193
   

monitoring Trump and relevant contemporary events

 
 
hightor
 
  7  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 12:16 pm
Quote:
BAGHDAD — The American-led military coalition in Iraq said Friday that it was investigating reports that scores of civilians — perhaps as many as 200, residents said — had been killed in recent American airstrikes in Mosul, the northern Iraqi city at the center of an offensive to drive out the Islamic State.

If confirmed, the series of airstrikes would rank among the highest civilian death tolls in an American air mission since the United States went to war in Iraq in 2003. And the reports of civilian deaths in Mosul came immediately after two recent incidents in Syria, where the coalition is also battling the Islamic State from the air, in which activists and local residents said dozens of civilians had been killed.

Taken together, the surge of reported civilian deaths raised questions about whether once-strict rules of engagement meant to minimize civilian casualties were being relaxed under the Trump administration, which has vowed to fight the Islamic State more aggressively.

American military officials insisted on Friday that the rules of engagement had not changed. They acknowledged, however, that American airstrikes in Syria and Iraq had been heavier in an effort to press the Islamic State on multiple fronts.

NYT

The military says that the rules of engagement haven't changed. And the struggle against the IS could very well have reached a point where more civilians are vulnerable — certainly fighting in the oldest sections of Mosul would be extremely challenging in that regard. However, it will be interesting to see if the administration shows any particular signs of concern about an uptake in civilian casualties. I could almost expect one of those "you gotta break eggs to make an omelet" excuses.
georgeob1
 
  -3  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 12:24 pm
@layman,
Only the idiotic California Legislature believe it can rule the laws of physics and "require" the production of motor vehicles with greater than 50 mpg fuel efficiency, and do so without major side effects. The state's electrical power grid is already highly stresses and the forthcoming shutdown of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant will eliminate about 9% of the existing power supply. State consumers already pay power (and water) rates that are more than double those nationally. The snowflakes in Sacramento ignore the growing economic divide that pervades this ever-more-expensive state. They evidently embrace the Marie Antoinette principle here, "If they have no bread, let them eat cake".
gungasnake
 
  -3  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 12:29 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
Educate yourself:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sane+progressive+russia
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  4  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 12:31 pm
Quote:
For Republicans Friday wasn't just bad. It was a disaster. Here are five reasons why.

A busted dealmaker


Donald Trump staked his reputation as a dealmaker - as a "closer" in the words of press secretary Sean Spicer - on getting the healthcare bill through the House of Representatives.

The president sang the bill's praises on Twitter, in press events and at campaign-style rallies.

On Friday Spicer told reporters the president had gone through "extraordinary feats" to try to get the bill approved.

"Has he pulled out every stop, has he called every member, has he tweaked every tweak, has he done every single thing he can possibly and used every minute of every day that's possible to get this thing through, then the answer is yes," Spicer said.

The reality, whether or not the president tried his absolute best-est, is that the bill went down in flames. Not only that, but all the threats and promises he made in the process were proven to be hollow.

He guaranteed a vote on Thursday that didn't happen. Then guaranteed a vote on Friday, and that didn't happen either. He warned his party of the dire consequences of a failure to act, and they ignored him.

Just over two months into his presidency, and Mr Trump's poll numbers are sagging, his agenda is on the ropes and his power is greatly diminished.

A powerless speaker


If it was a bad day for the president, it was a terrible day for Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, whose inability to control his congressional cohort was exposed for all to see.

As he stood before the cameras explaining the defeat, he looked and sounded like the coach of a team that had just lost a big game it had been favoured to win.

"We came really close," he said, "but we came up short."

The speaker of the House has considerable power to wield over individual members. He sets the rules of debate. He controls choice committee assignments, determines key legislative priorities and can direct party funds to his supporters.

All of that wasn't enough to prevent wholesale desertion on this bill from the left and right flanks of his party.

The conservative House Freedom Caucus may only be 29 members strong, but it proved it could go toe-to-toe with Mr Ryan and prevail, even squeezing a number of major concessions in the last few frenetic days.

Now that they have a taste of victory, they will be an even more potent thorn in Mr Ryan's side in future legislative battles.

