178
   

monitoring Trump and relevant contemporary events

 
 
snood
 
  6  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 06:21 am
@coldjoint,
coldjoint wrote:

Twitter warning!


Quote:
Get tough Democrat Mayors and Governors. These people are ANARCHISTS. Call in our National Guard NOW. The World is watching and laughing at you and Sleepy Joe. Is this what America wants? NO!!!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 31, 2020



The abysmal punkass coward posted this tough talk while cowering in a bunker hiding from protesters. A real president would address the millions of people taking to the streets to air their grievances, and not just take petty potshots at the hundreds trying to make the protests about chaos and violence. This is a moment for a real president to provide moral leadership - like the Minneapolis Police Chief who calls the other three cops complicit; instead of remaining silent about the injustice that befell George Floyd.

Donald Trump is a worthless piece of ****. The country will be well rid of him once we scrape him off of our shoes.
Walter Hinteler
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 06:32 am
The Kremlin said today it needed more details before responding to Trump’s proposal to invite Russia to attend a Group of Seven nations summit, but that Putin supported dialogue on the issue. (Reuters)
The UK will oppose any proposal to readmit Russia to the G7, Downing Street has said, after Trump floated an expansion of the group of major international powers. The PM's spokesman pointed out that any expansion had to be agreed unanimously. Canada's Justin Trudeau has also signalled his opposition.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  6  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 06:37 am
You know, two other Republicans, Richard Nixon and Nelson Rockefeller, both faced down protesters. Nixon had to flee when they started throwing rotten vegetables and even a few rocks at him--but he didn't hide in a bunker. Nelson Rockefeller not only faced down the protesters, he gave them the finger. Not very decorous, but certainly not cowardly like Plump.

https://i.pinimg.com/236x/b0/fa/92/b0fa92da3fb93a037611f68fedca38ef--nelson-rockefeller-september-.jpg
Walter Hinteler
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 07:19 am
@Setanta,
In a far distant country over the ocean and there in a city on the banks of one of the major rivers of that continent, people like Trump are called Bangbüx .
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 07:21 am
'Mr President, don't go hide': China goads US over George Floyd protests

Officials and state media appear to revel in scenes of US unrest, comparing protests there to Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement

Helen Davidson
@heldavidson Email
Sun 31 May 2020 23.40 EDT Last modified on Sun 31 May 2020 23.41 EDT

Chinese officials and state media have seized on news of the protests sweeping the US, comparing the widespread unrest to the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong and accusing Washington of hypocrisy.

Mass protests spread across multiple US states over the weekend, many escalating after police responded with teargas, pepper balls and other projectiles, and in some instances using vehicles to ram protesters. Some cities have seen arson and looting, and across the nation police have been criticised for using excessive force.

The protests were sparked by the death of George Floyd, an African American man killed by a white police officer in Minneapolis.

. . .

“Mr President, don’t go hide behind the secret service,” said Hu. “Go to talk to the demonstrators seriously. Negotiate with them, just like you urged Beijing to talk to Hong Kong rioters.”


More:
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/jun/01/mr-president-dont-go-hide-china-goads-us-over-george-floyd-protests
revelette1
 
  3  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 07:59 am
@Olivier5,
Thanks Oliver, we need encouraging sights such as this one in your post.

On this page
0 Replies
 
revelette1
 
  4  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 08:02 am
Trump, Lacking Clear Authority, Says U.S. Will Declare Antifa a Terrorist Group

Quote:
More important, even if antifa were a real organization, the laws that permit the federal government to deem entities terrorists and impose sanctions on them are limited to foreign groups. There is no domestic terrorism law, despite periodic proposals to create one.

“There is no authority under law to do that — and if such a statute were passed, it would face serious First Amendment challenges,” said Mary B. McCord, a former head of the Justice Department’s National Security Division. “But right now, the only terrorist authority is for foreign terrorist organizations.”

In dealing with effectively domestic terrorism investigations into neo-Nazi organizations like the Base and Atomwaffen Division, for example, the F.B.I. has treated them as criminal enterprises.
0 Replies
 
revelette1
 
  4  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 08:21 am


I absolutely loved her speech, I was cleaning the living room at the time, I sat down and turned the TV all way up. made sure the caption was on, and watched it all. Strong words. I agreed with her words of peace but action. Wish more would listen.
0 Replies
 
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neptuneblue
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 09:35 am
@livinglava,
https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/101320112_10220685882511421_8952682448873848832_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_sid=1480c5&_nc_ohc=bQIa3CodU6IAX_OsO0I&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-1.xx&oh=d4b260b831ea840f7bc9b1b67797a2cd&oe=5EF8EE0C
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bobsal u1553115
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 11:07 am
https://i.imgur.com/IL82zhy.png
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izzythepush
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 11:49 am
@bobsal u1553115,
This is strangely prophetic.

revelette1
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 12:13 pm
Quote:
How to Make this Moment the Turning Point for Real Change

As millions of people across the country take to the streets and raise their voices in response to the killing of George Floyd and the ongoing problem of unequal justice, many people have reached out asking how we can sustain momentum to bring about real change.

