19
   

Monitoring Biden and other Contemporary Events

 
 
neptuneblue
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2021 08:56 pm
@oralloy,
I refute your claims and I am right.

oralloy
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2021 08:59 pm
@neptuneblue,
You have not provided anything to refute anything that I've said.
oralloy
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2021 09:01 pm
@neptuneblue,
neptuneblue wrote:
Cite two examples of Boehner honestly working with Obama.

One
PBS Frontline (one hour video):
https://ga.video.cdn.pbs.org/videos/frontline/47fe314b-3938-42a5-acd0-3505ebcc37bd/16172/hd-mezzanine-16x9/00003015-mp4-1200k-16x9.mp4

Two
The article that you cut-n-pasted here:
https://able2know.org/topic/555216-67#post-7118093
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2021 09:01 pm
@oralloy,
You've often said you'd provide citations when asked. That's a lie.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2021 09:25 pm
Well, this has certainly turned out to be an interesting discussion.
BillW
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2021 09:30 pm
@roger,
Roger, "discussion" is kind of a stretch I do believe.

Here are some adjectives for discussion: quick and expensive, brief follow-on, considerable sartorial, long and sufficiently idiotic, interminable and apparently fruitless, judicious and balanced, slightly lengthy, informal roundtable, animated but fruitless, open and frequent, exciting and crucial, long and semihysterical, sufficiently idiotic...

Never mind!
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2021 09:45 pm
Speaking of John Boehner...

Boehner lays blame for 'that bloody insurrection' at Trump's feet
By Chandelis Duster, CNN
Updated 7:58 PM ET, Wed April 7, 2021

(CNN)Former House Speaker John Boehner said former President Donald Trump "incited that bloody insurrection" at the US Capitol and blamed his false election claims for the GOP losing control of Congress, according to a copy of his forthcoming book obtained by CNN.

Republicans have wobbled over whether to embrace the 45th President's legacy as an electoral strategy, and Boehner's scathing rebuke amounts to the latest plea by the former de facto head of the GOP to resist Trump's influence as it defines itself in the Biden era.

Trump's "refusal to accept the result of the election not only cost Republicans the Senate but led to mob violence," the former speaker writes in his forthcoming book, "On the House: A Washington Memoir," adding, "It was painful to watch."

Boehner also said the former president "incited that bloody insurrection for nothing more than selfish reasons, perpetuated by the bullshit he'd been shoveling since he lost a fair election the previous November."

"He claimed voter fraud without any evidence, and repeated those claims, taking advantage of the trust placed in him by his supporters and ultimately betraying that trust," Boehner said.

Jason Miller, an adviser to Trump, called Boehner a "Swamp Creature" in a statement to CNN on Wednesday and suggested the former speaker's criticism was motivated by business interests with China. Boehner is a senior strategic adviser with Squire Patton Boggs, a large law firm that has offices in the US and across the globe, including China.

The passages were first reported on by The New York Times and later confirmed by CNN. The Times reported that Trump asked in an email to the paper about Boehner, "Was he drinking when he made this statement? Just another RINO who couldn't do the job!"

Boehner also wrote he wasn't prepared for Trump "refusing to accept the results and stoking the flames of conspiracy that turned into violence in the seat of our democracy" in the building he once presided over. "Watching it was scary, and sad. It should have been a wake-up call for a return to Republican sanity."

Boehner resigned as House speaker in late 2015 amid clashes with the growing conservative caucus of the Republican Party. Since then, he has occasionally publicly voiced disillusionment with the GOP under Trump's influence, saying in 2018, "There is no Republican Party. There's a Trump Party."

