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Coronavirus

 
 
Bubbles66
 
  2  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2022 03:55 am
This was put out around the 15th July. (Gov.UK)

Everyone aged 50 and over will be among those offered a COVID-19 booster and a flu jab this autumn under plans to increase protection against respiratory viruses ahead of winter.

On coronavirus (COVID-19) boosters, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) has now published its final recommendations for this autumn’s programme.

Under the advice, those eligible for a further dose will be:

all adults aged 50 years and over
those aged 5 to 49 years in a clinical risk group, including pregnant women
those aged 5 to 49 years who are household contacts of people with immunosuppression
those aged 16 to 49 years who are carers
residents in a care home for older adults and staff working in care homes for older adults
frontline health and social care workers

In addition, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) will be widening the offer of the free flu vaccine to more eligible groups. These additional groups will only be eligible once the most vulnerable, including previously announced pre-school and primary school children, those aged 65 years and over and those in clinical risk groups, have been offered the jab.

The additional groups set to be offered the free flu vaccine in England will be:all adults aged 50 to 64 years
secondary school children in years 7, 8 and 9, who will be offered the vaccine in order of school year (starting with the youngest first)

The NHS will announce in due course when and how eligible groups will be able to book an appointment for their COVID-19 autumn booster, and when people aged 50 to 64 years old who are not in a clinical risk group will be able to get their free flu jab.

People in these groups are asked not to come forward until further information is announced.

Commenting on the autumn COVID-19 booster programme, Professor Anthony Harnden, Deputy Chair of the JCVI, said:

We have provided our final recommendations for the autumn programme to ensure the NHS and wider health system has time to plan a vaccine rollout well ahead of the winter season.

The COVID-19 boosters are highly effective at increasing immunity and, by offering a further dose to those at higher risk of severe illness this autumn, we hope to significantly reduce the risk of hospitalisations and deaths over the winter.

Dr Mary Ramsay, Head of Immunisation at UKHSA, said:

Widening the eligibility for the flu vaccine will help reduce the number of people getting seriously ill and ease pressures on the NHS, particularly during the busy winter period.

It is also important that everyone eligible for the COVID-19 booster gets the jab when invited, including pregnant women, who are among those at higher risk. Having COVID-19 during pregnancy can lead to complications. Getting the vaccine, including a booster, offers the best possible protection for you and your baby.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Aug, 2022 02:00 am
When the Omikron variant of the coronavirus began to spread worldwide, everything seemed to happen quickly in Europe at last. Politicians immediately pushed for a better vaccine, manufacturers, above all Biontech, developed an adapted vaccine within a few weeks and went into production: by the end of March, brand new Omikron doses were already piling up in countless freezers across the country.

But haste and determination have long since fizzled out. At the earliest in mid-September, perhaps not until October or even November, an adapted Omikron booster could be approved in the EU and then also vaccinated.
This is too late for a widely expected autumn corona wave.

Behind the scenes, politicians, authorities and manufacturers are now fighting over who is to blame for the next round of vaccination chaos. And how to proceed: Should an Omikron booster based on the first subtype BA.1 actually be launched in Europe first? That would be quicker, because then the stored doses could be distributed to doctors' surgeries and vaccination centres within a few days.

Or would it be better to switch to BA.4/5? But then Biontech and Moderna would have to collect additional study data and present it to the EMA, as well as change production. That would take at least another one to two months. However, Biontech could probably deliver a booster adapted to BA4/5 as early as October.
However, this would probably mean that most of the doses that have been stored for months would be thrown away.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Aug, 2022 05:29 am
Quote:
CDC eases Covid guidelines, noting virus is ‘Here to Stay’
The new guidelines eliminate quarantines and put less emphasis on social distancing,
routine surveillance testing and contact tracing


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention loosened Covid-19 guidelines on Thursday, freeing schools and businesses from the onus of requiring unvaccinated people exposed to the virus to quarantine at home.

The changes are a sharp move away from measures such as social distancing requirements and quarantining, which had polarized much of the country, and effectively acknowledge the way many Americans have been navigating the pandemic for some time. The agency’s action comes as children across the country return to school and many offices have reopened.

