13
   

This is Biden's America

 
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 10:13 am
Hightor is closer to the reality about the how and why people use catchy phrases like “kids in cages”.

It’s not seriously intended to persuade anyone to do anything. It’s more for the benefit of those glibly tossing the phrase about - so they can feel like they’re really sticking it to the man; doing something meaningful; speaking truth to power.

Hollering “kids in cages” and saying it’s because you’re trying to push Joe Biden to get substantial progress done on immigration policy makes no damn sense.

0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 10:29 am
@hightor,
hightor wrote:
Do you see an effective, achievable solution? I haven't seen one offered yet.

We could just let immigrants freely come in so long as they are willing to become productive citizens of our country. We are after all a country founded on immigration.
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 11:27 am
@oralloy,
I'd prefer a "guest worker" program, where people entering the country are registered to stay a certain length of time and quickly deployed to sectors of the economy where they are needed. They'd have access to health care and education and a certain portion of their incomes would be invested in interest-bearing accounts. Upon returning to their homes this money would be deposited in their own personal accounts. I think these returning people, with money in their pockets and good working experience would have a positive effect in their native countries, especially if we helped their countries set up plans for putting them to work. I don't think it makes sense to encourage the entire populations of various failed states to immigrate; at some point the root causes (poverty, income inequality, kleptocracy, and oppression) need to be dealt with, not simple escaped from.
Mame
 
  2  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 11:36 am
@hightor,
hightor wrote:

I don't think it makes sense to encourage the entire populations of various failed states to immigrate; at some point the root causes (poverty, income inequality, kleptocracy, and oppression need to be dealt with, not simple escaped from.


Well, this is the crux of the problem, isn't it? And I'm talking about all the countries where the migrants originate. Crime, war, famine... how do you stop all that and, actually, should we? That is the dilemma. If people (rulers, factions) stopped persecuting their own inhabitants, we wouldn't have (most of) the current migrant crises.

But the question is... what to do and who is to do it? And... should they do it? Europe is straining under their migrant issues, some countries refuse to accept any, some are sending them home... and home to war, crime, and famine.
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 12:03 pm
@Mame,
Quote:
But the question is... what to do and who is to do it?


As with so many of the difficulties confronting us, I don't think anyone's got a clue. It's easy to point out problems – workable solutions not so much. The complicity of the USA in establishing oppressive regimes and keeping them in power adds another complication. The lack of international cooperation and the dysfunctionality of the UN don't help. As with certain diseases, societal decay (and climate change) can only be cured up to a point. There actually may no longer even be a constructive solution.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 12:04 pm
Whatever mobilizes people to confront a twisted in knots government is great with me. When the situation merely shifts from one administration to the next it's evidence that the real problem is never going to be handled.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  2  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 12:12 pm
@hightor,
Exactly. I don't think there is a solution. It's depressing and I just thank god every day that I'm not 10 or 20 years old. I don't have that much longer to live with all this shite.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 12:16 pm
Until they open the borders to immigrants and quit locking them up it will stay like this. Let them get jobs and pay taxes. Reunite the families as much as possible and let them get on with their lives.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 12:51 pm
@edgarblythe,
Yes, and they send money back, so everybody wins.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 02:25 pm
@edgarblythe,
I don't think opening the borders to everyone who wishes to settle here permanently, regardless of education level and skill, is a good solution either. I think it would create a major disruption of the work force, bringing in hundreds of thousands of low wage workers as industry works to automate the trucking, warehouse, and field harvesting jobs that normally are filled by low skilled workers and there are only so many McJobs in the fast food industry to go around. The lack of low cost housing is another problem. That's why I'd prefer a more managed approach with temporary work visas in industries that
contract with the government for guest workers.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 16 Sep, 2021 04:35 pm
@hightor,
The second part of my plan is to stop creating the situations that create these immigrations. Instead, work with the nations that they come from to give them reason to stay where they are.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2021 03:47 am
@hightor,
hightor wrote:
as industry works to automate the trucking, warehouse, and field harvesting jobs that normally are filled by low skilled workers and there are only so many McJobs in the fast food industry to go around.

I think this is a separate issue from immigration, requiring its own solution.