Meanwhile, Trump continues to exert significant pressure on the direction of the current Republican Party, which overwhelmingly voted to acquit him in this year's impeachment trial for his role in inciting the January 6 riot. Several leading Republicans have met with Trump, and the 45th president has announced plans to be an active participant in the midterm elections, including with his endorsement of Rep. Mo Brooks in the Alabama US Senate race on Wednesday.
0 Replies
 
lmur
 
  4  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 02:04 am
@roger,
Was it really? Yours is the first post I've seen in almost two pages.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 02:10 am
@lmur,
Someone needs to flush the bog.
hightor
 
  0  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 02:12 am
Methods of Power

How do authoritarians rule?

Quote:
The intellectual left reacted to Donald Trump’s election in 2016 in two very different ways. One group, like so many in the general public, immediately fell into full panic mode. The historian Timothy Snyder, for instance, rushed into print with a book called On Tyranny and in an interview declared it “pretty much inevitable” that Trump would follow Adolf Hitler’s example by declaring a state of emergency and staging a coup. Others urged caution. Snyder’s Yale colleague Samuel Moyn and Oxford’s David Priestland insisted in a New York Times opinion piece that “there is no real evidence that Mr. Trump wants to seize power unconstitutionally, and there is no reason to think he could succeed.” Trump, they claimed, was in reality a weak leader, despite his ability to exploit populist discontent. What was needed, they implied, was a focus less on his tweets and more on the neoliberalism and endless war that had provoked the discontent that brought him to power in the first place. The debates continued right through the 2020 election, with Snyder and many others continuing to warn of jackboots in the streets and Moyn and numerous other commentators insisting that the warnings themselves mostly worked to distract our attention from the staggering structural problems that the country faces.

The events of January 6 might seem to have resolved the debate. Trump’s incitement of the Capitol attack was a treasonous crime. The ragtag rioters caused five deaths and put many other lives in danger. But what Moyn in these pages called a “parodic coup” (others dubbed it the “Q d’état”) in fact had no chance of delaying the certification of Joe Biden’s victory for more than a few hours, let alone of overthrowing the federal government.

The sharply different views of the Trump presidency reflect two very different understandings of politics. The “ring the alarm bells” camp has tended to see right-wing authoritarianism as a powerful, malevolent force that can operate in at least partial independence from prevailing social and economic conditions. It can arise and destroy democracy wherever people lack the moral and institutional force to successfully oppose it. Even the erosion of relatively minor norms can have serious consequences, because it sets a precedent for more important transgressions. The “let’s focus on the larger problems” group, on the other hand, attributes the current manifestations of authoritarianism to broader social and economic conditions. Its members hold that the United States, while pathologically dysfunctional, is pathologically dysfunctional in a different way from the societies in which fascist dictators came to power in the 20th century. There, the virtual collapse of political order and civil society as a result of world war and economic depression created an opening for revolutionary right-wing mass movements. Here, on the other hand, neoliberal forces have proved perfectly capable of preserving their economic and political power through America’s existing, deeply imperfect but fundamentally stable constitutional system. It is the very dominance of these forces that generated the recent populist upsurge—and under Trump, the same forces also managed very largely to co-opt and neutralize it. (It is no coincidence, in this view, that among Trump’s major legacies are corporate deregulation and tax cuts for the superrich.) America’s problems, in the final analysis, can only be overcome through fundamental economic and political reform.

Ruth Ben-Ghiat, a distinguished historian of Italian fascism and a prolific political commentator, belonged firmly to the alarm-bells camp over the past four years. Less than two weeks into Trump’s presidency, she wrote an article titled “Donald Trump and Steve Bannon’s Coup in the Making.” Her new book, Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present, elaborates on that position in a full-length survey of the ways ambitious strongmen can damage or destroy democratic regimes. The book features Trump prominently, but it sets him in a rogues’ gallery of authoritarians and would-be authoritarians ranging from Hitler and Benito Mussolini to late-20th-century dictators like Augusto Pinochet, Moammar El-Gadhafi, and Idi Amin to present-day populists like Viktor Orbán, Narendra Modi, and Jair Bolsonaro. These strongmen, Ben-Ghiat argues, all followed roughly the same “playbook” for seizing power and holding on to it, despite the very different societies in which they emerged. The strongman, she insists, is a modern political type—indeed, the modern political type. “Ours is the age of the strongman,” she states categorically.

