6
   

Trump's supporters want respect

 
 
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 25 Oct, 2018 07:29 pm
@katsung47,
Quote:
One man took McConnell’s to-go box off the table and dumped it on the sidewalk, reported the Courier Journal.
I wish people would press charges against these liberals so we could start sending them to prison.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Fri 2 Nov, 2018 12:50 am
Thank God we have so many beds available in prison, someone should do time for soiling a bag of carry-out Popeye's...we have to put our foot down, once and for all....LOCK THEM UP, LOCK THEM UP, LOCK THEM UP
0 Replies
 
katsung47
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 07:27 pm
Thousands signed a letter saying Trump was not welcome in Pittsburgh. He plans to visit anyway.
By Allyson Chiu and Amy B Wang October 29

More than 35,000 people have signed an open letter to President Trump from the leaders of a Pittsburgh-based Jewish group who say the president will not be welcome in the city unless he denounces white nationalism and stops “targeting” minorities after a mass shooting Saturday at a local synagogue left 11 dead.



https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2018/10/29/he-is-not-welcome-here-thousands-support-pittsburgh-jewish-leaders-calling-trump-denounce-white-nationalism/?utm_term=.1780cfc7a040
coldjoint
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 07:46 pm
@katsung47,
Quote:
Thousands signed a letter saying Trump was not welcome in Pittsburgh. He plans to visit anyway.
By Allyson Chiu and Amy B Wang October 29

Old news, old hate, and not from Trump.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2018 12:35 am
The truth is that Trump supporters don't really want respect, they want to be feared....thats what they think is power....not education, not patriotism or service, screw that, it's fear.
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2018 05:38 pm
@glitterbag,
The sad part is that the conservatives spreading this b s think it is engendering fear rather than disgust in everyone but conservatives.
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 12 Nov, 2018 06:29 pm
@RABEL222,
Quote:
spreading this b s think it is engendering fear rather than disgust in everyone but conservatives.

Conservatives are smart enough not to confuse awareness with fear or project exactly what the Left does to conservatives. That is obvious.

The Weathermen were ready to kill 25 million people who would never agree with them if they ever gained that kind of power. That is the Left and the direction it is heading in.
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Nov, 2018 01:56 am
@coldjoint,
You are a frivolous man of no consequence. I would never refer to you as stupid, that is something the others can determine as they peruse your silliness.
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 14 Nov, 2018 12:26 pm
@glitterbag,
Quote:
You are a frivolous man of no consequence.

You are an arrogant old lady who cannot handle anything that approaches the truth. You ask for everything you get, and you always end up looking like a fool.

Anything else?
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Nov, 2018 04:18 pm
@coldjoint,
Glitter is right, as usual you are 100% wrong. Can't wait for your scintillating reply.
0 Replies
 
katsung47
 
  2  
Reply Wed 21 Nov, 2018 07:08 pm
Another Trump-branded building decided to take down the president's name

David A. Fahrenthold Washington Post Oct.17,2018

The residents of a Manhattan condominium called "Trump Place" have voted to remove the president's name from the tower's facade, the latest in a string of properties that have distanced themselves from the Trump brand since Election Day 2016.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-trump-place-name-20181017-story.html
coldjoint
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 21 Nov, 2018 07:43 pm
@katsung47,
Quote:
The residents of a Manhattan condominium called "Trump Place" have voted to remove the president's name from the tower's facade, the latest in a string of properties that have distanced themselves from the Trump brand since Election Day 2016.

I think you should ask Trump if he cares.
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  2  
Reply Wed 21 Nov, 2018 07:58 pm
I wonder if out of work coal mining Kentuckians still support Trump after this...


After federal court blocks Kentucky’s Medicaid work requirements, Trump admin reapproves them

By the state's own estimate, nearly 100,000 low-income people will lose health coverage.
AMANDA MICHELLE GOMEZ
NOV 21, 2018, 9:57 AM

The Trump administration permitted Kentucky again to require low-income people to report at least 80 hours of work or community engagement per month or lose coverage for six months, even after a federal judge blocked the state’s proposal over the summer.

