9
   

Reasons to not want Hillary in '24

 
 
hightor
 
  4  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 05:55 am
@Mame,
Quote:
Could you explain to me why any party in power doesn't reach out to the opposition and work together?

Probably not. I guess the simplest explanation is that, in purely partisan terms, one side sees an electoral advantage in obstruction and the other in not compromising. Note that this has nothing to do with what's good for the people who actually live in the country and who expect their elected representatives to enact responsible policies, only what's temporarily good for one party. This is an exciting little game for politicians and the voters confuse all the partisan activity with actual governance.

A two party system, or at least one like we suffer with in the USA, almost by definition, tends to exacerbate polarization. In a situation as we see now, with the party "in power" being unable to count on its "majority" to pass legislation, it's possible that Biden might have had more success with trying to pick off a few of the Republican senators by crafting bills which would attract bi-partisan support, the way the big covid relief bills did during the last session, and the way the American Rescue Plan passed earlier this year. But the GOP would most likely see a political advantage in rejecting compromise and letting the Democrats fail, counting on voter disgust to give them victory in the next election cycle. And the progressive wing of the Democratic Party seems to have pretty much the same mindset, as it appears to be more concerned with ideological purity than actually passing bill which might only contain 75% of what was originally promised but found to be unachievable.

When political victory is based on voter disgust rather that legislative accomplishment we know that our system has, to put it mildly, a "problem".
Mame
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 06:42 am
@hightor,
Thank you. That's pretty depressing.
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 07:07 am
@Mame,
It's worked well at least a few times in the past. Both Roosevelt and LBJ were able to count on large majorities to push through significant reforms. And, during the 1950's, there were liberals and conservatives in both parties and there was a postwar consensus on progress which led to frequent bi-partisan successes. Sadly, I don't see anything like that ever being achieved again. When the two sides can't even agree on how to stop a pandemic or commit to address climate change it's kind of obvious that the purely political takes precedence over the welfare of the people or the planet.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 08:13 am
The moneyed interests have bought most of our politicians, regardless of party. They talk a good game, some of them, but most don't go against their donors.
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 08:31 am
@edgarblythe,
I know. And campaign finance reform has been talked about for decades.

What we have is a barely-working parochial oligarchy which pays lip service to "the people" while functioning as an arm of the corporate class and an ideologically-divided electorate misled by a national mythology which should have been discarded years ago.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 08:38 am
@hightor,
Has there total system ever been reformed?

The first successful reform act over here was in 1832 and at the time there was fear that tinkering with the system might lead to chaos.

Is there a similar feeling over there?
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 08:40 am
@hightor,
Well said! (unfortunately)
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 10:34 am
@hightor,
There's no pressure for bipartisanship, they merely change places every four to eight years and the outs begin to work their way back in using the same set of voters the ins used to get in.

A simple fix would be to change the system to to allow for a real third or fourth party challenge. Make winners of an election actually take a majority of votes 51% or better, with a run off if no one breaks 50%.

Now parties have a reason to work together and not just accommodate each other.

The other fix is in the hand of SCOTUS: corporations are not individuals with full Constitutional rights, and money is not always free speech, and protected speech is not corporations buying a dictatorship.

The Constitution is about parity and a level playing ground. This is not what we have.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 10:45 am
One partial but effective fix would be to ban under threat of long prison time and lost corporate status and money anything that might be construed as bribing a public official.
0 Replies
 
Albuquerque
 
  4  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 11:39 am
Not a fan of the Clintons but they are way better then any Republican could ever aspire to be.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 12:32 pm
(not about Hillary but it feels like it fits here)

America Is Falling Apart at the Seams

Quote:
In June a statistic floated across my desk that startled me. In 2020, the number of miles Americans drove fell 13 percent because of the pandemic, but the number of traffic deaths rose 7 percent.

I couldn’t figure it out. Why would Americans be driving so much more recklessly during the pandemic? But then in the first half of 2021, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, motor vehicle deaths were up 18.4 percent even over 2020. Contributing factors, according to the agency, included driving under the influence, speeding and failure to wear a seatbelt.

Why are so many Americans driving irresponsibly?

While gloomy numbers like these were rattling around in my brain, a Substack article from Matthew Yglesias hit my inbox this week. It was titled, “All Kinds of Bad Behavior Is on the Rise.” Not only is reckless driving on the rise, Yglesias pointed out, but the number of altercations on airplanes has exploded, the murder rate is surging in cities, drug overdoses are increasing, Americans are drinking more, nurses say patients are getting more abusive, and so on and so on.

Yglesias is right.

Teachers are facing a rising tide of disruptive behavior. The Wall Street Journal reported in December: “Schools have seen an increase in both minor incidents, like students talking in class, and more serious issues, such as fights and gun possession. In Dallas, disruptive classroom incidents have tripled this year compared with prepandemic levels, school officials said.”

This month, the Institute for Family Studies published an essay called “The Drug Epidemic Just Keeps Getting Worse.” The essay noted that drug deaths had risen almost continuously for more than 20 years, but “overdoses shot up especially during the pandemic.” For much of this time the overdose crisis has been heavily concentrated among whites, but in 2020, the essay observed, “the Black rate exceeded the white rate for the first time.”