If society manages to transition to something that does not require many employees in order for goods to be produced in automated factories, the government will likely need to start taxing producers more heavily (as they will be the only ones generating income, and they'll be generating a lot of it), and using that tax revenue to fund social programs to support the masses who are unable to get jobs anymore.
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2021 04:16 am
@oralloy,
That's an interesting thought, oralloy. Although the idea of a hundred million or more people just lolling around on government support raises problems of its own. Ancient Rome offered "bread and circuses". In Brave New World the World State provided "Soma", which had "all the advantages of Christianity and alcohol; none of their defects." I think I'd prefer a Civilian Climate Corps – people need to be kept busy and there's so much work to do.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2021 01:56 pm
Question: When is a Democratic majority not a Democratic majority? Answer: When it’s a Democratic majority.
https://truthout.org/articles/as-democratic-gears-grind-their-flawed-legislation-tiptoes-toward-doom/?fbclid=IwAR2Lsc1NDtzd0KHAsPJDedihD8K0N_gZsvJk4v3d8YAxnHSwjmFNb0BWK5w

The roof started to cave in visibly on Monday, when House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned her caucus to expect “adjustments” to the $3.5 trillion climate/social spending budget bill that lies at the center of President Biden’s policy agenda. This is Democrat for “Prepare for imminent retreat, again.”

A day later, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced that they would keep to a totally artificial and arbitrary September 27 deadline for voting on the $1 trillion infrastructure bill, a huge victory for the likes of Sen. Kyrsten Sinema and the House Pharma Dems, who have been chopping away at the legislation like hyper-caffeinated woodpeckers (or like feckless politicians swimming in lobbyist cash).

Uncompromised, uncompromising news
Get reliable, independent news and commentary delivered to your inbox every day.

Email
[email protected]
Members of the Progressive Caucus have made it clear that they plan to vote to kill the infrastructure bill if it is brought up separately from the budget bill, because they know conservative Democrats will vote for the former and against the latter if they don’t come on the same sled.

It is clear at this juncture that the budget bill will not be ready for a vote by September 27. Hoyer’s announcement effectively decoupled the two bills, and if the Progressive Caucus is to maintain any credibility at all, they will have to vote down the infrastructure bill in order to rescue both it and the climate bill; if the infrastructure bill fails, it can be offered again coupled to the budget bill once the budget bill is ready for daylight.

The plot thickened substantially late Tuesday after Rep. Pramila Jayapal, chair of the House Progressive Caucus, emerged from a two-hour meeting with Speaker Pelosi. Upon its conclusion, Jayapal made it known that she had enough votes in hand — half the 95-person caucus, in her words — to kill the infrastructure bill. Deftly swatting the ball into the Speaker’s court, Jayapal said, “I don’t think that the Speaker is going to bring a bill up that is going to fail.”

Note well, gentle reader, that there is almost no Republican involvement in this slow-rolling fiasco. Mitch McConnell has informed the world that there will be no Republican votes for anything — the budget bill, the government shutdown bill, or the debt ceiling bill — which effectively makes him and his caucus one of the lakes on the Stratego game board: It’s there, it ain’t moving, so you have to go around it.

House Republicans are even more invisible, though there is mounting pressure on Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to whip his caucus into voting “no” on the infrastructure bill. If 30+ Democrats also vote “no,” however, those GOP votes will be a sullen afterthought and nothing more.

President Biden, whose entire domestic agenda is about to go up in a ball of flaming tatters, is planning to hold a Wednesday sit-down with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Speaker Pelosi in order to find a way forward. A number of Democrats have been pleading with Biden to get more involved in the process, but the guest list raises the question: Why just those two, and not Jayapal and a contingent from the Progressive Caucus? Why not Bernie Sanders, who has cultivated this process with care and patience from the beginning? Why not the real adults in the room who have the power to make or break this thing?

It is past time to stop mollifying “moderate” (conservative!) Democrats, who have been the real wreckers over the course of this process. A full 80 percent of Sinema’s Arizona voters support the Medicare/drug pricing reforms she has pledged to vote against, and the only coherent reason she opposes those reforms is because a dark money group funded by the pharmaceutical industry launched a massive ad campaign praising her just before she announced her opposition.

