1
   

I have a very big problem with gramar, though unique

 
 
Reply Mon 4 Nov, 2002 05:48 pm
I have a hard time writing in proper english, though I can sit there and read very hard books. I commonly misspell words or do not use the right puncuation. I think allot of this has to do with the books I read, mostly the really old ones. I spell, and end up using grammar like I am used to looking at. Kind of like how you end up moving somewhere and pick up an accent or voice tone of the people you are around.

I need to brush up on my skills alot, though I refuse to put these books down.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 7,549 • Replies: 48
No top replies

 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Nov, 2002 09:04 pm
Your problem isn't major, Mellow. From what I've noticed, reading your posts, your problem is in proper sentence structure. What you say is quite clear and understable, but sometimes it's awkwardly phrased. I'm not sure that you're right in saying that it's because of the books you're reading. It sounds more like you type things the way you would say them orally, with little thought given to proper sentence construction. I suggest you proof-read everything you write very carefully before you post it. But, again, the problem doesn't appear to be major.
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Nov, 2002 09:13 pm
I'm with MA. I can't conceive of any reason why the books you read can contribute to this problem. Old books have done nothing but help my grammar despite their archaic wording.
0 Replies
 
Anonymous
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 05:00 pm
I to agree in as much that I think writting colloquially is becomimg more and more evident by the day and this is where the problems come in. Laughing
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 05:05 pm
Generally, the more books you read (even old ones), the better your writing becomes. At least that's what I've observed in my travels, not only on the 'Net but also in - gasp! - real life. If you wish, pick up a style manual like Strunk & White. These manuals aren't perfect, and it may not be precisely what you're looking for, but you'll learn things like the correct use of punctuation (they also cover stuff like bibliography creation, which obviously isn't needed here). Another avenue to explore is to visit your local college or university and find out which book(s) they use in their basic English composition class.

I have found that I often spend a moment rereading whatever I write before clicking "Submit". I skip words, misspell things, stuff runs together, etc., but the rereading gives me the opportunity to correct all of that.
0 Replies
 
Anonymous
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 05:08 pm
I leave out whole parts because I'm thinkig too fast and trying to sy to much to soon.
0 Replies
 
Anonymous
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 05:09 pm
You see.....
0 Replies
 
MellowGemini
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 05:35 pm
You are all right.
My writting whether it be here or in a book all comes from what they consider stream of Conciense, in other word's my work or writing is a stream that flows through me and at times a fish gets stuck that is flopping around trying to break free. Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Anonymous
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2002 05:48 pm
Well put.
Laughing
0 Replies
 
Asherman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Nov, 2002 09:39 am
I strongly recommend using your word processor's spell and grammar check features. The computer will point out to you most problem areas in your writing, and sometimes suggest a corrective. Try to understand what it was that raised the computer caution signal, and what needed to be changed to fix the problem.

At first you may find the number of problems overwhelming. After awhile you will begin to see patterns developing. We all tend to made the same mis-spellings, or grammatical faults, over and over again. Focus on fixing those common things you have problems with, and your writing will show steady improvement.

I've found that the readability statistics to be very useful. Generally, simplicity and brevity are the best targets to shoot for. Short, simple sentences are most easily understood, and least likely to have grammatical faults. I shoot for an average sentence of around 14 words. Simple words are generally preferable to fancy ones. Churchill produced some of the most stirring prose in our language, yet seldom used a “fancy” word when an Anglo-Saxon one was readily available. Similarly, short paragraphs built around a single idea are less confusing than otherwise.

You mention the influence of old books. Actually, there is something to that. Styles do evolve and change. During the 19th century long, slow-paced prose was considered elegant and fashionable. Readers, who often had only limited access to reading material, wanted books that would take months to read. Today, with information flooding in from every side, readers tend to only skim through a piece. Most readers today prefer action and a fast pace to lengthy description and complex construction. If you fail to engage the reader, whatever you have to say will be lost. Make it easy for the reader where ever you can.

You already have a natural ability to communicate an idea in interesting, colorful ways. I feel your burning need to communicate some passionate observations/ideas to the larger world. That is important. Without something to say, a writer is like a car without gas. You have gas. LOL. Now you only need to put the car’s mechanical systems in order. It will take some effort, and patience, but I expect soon to see you out on the race track.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Nov, 2002 03:07 am
All the responses here are helpful. I think you need to slow down. Take Jespah's advice and read what you write.

I also suggest you think about what you want to say before you start writing. At first this might seem as though it is slowing you down, but in the long run it will help you to focus and get to the heart of what you want to say.
0 Replies
 
Debacle
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Nov, 2002 05:35 am
Hey Roboida! Muchas welkommen! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Nov, 2002 03:02 am
Mercy bow coo. Nice to be here.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Nov, 2002 10:48 pm
Roboita!!! Welcome!!![/[/color]size]
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Nov, 2002 11:14 pm
Roboita!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Helloooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!
0 Replies
 
cobalt
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Nov, 2002 11:37 pm
Say hey, Roboida! Oh yes, hellos out to all my homies here, too, LOL.

I am interested in this discussion with the various responses. I don't think I have a "problem" with sentence structure or grammer, but I am very aware that I no longer care much about it all. I believe that just as my signature has become illegible, my sentences in "text" are becomming very sloppy. But, I also think that I am now writing as I speak. Therefore, when one is posting in general forums, it would be proper to use much vernacular and be 'loose' for that is an informal context. But, in actual writing forums or public/political debate, a more formal response is recommended. Does anyone have a comment, yay or nae?
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2002 12:22 am
Absolutely agree with you, Cobalt. I've always told my students that it's perfectly okay to use bad grammar as long as it's obvious you're doing it on purpose and can use the proper syntax when required. In everyday speech I use vernarcural and colloquialisms, even slang. So, why not do so on a general dicussion forum? After all, on these general threads, we're just having an informal chat, not a learned debate. If I say, "Ain't that the truth," I trust everyone knows that I'm being semi-facetious in the use of "ain't." Go for it!
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2002 12:47 am
MA,

Thanks for the welcome.

R
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2002 12:50 am
Hey Margo,

Helloooooo right back atcha.

R
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2002 12:57 am
Hiya Cobalt,

I think that writing in forums such as this tends to be very informal and conversational, which are loose approaches to English. However, I don't think we should be playing fast and loose with the language until we have mastered it. I agree with Merry Andrew in this respect.

But I view habitual carelessness in an entirely different light. Not a good one.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » I have a very big problem with gramar, though unique
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.07 seconds on 10/23/2021 at 06:52:51