An agenda derailed

The New York Times recently reported that the president has been grousing privately that he never should have agreed to take on healthcare reform as his first legislative priority.

Although he mentioned the topic repeatedly on the campaign trail, it always felt like a throw-away line offered to the Republican base - a bit of conservative gospel that party stalwarts expected to be repeated.

Policies like trade, infrastructure spending, tax reform and that "big, beautiful" wall on the US-Mexico border were always nearer and dearer to the Mr Trump's heart.

Those agenda items, however, are now at risk, as healthcare reform sinks beneath the waves. Tax cuts, for instance, are made considerably more complicated as long as the tax aspects of Obamacare remain on the books.

Wall Street investors are already expressing their growing pessimism over any serious tax-policy efforts, with stock prices sagging as the prospect of Republican healthcare reform's success dimmed, for instance.

There will still likely be members of Congress who want to keep plugging away on Obamacare repeal, seeing as how they campaigned on it for the past seven years. It will be difficult to agree on where to go next, and not everyone will be keen to listen to a president who botched his first big legislative test.
Healthcare in flux

"I don't know what else to say other than Obamacare is the law of the land," Mr Ryan said in his afternoon press conference conceding defeat. "We're going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future."

Mr Obama's healthcare reform may remain in place, but its future is still murky. Although Congress has failed in its attempt to dismantle the law, the Trump administration can still do a great deal to undermine it through executive action - in fact, it already has.
The mandate that all Americans purchase health insurance aren't being enforced. Efforts to encourage enrolment through the healthcare marketplaces are being curtailed. More states will be given leeway to alter and adjust how they implement their components of the law. All of this could significantly affect how Obamacare looks and operates across the US.

Mr Trump has repeatedly said that it was the wiser political move for Republicans to let the Obamacare systems collapse on their own and then blame the resulting chaos on the Democrats. While the political wisdom of this strategy is uncertain, the fact remains that Mr Trump and his administration could go a long way toward causing the works to "implode and then explode", in the president's words.

The law as it's currently constituted does have some self-correcting measures to prevent total collapse, however. If insurance rates increase, the size of the government price supports will grow accordingly. The basic regulations - such as "essential coverage" guarantees and price controls - will remain.

The bottom line is Obamacare lives to see another day - and, perhaps, another Democratic rise to power, when it can be more fully revived.
An angry base

For seven years Republicans have been promising that they will tear up the Obamacare "root and branch", in the words of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Success, they've said, is just an election away.

In 2010 Republicans won control of the House of Representatives. In 2014 they won control of the Senate. In 2016 they won the presidency. At last, Republican grass-roots activists were told, victory was in their grasp.

Only victory, at least for now, has slipped through conservative fingers once again.
At some point, the Republican base may start to wonder whether Obamacare is ever going to go away. And at some point if it doesn't, they may start to wonder why.

It's worth remembering that the reason the effort to pass the American Health Care Act failed was because the Republican Party itself was torn asunder on what to do about healthcare. Moderates feared that the proposed legislation would leave too many of their constituents without healthcare. Conservatives, on the other hand, thought the repeal efforts didn't go far enough.

Those problems aren't going to disappear anytime soon. While in the minority, it's been easy for Republican politicians to promise their voters "action" and "change". Now that they're in power, it has proven difficult to translate those words into policy.

When the next election rolls around, the Republican Party may face a Democratic Party that has been stirred into action and a Republican base disillusioned by their party's failure to perform. That, needless to say, is a recipe for electoral disaster.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-39384007
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  -3  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 12:31 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
.... evil Russians fucked the poor hildabeast out of the whitehouse with hacking and fake news.....

http://vignette1.wikia.nocookie.net/uncyclopedia/images/3/34/Bullshit.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20101009140746
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  -3  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 12:39 pm
@Fil Albuquerque,
The person who actually fucked any remaining rational democrats out of any sort of a meaningful shot at the white house was Hillary Clinton (along with the DNC ) and this included a massive cyber assault on the Sanders campaign and the people involved in it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLf3Wtcw60o&t=607s



Quote:
"...child pornography was being planted into our facebook groups..." 12:50 in video



0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  11  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 12:42 pm
Quote:
"We were very close," he told reporters Friday afternoon after the health care vote was pulled. The lack of bipartisan support made passing the legislation difficult, Trump conceded, saying that with no Democrat support, the health care overhaul couldn't pass."


