new and intimate sense of things and our relations with them."1 I would not have understood these words of Arnold’s in the years before I became a poet but, I now have this feeling, after at least two decades of extensive poetizing(1992-2012). This feeling is renewed after writing each poem.

As I write this revision of the poem Valkyrie, after watching the film Valkyrie for a second time this week, this same feeling was renewed. Valkyrie a 2008 American historical thriller set in Nazi Germany during World War II. It depicts the 20 July plot in 1944 by German army officers to assassinate Adolf Hitler and to use the Operation Valkyrie national emergency plan to take control of the country2. –Ron Price with thanks to 1J. Ciardi, How Does A Poem Mean, 2nd edition, Houghton Mifflin and Co., Boston, 1959, p. 3; 2Wikipedia, and *In Norse mythology a Valkyrie is a term from Old Norse, valkyrja, meaning "chooser of the slain." It is one of a host of female figures who decides who falls and dies in battle.

It was turning at last
against them and those
conspirators very nearly
assassinated him, just 3
days before I was born.1

It was turning at last
to another terrible kind
of darkness: worse, far
worse, than that old war.
It was then that I was born:
at the beginning of this new
darkness, fifty years after
the birth of an old Light,2
a Light which seems to
spread more slowly, so
slowly, unobtrusively, so
as not be seen as a threat,
at least not in these times.

As a great darkness and its
encompassing gloom spreads
again, slough of despond, as
those troubled forecasts of
doom do battle with phantoms
of the many wrongly informed
imaginations and our days pass
swiftly as the twinkle of a star
at this crucial turning point of a
juncture in history. And as I try
to make my mark: unbeknownst.3

Of course, it all depends on what
you look at now and in that century
of Light when seeds were and are
being scattered for many harvests
ahead as well as their sweet and
bountiful luxuriance & verdure.

1 An assassination attempt on Hitler's life was made on 20 July 1944, three days before I was born. Operation Valkyrie was a German Army plan that was converted into an attempted coup d'état. This coup d’etat failed after the 20 July 1944 plot. The 2008 film Valkyrie was based on events surrounding the operation. By 23/7/’44 the Nazis had begun to round-up and kill all the conspirators.
2 fifty years after the birth of the Baha'i Faith in North America in 1894.
3 Universal House of Justice, April 1999.

Ron Price
31 August 1998 to 30 January 2012

0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Apr, 2012 11:04 pm
I just saw '50/50'.
I'm real tired of Seth Rogan always playing the same juvenile, sex-crazed, foul-mouthed character in every movie, but the other actors and the great storyline (about a very young man who gets a rare form of cancer and what goes on in his life out of that) made it worth watching.
Philippos
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Apr, 2012 11:07 pm
@snood,
sounds interesting. how does the title relate to the plot?
Philippos
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Apr, 2012 11:08 pm
@Philippos,
ah...chance of survival...did he survive?
Philippos
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Apr, 2012 11:10 pm
@Philippos,
so it could have been called "100 in hindsight?"
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Apr, 2012 07:18 am
@Philippos,
Philippos wrote:

sounds interesting. how does the title relate to the plot?

When the main character got his diagnosis, he went and looked up on the internet the type of cancer he had. It told him the chance of recovery was 50%. When his friend asked him about the prognosis for his survival, he answered "50/50".
jcboy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Apr, 2012 08:07 am
@snood,
We're watching the Goonies! Razz


Everything. OK! I'll talk! In third grade, I cheated on my history exam. In fourth grade, I stole my uncle Max's toupee and I glued it on my face when I was Moses in my Hebrew School play. In fifth grade, I knocked my sister Edie down the stairs and I blamed it on the dog... When my mom sent me to the summer camp for fat kids and then they served lunch I got nuts and I pigged out and they kicked me out... But the worst thing I ever done - I mixed a pot of fake puke at home and then I went to this movie theater, hid the puke in my jacket, climbed up to the balcony and then, t-t-then, I made a noise like this: hua-hua-hua-huaaaaaaa - and then I dumped it over the side, all over the people in the audience. And then, this was horrible, all the people started getting sick and throwing up all over each other. I never felt so bad in my entire life. Cool
0 Replies
 
 

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