Ben-Ghiat’s story, like Snyder’s, is at its heart a moral drama. The crucial factors at play are not social and political conditions but rather unscrupulous ambition and greed, on the one hand, and the determination (or the lack thereof) to resist it, on the other. This point of view is a provocative one. Unfortunately, like many in the alarm-bells camp, Ben-Ghiat tends to treat it as self-evidently true, and she therefore devotes far more attention to the strongmen’s own actions than to the factors that allowed them to rise and determined whether or not they succeeded. The problem, as her own book reveals, is that authoritarians do not simply prevail through violence: They seduce, they appeal, they exert charisma. And to understand why the seduction works, we cannot look at the strongmen alone; we also need to consider the people who fall under their spell.

(...)

thenation/bell
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 08:21 am
Quote:
And to understand why the seduction works, we cannot look at the strongmen alone; we also need to consider the people who fall under their spell.

This is a key argument made by University of Manitoba Professor Bob Altemeyer in his research on authoritarianism. He also sees the problem as two-sided: the authoritarian personality and the segment of a population who desire (or respond positively to) such a figure. John Dean, in Conservatives Without Conscience lays this out quite clearly.
0 Replies
 
BillW
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 10:25 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

Someone needs to flush the bog.
Missed an "l" Izzy, that s/b "blog"!
izzythepush
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 10:38 am
@BillW,
That might work too, but I meant bog, that’s one of our slang terms for a lavatory.
BillW
 
  0  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 11:24 am
@izzythepush,
That's a new one, makes sense though! I had figured you did mean bog, and bogs do get cleared for a purpose too. Isn't English wonderful. I love language.
snood
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 11:41 am
Look at this. Now Faux Noise has hired - wait for it - the former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo as a paid on-air contributor.
Who - who, I ask ya - woulda thunk it

https://www.rawstory.com/fox-news-mike-pompeo/
izzythepush
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 11:46 am
@BillW,
You’ve clearly not heard Derek and Clive which is probably a good thing.

Dudley Moore was a lot cruder when he got drunk with Peter Cook.

Cook: Jesus was probably being misreported, he never said take up thy bed and walk.

Moore: He said, “Where’s the ******* bog? I’m dying mate, I’m dying.”

0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  0  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 12:09 pm
Joe Manchin just crushed liberals' dream for Joe Biden's first term

If ever anyone needs to primaried Joe Manchin needs it bad. There should be big united effort by democrats to run him out of the senate.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 12:46 pm
@lmur,
Thank you.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 12:53 pm
@snood,
Oh thank God, I was afraid that Fox would run out of preening, self-satisfied, arrogant, blow-hards..............now we will have access to that horses ass Pompeo. Whew, that was a close call.
glitterbag
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 8 Apr, 2021 01:33 pm
@oralloy,

Since you never lie and always present the facts, I hope you can settle this odd exchange you had with Hightor. Your sentence presents your relative as a horse thief and the murder victim was a sheriff your relative shot in the back of the head. You seemed pretty proud of the gun used by the murderer and mentioned how your family loves to pose with it. Think about it, are you really saying your relative was a horse thief AND a murder victim????....

I reposted the troubling sentences here to help you out:

hightor wrote:
You claimed some horse-thieving relative murdered a sheriff but you never offered any proof even when challenged.

You are lying and being deliberately offensive. My relative was the murder victim, and was killed by the horse thief.

The below comments are what I remembered (without double checking) from your boasting in the past:

He apparently has changed this story since his first telling, years earlier he was simply bursting with pride about how clever grandpappy was to sneak up and cowardly shoot someone in the back. (some people might describe PeePaw as a cop killer)
 

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