A U.S. district court judge called Kentucky’s proposal, which includes work rules, “arbitrary and capricious” in June, noting that officials never adequately considered whether the plan actually provided coverage to residents — a central objective of Medicaid. Indeed, the policy was at odds with the Medicaid program, and the state itself said nearly 100,000 low-income people would drop coverage after five years. (Advocates say this is a conservative estimate too.) The judge gave the Trump administration and the administration of Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin (R) the opportunity to strength their justification.

The Trump administration did not appeal that June ruling and, instead, reopened Kentucky’s proposal for comment on how to proceed. The overwhelming majority of formal, stakeholder comments were negative and opposed work requirements. While the proposal didn’t change much, federal health officials reapproved it Tuesday night.

In addition to conditioning eligibility on reported work, Kentucky is also requiring beneficiaries to pay premiums ($1 dollar per month but cannot exceed 4 percent of the household income). Fail to pay premiums for 60 days and the state withholds health care. The state is also testing a six month non-eligibility period if residents fail to submit the appropriate paperwork during the annual redetermination process. Kentucky will exempt a few groups, like pregnant people, from the new rules.

There are a couple of new additions to the proposal, like Kentucky now has to submit an implementation proposal to the federal government, which wasn’t required before.

Federal officials warned they would not be discouraged by the outpour of criticism.

“I have heard the criticism and felt the resistance, but I reject the premise and here is why: It is not compassionate to trap people on government programs or create greater dependency on public assistance as we expand programs like Medicaid,” said federal Medicaid official Seema Verma in September.

Kentucky’s new rules will go into effect in April, barring any lawsuits. Law groups who sued the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) over Kentucky’s initial proposal appear set on fighting this one.

“We are disappointed that HHS is uninterested in facts and evidence developed in comments showing that a work requirement will result in individuals and families eligible for Medicaid losing that coverage, while increasing administrative costs of the program,” said Kentucky Equal Justice Center’s Senior Litigation and Advocacy Counsel Ben Carter in a statement. “As we have long-argued, Medicaid expansion in Kentucky is improving lives and health outcomes. The Bevin and Trump administrations are endangering that progress with repeated attempts to undue this work.”

“Same thing, different results: that’s what HHS hopes to achieve by reapproving Kentucky’s Medicaid waiver application without any meaningful changes,” said Sam Brooke, deputy legal director for the Southern Poverty Law Center, in a statement. “We intend to pursue the next court challenge as vigorously as we have before when we won. We have no reason to believe that the results will be any different this time.”

National Health Law Program, among the groups who sued the Trump administration on behalf of Kentuckians on Medicaid, is also suing over Arkansas’ Medicaid work requirements. Unlike Kentucky’s, Arkansas’ policy went into effect over the summer and already officials booted more than 12,000 from Medicaid.
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  2  
Reply Wed 21 Nov, 2018 08:23 pm
Seven things you may not know about Kentucky's biggest exports
Andrew Wolfson, Louisville Courier Journal Published 10:25 a.m. ET Aug. 16, 2018

Sen. Mitch McConnell says local companies have mixed reviews on the effect of tariffs during a press conference in Louisville. Aug. 10, 2018 Sam Upshaw Jr., Louisville Courier Journal

Far from either coast — or Canada or Mexico, Kentucky doesn't seem like it would be a big exporter of products abroad. But it is.

Kentucky in 2016 exported $29.2 billion in goods abroad, supporting an estimated 140,000 jobs.

Kentucky in 2016 was the 17th largest exporter of goods of the 50 states.
Exported goods accounted for 14.2 percent of the state's gross product in 2016.

The most valuable products were vehicles and other transportation equipment, $16.3 billion; chemicals, $4.2 billion; computer and electronic equipment, $1.6 billion; and machinery, $1.5 billion.

