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Bush supporters' aftermath thread

 
 
username removed 3 18 05
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2005 06:01 pm
Bush--a demented Nazi and ideal spokesperson for the bug-eyed religious filth inhabiting this utterly vile and worthless country. He is probably the MOST representative President America will ever know.
0 Replies
 
fishin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2005 06:05 pm
FreeDuck wrote:
And there we have a new argument technique by the cons. Define the position of the other side in the stupidest possible way so that if they don't respond at all, it sticks, and if they do respond other than expected it makes them look like bootlickers.


It was a tactic adopted from Dookiestix. Wink
0 Replies
 
timberlandko
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2005 06:38 pm
Lola wrote:
Can you believe there's no emoticon for love? I must object. How is a poster to indicate true love? xoxoxoxx


Here ya go, Lola


**********(¨`·.·´¨)*************
******(¨`·.·´¨).¸..(¨`·.·´¨)********
*(¨`·.·´*·. ¸.·´ ** `·.¸.·´ `·.·´¨)****
* `·.¸.·*Showin some love*.¸.·´**
*******(¨`·.·´¨) (¨`·.·´¨)*********
********`·.¸(¨`·.·´¨)..·´**********
************`·.¸.·´**************
0 Replies
 
Ethel2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2005 10:27 pm
timberlandko wrote:
Lola wrote:
Can you believe there's no emoticon for love? I must object. How is a poster to indicate true love? xoxoxoxx


Here ya go, Lola


**********(¨`·.·´¨)*************
******(¨`·.·´¨).¸..(¨`·.·´¨)********
*(¨`·.·´*·. ¸.·´ ** `·.¸.·´ `·.·´¨)****
* `·.¸.·*Showin some love*.¸.·´**
*******(¨`·.·´¨) (¨`·.·´¨)*********
********`·.¸(¨`·.·´¨)..·´**********
************`·.¸.·´**************


Love ya, Timber.

Now you'll have to teach me how to do that.

Let's all just fall in love and forget this stupid political bullshiza. Let's put a flower in our hair and sing, "Amazing Grace" with a warbly voice like Joan Biaz.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Mar, 2005 10:31 pm
They sat together in the park
As the evening sky grew dark,
She looked at him and he felt a spark tingle to his bones.
'Twas then he felt alone and wished that he'd gone straight
And watched out for a simple twist of fate.

They walked along by the old canal
A little confused, I remember well
And stopped into a strange hotel with a neon burnin' bright.
He felt the heat of the night hit him like a freight train
Moving with a simple twist of fate.

A saxophone someplace far off played
As she was walkin' by the arcade.
As the light bust through a beat-up shade where he was wakin' up,
She dropped a coin into the cup of a blind man at the gate
And forgot about a simple twist of fate.

He woke up, the room was bare
He didn't see her anywhere.
He told himself he didn't care, pushed the window open wide,
Felt an emptiness inside to which he just could not relate
Brought on by a simple twist of fate.

He hears the ticking of the clocks
And walks along with a parrot that talks,
Hunts her down by the waterfront docks where the sailers all come in.
Maybe she'll pick him out again, how long must he wait
Once more for a simple twist of fate.

People tell me it's a sin
To know and feel too much within.
I still believe she was my twin, but I lost the ring.
She was born in spring, but I was born too late
Blame it on a simple twist of fate.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Mar, 2005 10:07 am
He woke up, and the room was thick
Something there inside was making him sick.
He heard her bootheels in the hallway click,
The sun was coming up
She dropped a coin into the cup
of a blind man at the gate
And forgot about that simple twist of fate. Brussels: Something inside this room was making him sick
[...]
Hears those bootheels in the hallway click
Bursts the window open wide
Then throws it all up outside
You know it just could not wait.
All the time for that simple twist of fate.
[Head out to wind] and the rain and snow
[Didn't leave from far, where] the chilly winds blow
He said: "I've taught you all you know,
now, don't bother me no more.
You know where to find the door.
Go on before it's too late
and forget about that simple twist of fate." Wembley: He's walkin' out through the city streets
look into the eyes of the people he meets
And late in time, you know, [he tries and greets]
[he waited all I can do]
He said: "I'm leaving my heart with you"
Take good care of it, be on your freight"
All about that simple twist of fate.
People tell me it's a crime
To remember her for too long of a time.
She should have caught me in my prime,
She would have stayed with me.
Instead of going back off to sea,
and leaving me to meditate
all on that simple twist of fate.
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Mar, 2005 11:42 am
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Mar, 2005 11:48 am
Ticomaya wrote:
Quote:
"Little Eichmanns" and "Digital Brownshirts"
Deconstructing the Hitlerian slur