“We know that Covid-19 is here to stay,” Greta Massetti, a CDC epidemiologist, said at a news briefing on Thursday. “High levels of population immunity due to vaccination and previous infection, and the many tools that we have available to protect people from severe illness and death, have put us in a different place.”

The CDC’s new guidelines come after more than two years of a pandemic in which more than one million Americans have died. With the highly contagious BA.5 subvariant of Omicron spreading, the United States is recording more than 100,000 cases and nearly 500 deaths a day on average.

But many Americans dispensed with practices such as social distancing, quarantine and mask-wearing long ago.

“I think they are attempting to meet up with the reality that everyone in the public is pretty much done with this pandemic,” said Michael T. Osterholm, an infectious disease expert at the University of Minnesota, referring to the CDC.

The agency has been working for months on the new guidance, which builds on previous recommendations issued in February, when the agency shortened isolation times for many Americans. The CDC said it is making changes now because vaccination and prior infections have granted many Americans some degree of protection against the virus, and treatments, vaccines and boosters are available to reduce the risk of severe illness.

The changes shift much of the responsibility for risk reduction from institutions to individuals. The CDC no longer recommends that people stay six feet away from others. Instead, it notes that avoiding crowded areas and maintaining a distance from others are strategies that people may want to consider in order to reduce their risk.

And the recommended prevention strategies no longer draw a distinction between people who are up-to-date on their vaccinations and those who are not, streamlining a complicated set of rules that could be difficult for schools and businesses to navigate.

People who are exposed to the virus no longer must quarantine at home regardless of their vaccination status, although they should wear a mask for 10 days and get tested for the virus on day 5, according to the new guidelines. Contact tracing and routine surveillance testing of people without symptoms are no longer recommended in most settings.
(nyt)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2022 06:44 am
Olympic canoeing silver medallist in Rio de Janeiro, Steffi Kriegerstein (Germany), has ended her career due to the long-term consequences of a Covit-19 infection.
The 29-year-old made the announcement in Dresden today. "Despite all the health problems, I tried to get fit again last year. But I realised that this jump to return to competitive sport is huge." She said it had become apparent that her body could not handle the strain. "That's why I pulled the ripcord," Kriegerstein said one day before the start of the European Canoe Championships taking place in Munich.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2022 01:09 pm
Quote:
Why a Century-Old Vaccine Offers New Hope Against Pathogens
The B.C.G. tuberculosis vaccine may protect against Covid-19 and other
infections by broadly bolstering the immune system


In the early days of the Covid-19 pandemic, when prevention seemed light years away, several scientists launched trials to see whether a tuberculosis vaccine developed in the early 1900s might protect people by bolstering the immune system.

The Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin vaccine has long been known to have broad effects on the immune system, and is still given to infants in the developing world and in countries where TB is prevalent.

Scientists observed many years ago that the vaccine seems to train the immune system to respond to a variety of infectious diseases, including viruses, bacteria and parasites, and reduces infant mortality.

As new threats like monkeypox and polio re-emerge and the coronavirus continues to evolve, the potential of the old vaccine to provide a measure of universal protection against infectious diseases has gained renewed interest among scientists.

Now the results of clinical trials conducted during the pandemic are coming in, and the findings, while mixed, are encouraging.

The latest results, published Monday in Cell Medicine Reports, come from a trial initiated before Covid-19 emerged. It was designed to see whether multiple B.C.G. injections could benefit people with Type 1 diabetes, who are highly susceptible to infection.

In January 2020, as the pandemic began, the investigators started tracking Covid infections among the trial's 144 participants. All of them had Type 1 diabetes; two-thirds had received at least three B.C.G. doses before the pandemic. The remaining one-third had received multiple placebo injections.

The scientists are still evaluating the vaccine’s long-term effects on Type 1 diabetes itself. But they commissioned an independent group to look at Covid infections among the participants for 15 months, before any of them had received Covid vaccines.

