37
   

Coronavirus

 
 
izzythepush
 
  6  
Reply Sat 23 Oct, 2021 03:34 pm
@Glennn,
That's because nobody knows what the **** you're talking about, least of all you.
Glennn
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 23 Oct, 2021 03:59 pm
@izzythepush,
Quote:
I don't pay any attention to what he says

Yeah, I know. Fortunately, I did. That's why I can ask why he remained quiet as labs around the world used an inappropriate test to determine the level of spread, and no one has an answer. Why do you think no one has an answer?
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 24 Oct, 2021 07:25 pm
The Novavax vaccine might not overcome its manufacturing difficulties until the end of 2022:

https://www.politico.com/news/2021/10/19/novavax-vaccine-rush-process-global-campaign-516298
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2021 02:38 pm
Apparently China is running a disinformation campaign to make search engines point to the US as the source of the Coronavirus outbreak.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2021/10/05/china-is-exploiting-search-engines-push-propaganda-about-origins-covid-19-study-finds/
Mame
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Oct, 2021 03:34 pm
@engineer,
Not surprising.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2021 01:59 pm

'Unverified and dubious'
POFMA directive issued to anti-vaccine website Truth Warriors

(yahoo news)
Glennn
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 26 Oct, 2021 04:34 pm
@Region Philbis,
Yes, that's a very important thing to bring to everyone's attention. When you're debating this stuff, you'd better be able to prove what you say. If you don't, you'll be asked to correct yourself in public, pretty much just like . . . here.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Wed 27 Oct, 2021 01:20 am
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
I'm going to get my next two boosters from Pfizer-BioNTech and Johnson & Johnson if I can.

Then after that, hopefully Oxford-AstraZeneca and Novavax will be approved in the US and I can get them as well.

Since my first two shots were Moderna, that will get me a bit of variety.

Each vaccine challenges the immune system in a slightly different way, so getting a variety of vaccines will broaden my immune system's ability to detect Covid-19.

Ideally I'll rotate through all five vaccines over and over again. That's what I'm hoping to be able to do at least.

I'm modifying my thinking a bit. In addition to rotating between vaccines, I also think it will be best to alternate between "viral vector vaccines" and "mRNA/protein vaccines".

So since I had an Moderna to start, now I should do Johnson & Johnson (as the only viral vector vaccine for Covid currently approved in the US). Then Pfizer-BioNTech. Then Oxford-AstraZeneca (which will hopefully be approved by then). Then Novavax (which will hopefully be approved by then). Then Johnson & Johnson again. Then back around to Moderna. Then Oxford-AstraZeneca again, etc.
Glennn
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 27 Oct, 2021 08:40 am
Maybe tony will be given another prize, this time for an IV slow-drip of the experimental injection that will fit neatly into backpacks for both kids and adults.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2021 06:18 am
A controversial petition for a referendum on the dissolution of the Bavarian parliament has failed miserably: within two weeks, only 204,135 people signed up in town halls all over Bavaria - one million would have been needed.

Behind the referendum, which was unprecedented in the history of the Free State Bavaria, were bitter opponents of the Corona policy, especially from the so-called lateral thinkers ("Querdenker") scene.
At least one of those responsible for the referendum has even been targeted by the State Office for the Protection of the Constitution: the deputy representative of the referendum, Karl Hilz, is considered by the agency to have "Security-threatening anti-democratic aspirations".
The party Action for Germany ("AfD"), which is itself a member of the state parliament, decided at a state party conference the weekend before last to support the petition for a referendum.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2021 09:49 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Germany is planning to lift the national "state of emergency" imposed last year to combat the COVID pandemic. But life won't go back to normal just yet. Instead, the "state of emergency" will become a "state of caution."

But: hospitals in Germany risk seeing ICU beds as full as they were at the height of the pandemic. Coronavirus infections and hospitalisations have spiked in recent days.
0 Replies
 
ManOfTruth
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2021 03:36 pm
Absolute lunacy, and NOT supported by the will of the people as evidenced by the nearly 5,000 downthumbs vs. under 500 upthumbs on this video.

Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine could be available soon for kids ages 5 to 11


0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2021 05:54 am
Quote:
...and NOT supported by the will of the people as evidenced by the nearly 5,000 downthumbs vs. under 500 upthumbs on this video.

Sounds like this person is unfamiliar with the reasons that make self-selected surveys, like youtube polls, invalid. Or they might simply be blatantly attempting to use this meaningless tally as propaganda.

Quote:
Self-selection bias occurs when individuals select themselves to be included in a survey.