Victor Davis Hanson

Hitler hijacked an elected government


Without going to discuss the subject in the quotation, just a small correction:
Hitler didn't hijack any government at all but was democratically elected Crying or Very sad
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Mar, 2005 11:52 am
well yeah really, I am thinking that repubs should change their shirt colors, perhaps a nice soft pink with contrasting white collars and really folks, trash those Dockers you're beginning to look like you're all mormons out shopping for new bicycles, and get with it, trading your wing-tips for nikes really don't cut it either. Just keep this fashion statement in mind "Beige is not meant to be a personality."
vote early, vote often, vote Kucinich.
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Mar, 2005 04:14 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Ticomaya wrote:
"Little Eichmanns" and "Digital Brownshirts"
Deconstructing the Hitlerian slur


Victor Davis Hanson

Hitler hijacked an elected government


Without going to discuss the subject in the quotation, just a small correction:
Hitler didn't hijack any government at all but was democratically elected Crying or Very sad


I thought Hitler was appointed Chancellor by von Hindenburg ..... Question
0 Replies
 
PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Mar, 2005 03:48 am
username removed 3/18/05 wrote:
Bush--a demented Nazi and ideal spokesperson for the bug-eyed religious filth inhabiting this utterly vile and worthless country. He is probably the MOST representative President America will ever know.


Gee, I'm sure going to miss ol' what's-his-name...
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Mar, 2005 10:09 am
Do all liberals hate America, PD, or just you and Username Removed?
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Mar, 2005 10:22 am
Lash wrote:
Do all liberals hate America, PD, or just you and Username Removed?


You can add JTT to the list ....

http://www.able2know.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=1200980#1200980
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Mar, 2005 11:55 am
Funny thing about some of this stuff you read is that, deep down, liberals and dems aren't really anti-war at all, in fact they're every bit as blood-thirsty as you and I are; they simply prefer wars in which there is provably no cause and in which mainly innocent Christians are being killed:

1999 Drudge report:

Quote:


XXXXX DRUDGE REPORT XXXXX WEDNESDAY, JUNE 09 1999 00:14:03 UTC XXXXX

Anti-war activist Judy Collins is set this evening to sing at a gala White
House state dinner -- all the while, the US led NATO war against Yugoslavia
continues unrestrained.

Collins, who made her name over the last 35 years as a social conscience, is
known for her renditions of anti-war songs such as 'Masters of War', 'Song
For Sarajevo', 'Last Night I Had The Strangest Dream' and 'Fortune of Soldiers'.

Calls to Collins' label ELEKTRA asking for clarification on whether her fans
can still apply her passionate, idealistic songs to the current war in the
Balkans were unreturned.

Incidentally, tonight's dinner -- honoring the President of the Republic of
Hungary, Arpad Goncz and his wife, Mrs. Zsuzsanna Goncz -- features
a menu of Copper River Salmon with Portobello Mushroom, Roasted Onions and
Sweet Peppers, Fennel and Herb Salad, Toasted Caraway and Tomato Sauce, Pecan
Crusted Lamb, Wilted Summer Greens, Sweet Potato Flan, Barbequed Peach Ragout,
Salad of Bibb Lettuce, Asparagus and Avocado, Stilton Crisp, Tarragon
Grapefruit Dressing.

And for dessert: Bing Cherry Strudel Surprise and Creme Fraeche....

#####################################################
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2005 04:08 pm
Quote:
Friday March 25, 08:46 PM

Bush approval hits record low

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President George W. Bush's approval rating has slipped to a new low in the latest national survey with pollsters suggesting federal government intervention in the Terri Schiavo controversy may have been a factor along with growing concern about the economy.

The USA Today/CNN/Gallup survey released on Friday found 45 percent of the 1,001 adults surveyed Monday through Wednesday thought Bush was doing a good job, compared with 52 percent during three previous surveys in late February and early March.