The results were dramatic: only one — or slightly more than 1 percent — of the 96 people who had received the B.C.G. doses developed Covid, compared with six — or 12.5 percent — of the 48 participants who received dummy shots.

Although the trial was relatively small, “the results are as dramatic as for the Moderna and Pfizer mRNA vaccines,” said Dr. Denise Faustman, the study’s lead author and director of immunobiology at Massachusetts General Hospital.

People with Type 1 diabetes are particularly prone to infections. “We saw a major decrease in bladder infections, less flu and fewer colds, less respiratory tract infections and less sinus infections that diabetics get a lot of,” Dr. Faustman added.

The vaccine “seems to be resetting the immune response of the host to be more alert, to be more primed, not as sluggish.”

Another trial of B.C.G. in 300 older Greek adults, all of whom had health problems like heart or lung disease, found that the BCG vaccine reduced Covid-19 infections by two-thirds and lowered rates of other respiratory infections, as well.

Only two individuals who received the vaccine were hospitalized with Covid-19, compared with six who received the placebo shots, according to the study, published in July in Frontiers in Immunology.

“We have seen clear immunological effects of B.C.G., and it’s tempting to ask if we could use it — or other vaccines that induce training effects on immunity — against a new pathogen that emerges in the future, that is unknown and that we don’t have a vaccine for,” said Dr. Mihai Netea, the paper’s co-principal author and a professor at Radboud University Medical Center in the Netherlands.

He called the results of the Type 1 diabetes trial “very strong,” but urged caution, noting that other trials have had disappointing results. A Dutch study of some 1,500 health care workers who were vaccinated with B.C.G. found no reduction in Covid infections, and a South African study of 1,000 health care workers found no impact of B.C.G. on Covid incidence or severity.

The results of the largest trial of B.C.G., an international study that followed over 10,000 health care workers in Australia, the Netherlands, the U.K., Spain and Brazil for a year, are still being analyzed and are expected in the next few months. The study also followed health care workers after they received Covid vaccines to see if B.C.G. improved their responses.

“B.C.G. is a controversial area — there are believers and nonbelievers,” said the chief investigator of that trial, Dr. Nigel Curtis, a professor of pediatric infectious diseases at the University of Melbourne in Australia and leader of Murdoch Children’s Research Institute’s Infectious Diseases Group. (Dr. Curtis calls himself “an agnostic.”)

“Nobody argues that there are off-target effects, but how profound is that, and does it translate to a clinical effect? And is it confined to neonates, whose immune systems are more susceptible? These are very different questions,” Dr. Curtis said.

A number of factors could explain the disparate findings. B.C.G. is composed of a live attenuated bacterium that has been cultivated in labs around the world for decades, introducing mutations that make for different strains.

Dr. Faustman’s lab uses the Tokyo strain, which is considered particularly potent, Dr. Curtis said. His own studies used the Denmark strain, which is easiest to obtain. The number of doses may also have an effect on immunity, as many vaccines require repeated inoculations to maximize protection.

Dr. Faustman said her work has shown that it takes time for the vaccine to have its maximal effect. Type 1 diabetes patients in her study had received several B.C.G. shots before the pandemic.

In any case, scientists interested in B.C.G.’s potential to provide universal, broad-spectrum protection against pathogens have recast their aims. They are no longer looking at preventing Covid-19, since the current vaccines are very effective.

Instead, they want to develop tools for use in the next pandemic, which could be another coronavirus, a deadly new strain of influenza or an unknown pathogen.

“It is more for the future,” said Dr. Netea, who has called for conducting large clinical trials of B.C.G. and other vaccines that have demonstrated broad protective effects.

“If we had known this at the very beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, we would have been able to obtain a large protective effect on the population during the first year of the pandemic.”

The Open Source Pharma Foundation, a global nonprofit that seeks to develop affordable new therapies in the areas of greatest need, is interested in repurposing off-patent vaccines for use in current and future pandemics, said its chairman and co-founder Jaykumar Menon.

“Imagine if we could use existing vaccines to curb pandemics — that would change world history,” Mr. Menon said, adding that B.C.G. is not the only vaccine with wide effects on the immune system.

