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Who is Elizabeth Warren?

 
 
JTT
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 12:31 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
But there will be trials for those of the usa government that planned and blew up WTCs 1, 2 & 7, Finn. The evidence is absolutely overwhelming. Might as well look at it now rather than later. I know, it's hard to admit that your governments could be this evil.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 12:31 pm
@revelette1,
Your assessment of his demeanor matches mine and a lot of your fellow Democrats. Could it be anti-Semitism or anti-New York (I know he's lived in Vermont for decades but he sounds 100% New Yawkuh)? I suspect that there is some of that but by no means the driving force.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 12:41 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Pitty that.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 12:42 pm
@Olivier5,
One t, Olivier. It's pi ty not pit ty.
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 02:03 pm
@JTT,
Thanks.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 03:09 pm
@Olivier5,
You are most welcome, Olivier. My purpose in life is to help you know the truth.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 03:13 pm
Does Elizabeth Warren Have a Critical Vulnerability?

She has struggled with white, working-class voters like those important to winning Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin.

Quote:
ORLEANS, Mass. — I have voted two times for Elizabeth Warren to represent Massachusetts in the Senate. I would certainly vote for her for president over Donald Trump. But as the Democratic primary unfolds and she extends a steady rise in the polls, I keep coming back to a political vulnerability of which many followers of Massachusetts politics are aware but others may not be.

The problem is that she has a relatively weak standing in Massachusetts with non-college-educated working-class voters, and especially white workers. These voters are critical, especially in the Midwest and in states crucial to Mr. Trump’s victory like Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

You might call it the Warren Paradox. Her core message as a politician — that America has become rigged in favor of the very wealthy, and the rich get richer as the rest of us get shafted — is very much aimed at the working class. What’s more, her personal narrative, of her rise from “the ragged edge of the middle class” in her native Oklahoma, as she has put it, to professional success and acclaim in the fields of education and government might seem to embody a character trait of grit that appeals to blue-collar workers.

Yet while all of the major Democratic presidential candidates face difficulty with this constituency, polls suggest that this is especially a problem for Ms. Warren. For example, in a Fox survey, she drew 33 percent of white, non-college respondents in a matchup against President Trump, versus 38 percent for Joe Biden and 37 percent for Bernie Sanders. For Democrats to feel fully confident about nominating Ms. Warren as their standard-bearer, she needs to figure out this puzzle.

In Massachusetts, the Warren Paradox can be glimpsed in towns like Rockland, population near 18,000, a suburb about 20 miles south of Boston, overwhelmingly white and working class. In her November 2018 Senate race against a pro-Trump Republican, Ms. Warren won 60 percent of the vote statewide but only 44 percent of the vote in Rockland. By contrast, northwest of Boston, in the upscale suburb of Lexington, where the median home value is $1.15 million, (compared with $340,000 in Rockland), Ms. Warren took 74 percent of the vote.

On a recent visit to Rockland, I encountered a sentiment that her policies to address economic hardships might actually penalize those who have played by the rules. In a conversation in the parking lot of a McDonald’s, a young mother, after depositing her two children into the back seat of her car, said she viewed as unfair Ms. Warren’s proposal to forgive college student loans for most people carrying such debt. Now a manager at a local restaurant, she said she had attended a technical institute after high school and duly paid off her loans. “Probably,” she told me, she would vote for Mr. Trump for delivering on his promise to create more jobs.

I also came across what certainly sounded like, although it was not overtly expressed, reluctance to embracing her because she is a woman. “I can’t even listen to her. I just shut it off” — the television — “when she comes on,” a man at Uptown’s Finest Barbershop told me.

In part, Ms. Warren is afflicted by an authenticity problem with these voters. A former Harvard law professor, she is viewed by some, whatever her declared agenda, as typical of an elite that is out of touch with the concerns of ordinary working people. Doubts about her genuineness are nourished by her claim of Native American ancestry — which her detractors in Massachusetts have long framed as a dubious attempt to elevate her career prospects over equally qualified white job candidates. In 2012, Scott Brown, her Republican opponent in her first Senate race, tried to use this issue against her.

