261
   

Translate English into Latin

 
 
George
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 01:53 pm
@brandonpaulus,
Quote:
How do you say "Sons of" in Latin?

"Sons" is Filii.
The "of" is trickier. In Latin you would use the the genitive case, which is like
the possessive case in English. For example, "Sons of Mark" would be
"Filii Marci", where "Marci" is the genitive of "Marcus" (Mark).
0 Replies
 
Alexia14
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 03:47 pm
@George,
Thank you so much! ^_^ You are really good at latin, I love languages so I think it is really cool that you do this for fun btw Smile
George
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 03:48 pm
@Alexia14,
You're welcome, Alexia14.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 07:26 am
@Mortum,
> Make your dreams come true
Fac somnia tua vera esse

> ThereĀ“s so much more than this
Tanto amplius quam istud est

> A million ways to live
Decies centena milia modi vivendi


Mortum
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 11:20 am
@George,
Thanks man! You're almost finished.
By the way, am i right?
'Life. Way of Suffering' is 'Vita, Via Dolorosa' in latin
0 Replies
 
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 11:23 am
@Mortum,
> Unlock the door to the universe with love
Ostium mundi reclude amore

> Free your soul
Libera animam tuam
0 Replies
 
nlevhari
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:38 am
How do I translate:
'The Zeros make the Millions'
to latin?
and I have another one:
'Strength is a necessity because there will always be conflict.'
and another:
'Everything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.'
and another:
'Form is temporary. Class is permanent.'
just one more:
'Great minds think alike.'

thanks alot.
George
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 06:58 am
@nlevhari,
I'll try to address these one at a time.

> 'The Zeros make the Millions'
I don't know how to translate this into Latin.
There is no Latin word for zero (it's an Arabic numeral).
Latin would use "nihil" ("nothing") but that makes no sense in this context.

Back later . . .
0 Replies
 
George
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 07:36 am
@nlevhari,
> 'Strength is a necessity because there will always be conflict.'

Fortitudo necessitas est quia semper certamen erit
0 Replies
 
nlevhari
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 01:51 pm
Could you also translate ' Practice makes Perfect ' ?
George
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 01:58 pm
@nlevhari,
Quote:
Could you also translate ' Practice makes Perfect ' ?

Yes.
The Latin version of that is
Usus Promptos Facit
nlevhari
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 02:21 pm
@George,
If I were to say
'Per valde vox adveho valde officium'
Would that mean
'With great power comes great responsibility'?
And doesn't Practice makes perfect mean this:
'Meditor planto perficio'?
George
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:04 am
@nlevhari,
Actually both of those mean the same thing:
"Never trust an automated online translator."

Just kidding, of course, but you must have gotten those from such a site.
I'll be back to break them down for you in a little while.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:56 am
@nlevhari,
'Per valde vox adveho valde officium'
Per -- a preposition meaning (1) through, (2) during,
(3) with (in the sense of 'by means of'), (4) because of.
valde -- an adverb meaning greatly
vox -- a noun meaning voice
adveho -- a verb meaning I convey or I bring.
valde -- see above
officium -- a noun meaning duty or employment

'Meditor planto perficio'
Meditor -- a verb meaning (1) I think over, (2) I practice.
planto -- a verb meaning (1) I plant (2) I form or make.
perficio -- a verb meaning (1) I complete (2) I make perfect.
nlevhari
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 12:22 pm
@George,
Thought I could get an easy solution online Smile guess I can't.
Could you also translate 'With great power comes great responsibility' for me?
thanks again.
George
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 06:37 am
@nlevhari,
I'd say:

Cum magna potestate, magnum officium [venit].

I put 'venit' ('comes') in brackets because I think it is not needed.
rachierach
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Jul, 2009 06:04 pm
@George,
hiya xx

hope you dont mind me asking for one Smile

how would u say
"he who does not weep, does not see"

and
"I miss you Nanny"

thank you sooo much xxxx its very kind of you doin all this xx
George
 
  2  
Reply Wed 22 Jul, 2009 09:59 am
@rachierach,
"he who does not weep, does not see"
qui non lacrimat, non videt

"I miss you Nanny"
Te desidero, Nanny.
0 Replies
 
Sue K
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Jul, 2009 02:55 pm
Can anyone help me with a translation for:

Every Day is a Gift
and
Love This Life

George
 
  2  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 07:13 am
@Sue K,
Quote:
Every Day is a Gift
and
Love This Life

Every Day is a Gift
Quisque Dies Donum Est

Love This Life
Ama Hanc Vitam
 

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