How the hell can you say the bill failed because of a lack of Dem support when you hold a majority in both houses? You FAILED. You're a LOSER.

Trump Blames Dems After Bill Pulled, Says Obamacare ‘Will Explode’

Walter Hinteler
 
  5  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 01:30 pm
@jcboy,
http://i.imgur.com/1NCq3gV.jpg

Done.

Now Trump is steamrolling ahead with the next item on the agenda: overhauling the US tax code within the next couple of days ...
cicerone imposter
 
  6  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 01:34 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
He's going to end up with the same excuse: He didn't realize how complex the tax code is.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 01:37 pm
@Baldimo,
Baldimo wrote:
Were you under some illusion that it passed by straight votes in Congress and ended up on Obama's desk?
I don't know why you ask this.
My question was:
Walter Hinteler wrote:
So now there are different rules than in 2009/2010?


I asked that because you wrote that the rules were changed "in Congress to get it passed".
cicerone imposter
 
  5  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 01:43 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
The US tax code is over 74,000 pages long. I doubt Trump has read the first page.
georgeob1
 
  -4  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 01:49 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Have you ????
Baldimo
 
  -2  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 01:53 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Did you read the article from the link I posted? It will tell you what took place.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 02:06 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Usually when you point out what Baldimo actually said, he denies it and accuses you of hacking into A2K, or using your influence with the m0ods, to delete/edit his posts.
Baldimo
 
  -2  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 02:22 pm
@izzythepush,
Rolling Eyes
Your old age is ******* with your memory.
glitterbag
 
  4  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 02:59 pm
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:

Have you ????


I suppose you read the tax code for relaxation. Why do you have to be such a pu&z to people who actually think you are a nice person?
cicerone imposter
 
  4  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 03:01 pm
@georgeob1,
Yes, george. I read the 1040 form instructions to prepare it.
http://free.getformsonline.com/index.jhtml?partner=^BX2^xdm003&pkw=irs%201040%20instructions&adfi=&adti=aud-263255829966:kwd-301693282&adm=e&adn=s&add=c&adc=109004420523&adt=&ada=&adap=1t1&adp=&gclid=CMiL7-LG8tICFZRhfgodCT8Ilw
glitterbag
 
  3  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 03:05 pm
@Baldimo,
Baldimo wrote:

Rolling Eyes
Your old age is ******* with your memory.


brilliant repartee is not part of your tool kit, is it?
cicerone imposter
 
  4  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 03:10 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I should also add that when we owned income property and a share on a condo at Incline Village at Lake Tahoe, our tax returns were more than a dozen pages long. I was also responsible for preparing the share document for everybody's tax return for the condo. I also did consulting work.
Our 1997 tax return was 27 pages long.
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  4  
Sat 25 Mar, 2017 03:42 pm
@georgeob1,
Quote:
Read the mission statement and history of the Commonwealth Fund.
I did. Here's the mission statement in full:
Quote:
The Commonwealth Fund—among the first private foundations started by a woman philanthropist, Anna M. Harkness—was established in 1918 with the broad charge to enhance the common good.

The mission of The Commonwealth Fund is to promote a high-performing health care system that achieves better access, improved quality, and greater efficiency, particularly for society's most vulnerable, including low-income people, the uninsured, minority Americans, young children, and elderly adults.

The Fund carries out this mandate by supporting independent research on health care issues and making grants to improve health care practice and policy. An international program in health policy is designed to stimulate innovative policies and practices in the United States and other industrialized countries.


Quote:
I don't need to do anything.
True. You don't have to cite research supporting your opinions. You don't even have to be logical. No rules here about either.

Quote:
I happen to know a great deal about mathematics and statistical analysis.
I'm sure you do. However, this will carry little weight if others with a similar grasp of those skills/knowledge would not find your analyses convincing and as you know, many do not.

Truly, I don't know how you might expect anyone to accept what you hold to be true. You offer up nothing other than your certainties.

 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 05/08/2021 at 07:03:38