The president's previous low since taking office in January 2001 was 46 percent in May 2004.

Bush's involvement in the Schiavo case in Florida "may be a major cause" for the 7-point drop, the Gallup Organization said.

Bush broke off his Texas vacation to sign emergency legislation on Monday that permitted federal courts to consider appeals by Schiavo's parents to force the reconnection of a feeding tube to prolong the life of the brain-damaged woman.

The tube was removed on March 18 with the permission of Schiavo's husband, who has been waging a long legal battle with his wife's family over whether the 41-year-old woman should be allowed to die.

So far, appeals by Schiavo's parents have failed. The U.S. Supreme Court refused to intervene on Thursday.

Separate polls by the Gallup organization, ABC News and CBS News in recent days showed large majorities of Americans were opposed to the congressional and presidential intervention in the Schiavo controversy.

Also possibly weighing on Bush's ratings slide is concern about the economy with new emphasis on rising fuel costs.

Fifty-nine percent of those surveyed believed the economy was getting worse, up 9 points from earlier this month. The overall figure is Bush's worst negative figure on the economy in two years.

Seventeen percent cited rising fuel costs as the most important economic problem facing the country, up from 5 percent a month ago.

Rising crude oil costs helped to push the national price for gasoline to a record $2.11 a gallon this week.
Source
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2005 04:13 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Friday March 25, 08:46 PM

Bush approval hits record low
....


I'll bet he doesn't get elected next time. Any takers?
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2005 04:16 pm
heh
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Apr, 2005 06:53 pm
According to the Rasmussen daily polls, GWB's approval rating is coming back up to pre-Terry Schiavo levels. Of course Zogby's poll indicates much more support for the president and Congress than was indicated in other polls on the Schiavo issue.

The following contains some interesting data though including some I bet both GOP and Dems will be paying attention to in 2006 and 2008:

JOHN FUND ON THE TRAIL

Bush Democrats
A detailed look at last year's voting suggests big Republican opportunities.

Monday, April 4, 2005 12:01 a.m. EDT

A treasure trove of data on the meaning of the 2004 presidential election has just been released, and you can bet that if reporters don't look at it carefully, strategists for potential candidates will. The 2004 election numbers may explain why Hillary Clinton is taking care to present herself as a centrist.

While we vote for president in local precincts and then see the election results reported by state and county, the way to get a feeling for the underlying trends of an election is to wait for the results to be broken down into the nation's 435 congressional districts. Only a handful of states adequately compile presidential election results by congressional districts. That's why political junkies appreciate the efforts of Polidata, a database firm run by Clark Bensen, which just spent months collecting precinct-level data from local officials and belatedly giving a fresh perspective on how George W. Bush assembled his winning coalition.

In 2000, Mr. Bush carried 228 congressional districts to Al Gore's 207 on his way to one of the closest victories in American history. This year Mr. Bush carried 255 congressional districts, nearly six in 10. The number of "turnover" districts--those voting for a House member of one party and a presidential candidate of the other--continues to shrink, mostly due to the growth of straight-ticket voting and gerrymandering. There were only 59 such districts in 2004, compared with 86 in 2000 and 110 when Bill Clinton beat Bob Dole in 1996.

The best chances for Democrats to gain the 15 seats they need to take control of the House in 2006 are in these districts held by "Kerry Republicans." The problem is that there are so few of them. John Kerry carried just 18 GOP House members' districts, while Mr. Bush carried 41 Democratic ones.

Only five Republican House members currently sit in districts where Mr. Bush won less than 47% of the presidential vote last year: two in Connecticut, two in Iowa and one in Delaware. But 31 House Democrats represent districts where John Kerry won less than 47%. That means Republicans have many more opportunities to pick up seats in favorable political terrain as Democratic members leave the House. No one expects Democrats to hold the seat of Ike Skelton of Missouri when he leaves office; President Bush won 64% of his district's votes. Ditto for the district of Gene Taylor of Mississippi, where Mr. Bush won 68%.