“These narrow, very specific vaccines, like the Pfizer or Moderna mRNA vaccines, are homed in very tightly on the spike protein of the virus that causes Covid-19, but if that protein mutates — which it does — you lose efficacy,” Mr. Menon said.

The alternative? “A broad universal vaccine that works on innate immunity puts up this fortified moat that repels all comers,” he said.
(nyt)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 07:07 am
Moderna says its pharma competitors used mRNA technology that it had developed years before the pandemic. The lawsuit has been filed in a US District Court in Massachusetts and the Regional Court of Düsseldorf.

Moderna sues Pfizer/BioNTech for patent infringement over COVID vaccine

Pfizer and Biontech are already facing several lawsuits from other companies claiming that the partnership's vaccine infringes their patents. Among others, the German company Curevac also filed a lawsuit against Biontech in Germany in July.

Pfizer/Biontech have stated that they will vigorously defend their patents.

Moderna, in turn, has also been sued in the United States for patent infringement and is in an ongoing dispute with the U.S. National Institutes of Health over the rights to mRNA technology.
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 08:57 am
I’ve had four vaccines and woke up sick at 3AM, COVID test came back positive. Now we all have to quarantine for five days. It feels like a mild flu and we’ve all been vaccinated so I’m not too concerned.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 09:25 am
@jcboy,
Glad to hear it's so mild, jc. That appears to be the way these last two versions affect most people. We haven't had it yet, but likely will, at some point. Just about everyone I know has had it.
jcboy
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 09:33 am
@Mame,
Most people I know have had it, I believe everyone is going to get it so some extent, thankfully we've all been vaccinated. I'm just on over the counter medication.

I know quite a few that have had it more than once, but they also got vaccinated so it was mild.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 09:34 am
@Mame,

i keep wondering if i already had a no-symptoms version.

i did a lot of train travel in '20 and '21...
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 09:37 am
@Mame,
I had nothing when I was infected, Mrs Walter had minor flu-like symtoms. But even the 100-years old lady we care for had had only flu-like symptoms (she was the first who got it, in the day care, most probably).
All of us twice vaccinated plus two boosters.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 11:02 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I'm so sick of all the 'getting sick' news. I'm happy that many people got the vaccines but I'm really anxious to say 'Bye Bye' to COVID.

P.S I don't mean the people who have gotten sick, it's just awful that so many people have actually gotten sick......
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 11:41 am
I read 'somewhere' that 70% of the people who don't think they've had it are wrong.

Sorry for the lack of source.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 03:03 pm
@roger,
My husband and I were in Tennessee and Mississippi late January 2020 for 10 days. We attended a very over-crowded International Blues Competition on Beale Street. We hadn't heard that much about the coronavirus to that point. In March, he was remarking to a friend that when we returned from that trip, we were both fatigued. I don't remember that, but if it's true, we were lucky to have escaped Delta with just that. That was the deadliest variant, with all the upper respiratory problems.
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  4  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 06:28 pm
After 4 vaccinations it’s kicking my ass today, get vaccinated!
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 07:00 pm
@jcboy,
I have two vaccinations and two boosters. You're scaring me.
jcboy
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2022 07:07 pm
@roger,
Keep hydrated, lots of water, 8 glasses a day, I’ve never felt this bad before.
0 Replies
 
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jcboy
 
  3  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2022 05:20 am
The first day with COVID was pretty bad I couldn’t even eat I just drank water all day and stayed in bed, now on the second day no fever just feeling a little achy and a cough. I can’t imagine how bad it could have been if I hadn’t been vaccinated.
jcboy
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2022 04:28 pm
@jcboy,
Four hours after making this post that flu came back again and hit me like a mack truck.

I made a post on Facebook for those that caught COVID after being fully vaccinated and everyone that commented had different symptoms, some mild some severe flu like symptoms. Some had it a week others longer. One friend of mine in Florida said he’s had it on and off since the 4th of July!

So whatever you do don’t let your guard down, mask up and social distance, this isn’t fun.
 

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