The whole thing smells like smoke right now, like gears grinding, like a massive and tragic waste of everyone’s time.
When you make concessions to that sort of brazen broad-daylight corruption, concessions that will cause real-world pain for millions of real-world people, you will come away with nothing and get everything you deserve. The progressives have been steadfast throughout this benighted process — they have stood for everything a “Democrat” is supposed to support, they have already made significant compromises with the “moderates” in the name of progress, and it looks an awful lot like they are about to get the back of Pelosi’s hand, again.

If so, there’s a galling irony here. The Democrats were thrilled to recapture the House majority in 2018, having done so by riding anti-Trump sentiment to victory in a number of conservative districts. Those gains were rolled back in 2020 when Republicans took back a number of those seats. In the time between, Speaker Pelosi has gone above and beyond defending the safety of her “moderate” Reps, even when they voted with Republicans time and again.

Those same “moderates” are now the ones trashing this entire process. When is a majority not a majority? When those people are allowed to drive the bus.

The whole thing smells like smoke right now, like gears grinding, like a massive and tragic waste of everyone’s time.

In a way, I suppose, it might come to be a fitting epitaph: To have all this sound and fury come to nothing because the people who round out the House majority are also doing the most damage to the priorities of that majority. These conservative Democrats don’t want to make prescription drugs more affordable, any more than they want to tax their wealthy benefactors. That fact has already been included as one of the concessions made in the way these bills will pay for themselves, and it stands as a glaring flaw at the heart of the whole process. For all the genuine good contained in the budget bill, it pays for itself while making sure the vast wealth of the wealthiest remains virtually untouched. Former Labor Secretary Robert Reich explains:

Last week, the House Ways and Means Committee released its proposed tax increases to fund President Biden’s $3.5 trillion social policy plan. Here’s the big thing that hit me: Democrats didn’t go after the huge accumulations of wealth at the top – representing the largest share of the economy in more than a century.

You might have thought they’d be eager to tax America’s 660 billionaires whose fortunes have increased $1.8 trillion since the start of the pandemic — an amount that could fund half of Biden’s plan and still leave the billionaires as rich as they were before the pandemic began. But House Democrats on Ways and Means decided to raise revenue the traditional way, taxing annual income rather than immense wealth. They aim to raise the highest income tax rate and apply a 3 percent surtax to incomes over $5 million.

Yet the dirty little secret — which House Democrats certainly know — is the ultra-rich don’t live off their paychecks. Jeff Bezos’s salary from Amazon was $81,840 last year, yet he rakes in some $149,353 every minute from the soaring value of his Amazon stocks – which is how he affords five mansions, including one in Washington D.C. with 25 bathrooms.

In other words, a lot of things will improve if this bill somehow struggles safely to shore, but nothing significant will actually change. Capital must be protected, and wealth must be extracted: That should be carved into the sign on the Statue of Liberty, right below the word WARNING.

I live in a country where the current president has his job because Mike Pence got desperate consultation from Dan Quayle on the limits of his constitutional powers regarding the certification of Electors while a furious mob was battering down the Capitol doors trying to stop the whole thing in its tracks, and now a pair of bills that almost everyone likes is probably doomed because capitalism doesn’t want them.

It’s not over yet, and Democratic leadership could pull off the legislative version of a nine-run rally in the late innings… except these are the late innings, and there is a government shutdown/debt ceiling crisis to be dealt with almost simultaneously. “The worst are filled with passionate intensity,” said W.B. Yeats. Pretty much sums it up.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Oct, 2021 02:57 pm
Kafka in America. It Can’t Happen Here? (w/ Steven Donziger)
Episode 215: Rumble w/ Michael Moore

Michael Moore

Steven Donziger has spent the last 800 days under house arrest with a government tracking device around his ankle.

His crime?

Well, Donziger is the lawyer who successfully sued the oil giant Chevron on behalf of the people of Ecuador for deliberately discharging 16 billion gallons of toxic waste in the Ecuadorian Amazon between 1964 and 1992. Donziger and his colleagues succeeded and won a $9.5 billion judgment on behalf of the indigenous and poor communities of Ecuador in 2011. Chevron has yet to pay a dime on this judgement and instead, have brought this case to the friendly confines of the United States and turned Donziger, the person who successfully prosecuted them, into the one doing time.

On today’s episode of Rumble with Michael Moore, Steven Donziger joined me from his house arrest to explain his Kafka-esque/Twilight Zone case, how he’s been physically and mentally holding up, and what we all must do to fight back.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/20/2021 at 07:21:42