Ultimately, it’s going to be up to a new generation of activists to shape strategies that best fit the times. But I believe there are some basic lessons to draw from past efforts that are worth remembering.

First, the waves of protests across the country represent a genuine and legitimate frustration over a decades-long failure to reform police practices and the broader criminal justice system in the United States. The overwhelming majority of participants have been peaceful, courageous, responsible, and inspiring. They deserve our respect and support, not condemnation — something that police in cities like Camden and Flint have commendably understood.

On the other hand, the small minority of folks who’ve resorted to violence in various forms, whether out of genuine anger or mere opportunism, are putting innocent people at risk, compounding the destruction of neighborhoods that are often already short on services and investment and detracting from the larger cause. I saw an elderly black woman being interviewed today in tears because the only grocery store in her neighborhood had been trashed. If history is any guide, that store may take years to come back. So let’s not excuse violence, or rationalize it, or participate in it. If we want our criminal justice system, and American society at large, to operate on a higher ethical code, then we have to model that code ourselves.

Second, I’ve heard some suggest that the recurrent problem of racial bias in our criminal justice system proves that only protests and direct action can bring about change, and that voting and participation in electoral politics is a waste of time. I couldn’t disagree more. The point of protest is to raise public awareness, to put a spotlight on injustice, and to make the powers that be uncomfortable; in fact, throughout American history, it’s often only been in response to protests and civil disobedience that the political system has even paid attention to marginalized communities. But eventually, aspirations have to be translated into specific laws and institutional practices — and in a democracy, that only happens when we elect government officials who are responsive to our demands.

Moreover, it’s important for us to understand which levels of government have the biggest impact on our criminal justice system and police practices. When we think about politics, a lot of us focus only on the presidency and the federal government. And yes, we should be fighting to make sure that we have a president, a Congress, a U.S. Justice Department, and a federal judiciary that actually recognize the ongoing, corrosive role that racism plays in our society and want to do something about it. But the elected officials who matter most in reforming police departments and the criminal justice system work at the state and local levels.

It’s mayors and county executives that appoint most police chiefs and negotiate collective bargaining agreements with police unions. It’s district attorneys and state’s attorneys that decide whether or not to investigate and ultimately charge those involved in police misconduct. Those are all elected positions. In some places, police review boards with the power to monitor police conduct are elected as well. Unfortunately, voter turnout in these local races is usually pitifully low, especially among young people — which makes no sense given the direct impact these offices have on social justice issues, not to mention the fact that who wins and who loses those seats is often determined by just a few thousand, or even a few hundred, votes.

So the bottom line is this: if we want to bring about real change, then the choice isn’t between protest and politics. We have to do both. We have to mobilize to raise awareness, and we have to organize and cast our ballots to make sure that we elect candidates who will act on reform.

Finally, the more specific we can make demands for criminal justice and police reform, the harder it will be for elected officials to just offer lip service to the cause and then fall back into business as usual once protests have gone away. The content of that reform agenda will be different for various communities. A big city may need one set of reforms; a rural community may need another. Some agencies will require wholesale rehabilitation; others should make minor improvements. Every law enforcement agency should have clear policies, including an independent body that conducts investigations of alleged misconduct. Tailoring reforms for each community will require local activists and organizations to do their research and educate fellow citizens in their community on what strategies work best.

But as a starting point, here’s a report and toolkit developed by the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and based on the work of the Task Force on 21st Century Policing that I formed when I was in the White House. And if you’re interested in taking concrete action, we’ve also created a dedicated site at the Obama Foundation to aggregate and direct you to useful resources and organizations who’ve been fighting the good fight at the local and national levels for years.

I recognize that these past few months have been hard and dispiriting — that the fear, sorrow, uncertainty, and hardship of a pandemic have been compounded by tragic reminders that prejudice and inequality still shape so much of American life. But watching the heightened activism of young people in recent weeks, of every race and every station, makes me hopeful.

If, going forward, we can channel our justifiable anger into peaceful, sustained, and effective action, then this moment can be a real turning point in our nation’s long journey to live up to our highest ideals.

Let’s get to work.


https://medium.com/@BarackObama/how-to-make-this-moment-the-turning-point-for-real-change-9fa209806067
bobsal u1553115
 
  4  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 12:16 pm
@izzythepush,
I'm reading Exterminator now, Big Bill's got plenty of important things to say.
0 Replies
 
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blatham
 
  3  
Reply Mon 1 Jun, 2020 01:09 pm
If one were to identify the "most useless WP opinion writer" I don't know who would better deserve the appellation than Kathleen Parker. As Jay Rosen just noted on twitter, the headline of her op ed column on Nov 4, 2016 read...
Quote:
Calm Down. We'll Be Fine No Matter Who Wins

and today her headline reads...
Quote:
"We Are Tipping Into Chaos"
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