For example, suppose a local government mails out a survey to all of its residents asking them whether or not they think a new intersection should be placed in the middle of the town.

Residents who drive through that particular part of town often and residents who have to deal with daily traffic are more likely to hold a strong opinion about a new intersection and are far more likely to actually respond to the survey.

On the other hand, residents who work from home or simply have no interest in the happenings around the town are unlikely to take the time to respond to the survey.

Thus, the percentage of individuals in the survey who are in favor of the new intersection is unlikely to match the percentage of all residents in the town who are in favor of the new intersection.

• Self-Selection Bias: When individuals select themselves to be included in a survey.

• This results in a sample of individuals that is not representative of the overall population.

• This makes it difficult to generalize the findings from the sample to the population.

In other words, there is bias in our sample data. This makes it difficult to generalize the findings from the sample data to the overall population of interest.

Examples of Self-Selection Bias

The following examples illustrate a few scenarios where self-selection bias is likely to occur.

Example 1: Test Prep

Suppose a teacher wants to know if a new test prep course helps students improve test scores. She posts a sign-up sheet outside of her classroom and lets students decide if they’d like to participate in the course.

Self-selection bias is likely to occur because students who are more studious are more likely to sign up which means the sample of students who take the course aren’t likely to match the overall population of students who could potentially take the course.

Example 2: Multiple Languages

Suppose a local government mails out a survey asking its residents if they should include other languages besides English on street signs to make it easier for people who speak other languages to navigate around town.

Self-selection bias is likely to occur because only residents who can actually read English will respond to the survey. This means the opinions of survey respondents are unlikely to match the opinions of all residents in the town.

Example 3: Biology Research

Suppose a biologist is trying to estimate the average height of a certain species of deer so she places a certain deer feed in an open meadow and takes pictures of the deer that enter the meadow to eat the food.

In this example, self-selection bias is likely to occur because only the deer who like that type of deer feed or who are more comfortable with being out in the open are likely to enter the meadow and thus be included in the sample data.

Thus, it’s unlikely that the average height of deer in this sample will match the average height of deer in the overall population.

Why Self-Selection Bias is a Problem

Self-selection bias is a problem because it causes the individuals in the sample to not be representative of the population.

Recall that the purpose of collecting sample data is to use it to draw conclusions about some population of interest. However, we can only draw valid conclusions if we use a representative sample.

• Representative sample: A sample in which the characteristics of the individuals closely match the characteristics of the overall population.

Ideally we would like the sample to be like a “mini version” of the population. This allows us to be confident about using the sample to draw conclusions about the population.

How to Reduce Self-Selection Bias

The obvious way to reduce self-selection bias is to not give individuals the ability to select themselves to be included in a survey.

Ideally, a probability sampling method should be used to obtain a sample.

• Probability sampling method: A sampling method in which each member in a population has an equal probability of being selected to be in the sample.

Examples of probability sampling methods include:

1. Simple random sample: Randomly select individuals through the use of a random number generator or some means of random selection.

2. Systematic random sample: Put every member of a population into some order. Choose a random starting point and select every nth member to be in the sample.

3. Stratified random sample: Split a population into groups. Randomly select some members from each group to be in the sample.

4. Cluster random sample: Split a population into clusters. Randomly select some clusters and use each individual in the chosen clusters to be in the sample.

Each of these methods is likely to produce samples that are representative of the population we’re interested in, which allows us to generalize the findings from the sample data to the population.

statology
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2021 05:56 am
A new SARS-CoV-2 variant with high lethality poorly detected by RT-PCR on nasopharyngeal samples: an observational study

0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2021 01:24 pm
Quote:
CDC: Vaccination protects against Covid more strongly than previous infection

The team said their findings should help settle debates over whether people who have been infected should bother
getting vaccinated. They should, the researchers said.

People who had not been vaccinated and who ended up in the hospital were five times more likely to have Covid-19
than people who had been vaccinated within the past three to six months, they found...
(cnn)
Glennn
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2021 02:53 pm
@Region Philbis,
Could you link to the study?
roger
 
  3  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2021 03:12 pm
@Glennn,
He did. The 'CNN' at the end of the post is the link.
Glennn
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2021 03:27 pm
@roger,
He linked to a CNN article, not the study it talks about.
ManOfTruth
 
  -4  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2021 03:52 pm
@Glennn,
Quote:
He linked to a CNN article, not the study it talks about.


That's correct, and CNN are known liars.
0 Replies
 
ManOfTruth
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2021 04:45 pm
@Glennn,
Quote:
He linked to a CNN article, not the study it talks about.


He's a liar so he won't be able to provide a source, just watch.
0 Replies
 
 

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