These misgivings feed a conviction that she doesn’t have Rockland’s back — a belief common to white non-college voters, often held against the Democratic Party in general. “She’ll tax me,” insisted a 49-year-old high school graduate who works at a town agency. (Ms. Warren’s proposed wealth tax targets only households with assets exceeding $50 million.)

“She wants to have open borders,” he added, voicing another reason that some people in Rockland think a President Warren won’t protect them. (Like a number of the Democratic presidential candidates, Ms. Warren is in favor of decriminalizing unauthorized border crossings.) And the sense that Ms. Warren, who has voted in Congress for a ban on assault weapons, is soft on gun rights also plays into the notion that she would leave Rockland unprotected. The 49-year-old voted for Mr. Trump in 2016 and fully plans to do so again in 2020, with the “good job” the president is doing on the economy. (After speaking to me, he climbed into a car with a National Rifle Association sticker affixed to the back windshield.)

As Ms. Warren’s Senate campaigns attest, she is by no means uniformly unpopular in Rockland or, for that matter, in neighboring communities with a similar socio-economic profile.

“I love Elizabeth Warren,” said a welder and member of a plumbers union local, age 68, by phone. “She’s my bulldog. She is 100 percent for us — for the working man, the exploited person, the underdog.” He is from Weymouth, next door to Rockland. “If she were a man, they would love her.” He paused. “Or they would like her more.”

As he explained, places like Rockland, on the South Shore of Massachusetts, need to be understood as products of “white flight” from Boston, following court-ordered school busing in the mid-1970s.

Should she win the Democratic nomination, it’s easy to see the difficulties she will face in gaining the allegiance of the white working class in a matchup with Mr. Trump. White flight also defines a number of working-class suburbs in the Midwest, as in the metropolitan Detroit region.

But even though the Warren Paradox will be a real challenge, she still has the opportunity to impress potentially unreceptive voters with her “bulldog” tenacity, as in her visit this year to a small town in West Virginia to talk about the opioid crisis — a state, 93 percent white, taken by Mr. Trump in 2016 by nearly 42 points. She has also put gut economic issues at the centerpiece of her agenda: For instance, her “Plan for Economic Patriotism,” an industrial-policy tack calling for such steps as “more actively managing” the currency value of the dollar “to promote exports and domestic manufacturing” and a tenfold increase in government spending on job apprenticeship programs, won praise from the Fox News commentator Tucker Carlson. “It’s just pure old-fashioned economics: how to preserve good-paying American jobs,” he told his audience, a form of “economic nationalism.”

And to be sure, while white working-class voters get a great deal of attention in battleground states like Michigan, if Democrats can increase turnout among African-American voters in 2020, that would help counterbalance any weakness among white working-class voters.

As I was reminded in Rockland, the task of beating Mr. Trump doesn’t require passion for the president’s challenger, whoever that may be. The president, too, arouses a visceral dislike among some people there. One man, a Vietnam veteran who works at the American Legion post in Rockland, screwed up his face at my mention of the president. Among the things he finds unappealing is Mr. Trump’s disdainful posture toward the news media. We chatted about the fractious state of American politics at the Rockland Bar and Grill, as he sipped his Guinness. “If it’s down to Trump and Warren, it’s definitely Warren,” he declared without hesitation. Ms. Warren versus Mr. Trump would be a grind, but that, it might be said, is the story of her life.

nyt
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  0  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 03:28 pm
@Olivier5,
I feel the same way.

He’s not polished, he’s not a people pleaser by any stretch. He’s been saying the same damn thing for generations. He hasn’t changed his truth to appeal. His truth as it has been finally did appeal.