In October, CNN ran a story titled, “Hate Crime Reports in U.S. Surge to the Highest Level in 12 Years, F.B.I. Says.” The F.B.I. found that between 2019 and 2020 the number of attacks targeting Black people, for example, rose to 2,871 from 1,972.

The number of gun purchases has soared. In January 2021, more than two million firearms were bought, The Washington Post reported, “an 80 percent year-over-year spike and the third-highest one-month total on record.”

As Americans’ hostility toward one another seems to be growing, their care for one another seems to be falling. A study from Indiana University’s Lilly Family School of Philanthropy found that the share of Americans who give to charity is steadily declining. In 2000, 66.2 percent of households made a charitable donation. But by 2018 only 49.6 percent did. The share who gave to religious causes dropped as worship service attendance did. But the share of households who gave to secular causes also hit a new low, 42 percent, in 2018.

This is not even to mention the parts of the deteriorating climate that are hard to quantify — the rise in polarization, hatred, anger and fear. When I went to college, lo these many years ago, I never worried that I might say something in class that would get me ostracized. But now the college students I know fear that one errant sentence could lead to social death. That’s a monumental sea change.

It has to be said that not every trend is bad. Substance use among teenagers, for example, seems to be declining. And a lot of these problems are caused by the presumably temporary stress of the pandemic. I doubt as many people would be punching flight attendants or throwing temper tantrums over cheese if there weren’t mask rules and a deadly virus to worry about.

But something darker and deeper seems to be happening as well — a long-term loss of solidarity, a long-term rise in estrangement and hostility. This is what it feels like to live in a society that is dissolving from the bottom up as much as from the top down.

What the hell is going on? The short answer: I don’t know. I also don’t know what’s causing the high rates of depression, suicide and loneliness that dogged Americans even before the pandemic and that are the sad flip side of all the hostility and recklessness I’ve just described.

We can round up the usual suspects: social media, rotten politics. When President Donald Trump signaled it was OK to hate marginalized groups, a lot of people were bound to see that as permission.

Some of our poisons must be sociological — the fraying of the social fabric. Last year, Gallup had a report titled, “U.S. Church Membership Falls Below Majority for First Time.” In 2019, the Pew Research Center had a report, “U.S. Has World’s Highest Rate of Children Living in Single Parent Households.”

And some of the poisons must be cultural. In 2018, The Washington Post had a story headlined, “America Is a Nation of Narcissists, According to Two New Studies.”

But there must also be some spiritual or moral problem at the core of this. Over the past several years, and over a wide range of different behaviors, Americans have been acting in fewer pro-social and relational ways and in more antisocial and self-destructive ways. But why?

As a columnist, I’m supposed to have some answers. But I just don’t right now. I just know the situation is dire.

nyt/brooks
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 01:24 pm
Laying the blame for all of this on Trump is a mistake. His actions made it all worse faster, and could have sent us totally over the brink, but it all was already on a track guaranteeing continued division and pillaging of the lives of ordinary people. He just made the corruption a mainstream commodity. If our people continue to give shade to the forces beyond Trump that encourage the dysfunction we're going to get to some breaking point. As it stands, Trump is the clarion call that puts reform to sleep because we don't need to think - just say we aren't Trump.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 01:37 pm
I found an explanation of options some give when explaining why Democrats can't move bills or do executive orders.
edgarblythe
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 02:48 pm
0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 10:44 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
The choice couldn’t be more clear: We either win big this November by defeating the coup and its Republican enablers — or we kiss our democracy goodbye.

As frightening as that is, I believe that to be true.


Quote:
The Republicans have won the popular vote only ONCE since the election of the first Bush in 1988. For the past 34 years the American people have made it abundantly clear that they do not want Republicans running this country. Only voter suppression, gerrymandering and the racist invention called the “electoral college“ have given the Right any power at all. WE hold the real power because there are tens of millions more Americans who agree with us, not them.

That is a valid and strong point.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2022 11:20 pm
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Jan, 2022 12:04 am
@Real Music,
This is one of my main reasons for pushing so hard on the Democrats to do their best.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 15 Jan, 2022 06:53 am
@edgarblythe,
Articles have recently reported that Biden and Harris are pretty seriously unpopular with the bulk of voters that put them in office and that Republicans had enjoyed a surge in membership.

The gist of the article was that Biden not Harris could win—and they had a picture of Clinton as an alternative.

I’ll see if I can find it.
Lash
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 15 Jan, 2022 06:57 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

Articles have recently reported that Biden and Harris are pretty seriously unpopular with the bulk of voters that put them in office and that Republicans had enjoyed a surge in membership.

The gist of the article was that Biden not Harris could win—and they had a picture of Clinton as an alternative.

I’ll see if I can find it.


WSJ. Typed in search words ‘Biden Harris unpopular Clinton’. See. Anyone can do it.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/hillary-clinton-2024-comeback-president-biden-harris-democrat-nominee-race-2022-midterm-loss-11641914951

Biden and Harris made a lot of promises they didn’t keep.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 15 Jan, 2022 07:03 am
Wow. It’s everywhere. She’s trying to float herself yet again as a presidential nominee.

https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2022/01/12/politics/hillary-clinton-2024-presidential-election/index.html
 

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