4,476 companies exported from Kentucky in 2015

The state's largest market in 2015 was Canada, following by the United Kingdom, France, Mexico and Brazil.

Kentucky was the nation's 20th largest agricultural export state, shipping $2.1 billion in goods in 2015. Leaders were soybeans, $426 million; livestock, $404 million; and tobacco, $263 million.
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  2  
Reply Wed 21 Nov, 2018 08:24 pm
U.S. government to pay $4.7 billion in tariff-related aid to farmers
3 MIN READ

CHICAGO (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Monday its farm aid package would include $4.7 billion in direct payments to farmers to help offset losses from retaliatory tariffs on American exports this season.

The bulk of the payments, $3.6 billion, would be made to soybean farmers. That amounts to $1.65 per bushel multiplied by 50 percent of expected production, Undersecretary for Farm Production and Conservation Bill Northey said on a conference call.

China has traditionally bought about 60 percent of U.S. soybean exports. But it has been largely out of the market since implementing tariffs on U.S. imports in retaliation for the Trump administration’s tariffs on Chinese goods.

“An announcement about further payments will be made in the coming months if warranted,” Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said.

The aid package, announced at $12 billion in July, will also include payments for sorghum of 86 cents per bushel multiplied by 50 percent of production, 1 cent per bushel of corn, 14 cents per bushel of wheat, and 6 cents per pound of cotton.

Payments for hog farmers will be $8 per pig multiplied by 50 percent of Aug. 1 production, while dairy farmers will receive 12 cents per hundred weight of production, Northey said.

Sign-up for the program will begin on Sept. 4, to coincide with the 2018 harvest, and end in January. Farmers will need to present production evidence to collect payments and payments are capped at $125,000 per person.

The program will also include $1.2 billion in purchases of commodities, including pork and dairy products, to be spread out over several months, Undersecretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Greg Ibach said.

“The specific commodities to be purchased are those that have been impacted by the unfair tariffs that have been imposed by other nations,” he said.

The program will also include some $200 million for a trade promotion program to develop new markets.

Crops rot in U.S.-China trade war
The package has been seen as a temporary boost to farmers as the United States and China negotiate trade issues. It has divided Republicans, some of whom favor free trade and were troubled by what they viewed as the kind of welfare programs their party has traditionally opposed. It has also faced skepticism from some farmers, a key Trump constituency.

“Short-term aid does not create long-term market stability,” said Doug Schroeder, Illinois Soybean Growers vice chairman, in a statement after the announcement. “Producers need trade, not aid.”
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Wed 21 Nov, 2018 10:40 pm
@neptuneblue,
ive found from experience in wool supports and 'check off programs' , that mrkets, once gone, rarely return when " normaliation returns. Trump, a general "know nothing" in economics, has dealt a major blow against our crop producers.

His "trade war" policy, has opened with major shots at our own farmers feet.
RABEL222
 
  3  
Reply Fri 23 Nov, 2018 01:31 am
@farmerman,
Your right. However the farmers in the midst of whom I live don't seem to realize what a screwing Trump is giving them. When I point this fact out to them rather than refute my facts with their own facts they bring up Hillary and Obama and the fact that since I am a liberal i am spreading fake news. I talk with farmers every day at the local coffee shop.
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 23 Nov, 2018 11:16 am
@RABEL222,
Quote:
rather than refute my facts with their own facts they bring up Hillary and Obama and the fact that since I am a liberal i am spreading fake news.

Farmers are experts on manure, they know all about the **** Obama and Killary have done to undermine this country.
RABEL222
 
  3  
Reply Fri 23 Nov, 2018 03:43 pm
@coldjoint,
Thank you cj. I was sure I could count on you for more BS.
coldjoint
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 23 Nov, 2018 04:03 pm
@RABEL222,
Quote:
Thank you cj. I was sure I could count on you for more BS.

Bet you were sure Killary was going to be president too.
 

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