He’s a miracle.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 03:33 pm
@Lash,
Might this be the morally reprehensible post that Bernie Latham warned us we would see from you in the coming months, Lash? Bernie sure does say a lot of really stupid things, doesn't he?
0 Replies
 
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 03:37 pm
@Lash,
Only with the chicken in every pot, a car in every garage people who believe he can deliver this stuff with an unfriendly congress. He ant a democrat and the party will stymie him just as it did with democrat Obama because it has become a party of the rich just like the republicans. Both give to big business and vice versa.
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 03:44 pm
Bernie is the only democrat who can beat trump.

Remember how Hillary did so incredibly well in polls? Several here can still find their own posts saying anyone who thought trump had a chance was a fool. Watch the crowds they pull.

Warren has 0 black support, like Buttigieg.
Trump will mop the floor with Biden.
Bernie is the only one who has a good chance to beat trump.

Don’t throw away another election.

You have never seen the likes of Bernie Sanders with the bully pulpit. He will astonish you. He will help us stop the madness and save our planet. He’ll be a president we can be proud of.
JTT
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 03:46 pm
@RABEL222,
Such as it has always been, Rabel, with highly gullible people like yourself feeding the kleptocracy. Remember Democrat politicians supported Bush's 9-11 conspiracy theory too even though it has no evidence to support it. That tells you right there how these are nothing but gangsters who switch off every few years.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 04:05 pm
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

I feel the same way.

He’s not polished, he’s not a people pleaser by any stretch. He’s been saying the same damn thing for generations. He hasn’t changed his truth to appeal. His truth as it has been finally did appeal.

He’s a miracle.


Whether or not that is the case, we are now in the Age of Obama & Trump.
Bernie's lack of charisma and pizzazz is and will continue to hurt him.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 04:06 pm
@Lash,
How much support does Sanders have among black voters?

Let's see some reputable data and not simply the assurances of his #1 Cheerleader here.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 04:08 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Do you know of google and other search engines, Finn?
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 04:10 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Surely you are not suggesting Trump has charisma or pizzazz, are you? Oh wait, you are a Trump sycophant.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2019 03:40 am
@RABEL222,
Quote:
He ant a democrat and the party will stymie him just as it did with democrat Obama because it has become a party of the rich just like the republicans. Both give to big business and vice versa.

What do you think can be done about this? What's the way forward?
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2019 04:12 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
He got off to a bad start in '16 by inadvertently committing the most execrable political sin on the left — he suggested that "all lives matter". He's worked hard to win more black support this time and apparently has more black support than Harris but has still run into trouble. In one article I read the suggestion was that his message appealed more to "class" than to "race". The establishment Dems don't have this problem because they tend to shy away from making arguments based on class distinction — partly because they attract some very wealthy donors. I haven't seen anything which suggests that the DNC is using anti-semitism to lessen Sanders' potential appeal to black voters.

Sanders wrote:
We have got to look at candidates, you know, not by the color of their skin, not by their sexual orientation or their gender and not by their age. I think we have got to try to move us toward a nondiscriminatory society which looks at people based on their abilities, based on what they stand for.


I wonder if Sanders and his supporters would ever be able to look past people's incomes as well. How far does "non-discrimination" extend?

RABEL222
 
  4  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2019 10:31 am
@Olivier5,
First a democratic president. Than we need to elect more liberal thinking people to congress. Any democratic candidate for president keeping in mind without a more liberal congress his hands will be tied just as were Obama's. Make big business pay their share of taxes rather than this trickle down bullshyt the republicans have been passing off as good government when every one knows the majority of rich refuse to help anyone but themselves. In Trumps world wealth trickles down to their kids.
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2019 11:27 am
@RABEL222,
Quote:
Than we need to elect more liberal thinking people to congress.


Good people like AOC and Ilhan Omar. Both know who brought down the towers because unlike most Americans, they haven't swallowed the kool aid.
0 Replies
 
 

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