Another worrisome sign for Democrats is the Hispanic vote. Michael Barone, a co-author of the definitive Almanac of American Politics, reports that Polidata's findings tend to confirm the exit polls that showed George W. Bush gaining nine percentage points among Hispanic voters, ending up with some 44%. Several liberal-oriented groups disputed those numbers, but a look at the breakdown of the two dozen districts with Hispanic House members shows that Mr. Bush indeed made strong gains in their districts.
Take Texas, where six of the state's 32 House districts have Hispanic representatives (five Democrats and one Republican) and another 69%-Hispanic district is represented by Anglo Democrat Lloyd Doggett. In the areas that now make up those seven districts, Mr. Bush dramatically increased his vote totals over 2000, winning four of the seven districts and breaking even in their total popular vote. In two of the Democratic Hispanic districts, Mr. Bush won 55% of the vote, setting up the possibility that a Republican could win those seats when they become vacant.

In Florida, Mr. Bush's Hispanic percentages were artificially inflated in 2000 by Cuban-American anger over the Clinton administration's deportation of Elian Gonzalez. But Mr. Bush still did well in the three Miami-area districts represented by Cuban-American Republicans, winning them by an average of 12 percentage points.

But it is in California where Mr. Bush made the most surprising gains among Hispanic voters. Ten of the Golden State's 53 districts are held by Hispanic Democrats, and two others, in the Central Valley, by Portuguese-American Republicans. In the 10 Democratic districts, Al Gore won 65% of the vote in 2000. But in last year's election, Mr. Bush made gains in every district and ended up with about 40% of the overall vote in those 10 districts.

In 2000 Mr. Bush lost what is now the Orange County district held by Democrat Loretta Sanchez by 15% of the vote. In 2004, Mr. Bush outpolled Mr. Kerry in Ms. Sanchez's district. Similarly, Mr. Bush captured the Modesto-based district of Democrat Dennis Cardoza, an area that Al Gore had easily carried. "I fully appreciate the fact that George W. Bush won 49% of my district," says Jim Costa, a Fresno-area freshman Democrat who won only 54% last November against an Anglo Republican.

True, Hispanic voters were attracted to Mr. Bush for reasons that may not easily transfer to other Republicans. "He is seen as simpatico in terms of his strong religious faith, his willingness to speak some Spanish, school choice and a desire to help small business owners prosper," says Martha Montelongo, a talk show host in California. Obviously, calls for Republicans in government to crack down on illegal immigration can create cross-pressures that could endanger GOP support among Hispanics, but those are often exaggerated. Hispanics rank immigration low among their list of priority issues, and last November exit polls show that 47% of Hispanics in Arizona voted for Proposition 200, a measure designed to limit government services to illegal immigrants and prevent them from voting. "The Hispanics who voted for George Bush largely reject identity politics and simply want to be respected, rather than pandered to," says Ms. Montelongo.

The Polidata numbers show areas of Republican weakness, too. Mr. Bush continued to lose ground in university towns and among upper-income Protestants. Mr. Barone notes that the president won only 54% of the vote in Greenwich, Conn., the tony town that revered his grandfather and its senator, Prescott Bush. "Episcopalians have a declining use for George Bush," says Mr. Barone.

But Democrats should worry that those losses were more than compensated by his gains among Hispanics, rural Democrats and Italian-Americans. In the Brooklyn, N.Y., district represented in the House by Anthony Weiner, a former aide to Senator Chuck Schumer, Mr. Bush won 44% of the vote in a district that contains many white ethnic and Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods. In 2000, Mr. Bush had won only 30%.

It's no accident that Mrs. Clinton, who will be running for re-election in New York next year before she launches her presidential campaign, is talking about the importance of religious faith and reaching out to moderate voters. "She pores over political data as carefully as Bill Clinton ever did," says New York Democratic strategist Hank Sheinkopf. A close look at the Congressional district results from last year is convincing many Democrats that a move to the middle may be more than a smart media strategy. It may be a matter of political survival.

http://www.opinionjournal.com/diary/?id=110006510
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Apr, 2005 11:43 am
Wasn't sure where to post this ... but it fits here I guess ....

http://www.coxandforkum.com/archives/ClintonLegacy-X.gif
0 Replies
 
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Apr, 2005 12:12 pm
Sandy Berger sort of got lost in the commotion with Terri Schiavo and the Pope dying and all that. But isn't it fun how quiet the Democrats are being about him. Smile
0 Replies
 
 

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