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monitoring Trump and relevant contemporary events

 
 
nimh
 
  3  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 03:33 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

The Battle of Cable Street was a turning point in British Fascism. They were given a bloody nose they never recovered from.

This might be at least partially myth rather than fact, if this informative piece in History Today is correct:

The Myth of Cable Street

Now there's occasionally something to be said for myths... they're bad history, obviously, but sometimes they might be good politics. Like, even if the author is correct that the Battle of Cable Street itself actually came at a time when the British fascists were already beaten down, and rather than giving them "a bloody nose" actually revived them for a bit, the myth of Cable Street helped establish a powerful narrative on English working class anti-fascism that might well have helped marginalize the British fascists in the longer run.

That's just me speculating, anyway. I'd had the same perception of the Battle of Cable Street as a positive "turning point" as you, so reading his counterargument was interesting. Moreover, the same author wrote a longer article later on that delves into the whole sordid saga of the British fascists and how they failed in a bit more detail, that's more nuanced and ambiguous:

When (and When Not) to Fight With Fascists

The interesting part about that piece is that he still argues that the Battle of Cable Street specifically, judging on contemporary sources, was counterproductive; but that this doesn't mean that the principle of stopping fascists on the streets with "aggressive, confrontational" tactics is necessarily wrong. In fact, he argues that those tactics did work in an earlier phase, back in 1934, when the British fascists were actually at their strongest, and those resistance tactics helped unmask them.

Anyway, still not entirely sure how to take all this, but interesting stuff.
emmett grogan
 
  2  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 03:33 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
He ignored investigating sex crimes against undocumented children - at least 400 cases.

Arpaio Is Criticized Over Handling of Sex-Crimes Cases

By MARC LACEYDEC. 9, 2011

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/10/us/sheriff-joe-arpaio-criticized-over-handling-of-sex-crimes-cases.html

GUADALUPE, Ariz. — Although Joe Arpaio calls himself “America’s Toughest Sheriff,” a growing chorus of local critics want another title for him: Retired.

Sheriff Arpaio, the top law enforcement official in sprawling Maricopa County, is perhaps best known for his hard-nosed treatment of prisoners and his aggressive raids aimed at illegal immigrants. But it is his department’s approach to more than 400 sex-crimes cases that has Sheriff Arpaio in trouble.

His deputies failed to investigate or conducted only the sketchiest of inquiries into hundreds of sex crimes between 2005 and 2007, investigations by Arizona law enforcement agencies have shown. Many of those cases involved molested children.

The cases were first raised by The East Valley Tribune in 2008 but resurfaced in the news media earlier this year and in a recent article by The Associated Press, which prompted Sheriff Arpaio to defend himself at a news conference. “If there were any victims, I apologize to those victims,” he said on Monday, vowing to hold deputies accountable.

But his grudging mea culpa only incited more outrage.

“A sincere apology and acceptance of responsibility from Joe Arpaio to these victims would have been the professional and compassionate thing to do,” Bill Louis, a former assistant chief of the El Mirage police, wrote Thursday in The Arizona Republic. “But instead we once again witnessed Arpaio’s smug and defiant attitude — this time directed towards the very victims he neglected.”

Many of the cases originated in El Mirage, a working-class suburb of Phoenix, where the Police Department was disbanded in 2005 and the Sheriff’s Department was called in to provide policing. But when the Police Department was reformed in 2007, officials discovered that dozens of sensitive cases, many filed by illegal immigrants, had not been adequately investigated or investigated at all.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  4  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 03:37 pm
@nimh,
Sometimes a good story is all you need, suffice it to say UKIP is about as far right as we get nowadays so something must have worked.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  4  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 03:39 pm
@nimh,
The Battle of Cable Street features in this book, I enjoyed it.

https://vulpeslibris.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/boxer-beetle-cover.jpg?w=547
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  -2  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:00 pm
@emmett grogan,
What's with the insults?
snood
 
  7  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:00 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Cycloptichorn wrote:

Quote:
Arpaio is a folk hero for many people on the Right and not because he has a long history of brutal violations of constitutional rights


If you're honest with yourself, you'd admit that this is exactly why he's a folk-hero to many on the Right.

He regularly violated the rights of Americans by racially profiling them; the Right applauds this, because they love racial profiling and think it's appropriate.

He abused his prisoners for years with his 'tent cities,' and the Right applauds this, because they believe prisoners deserve abuse.

He was found guilty of Contempt of Court for ignoring a judge's order, and the Right applauds this, for they too hold the Law in contempt.

I could go on. The worse he acts, the more y'all love him.

Cycloptichorn

Edit: come to think of it, the same is true for Trump. The worse he acts, the more some of y'all love him. Why do you think that is?

The way people died in Arpaio's jail was I think the creepiest thing about him...
Quote:
From 1996 to 2015, the suicide rate among jail deaths in Sheriff Joe Arpaio's lockups was an astounding 24 percent, with 39 of the 157 hanging themselves.

Furthermore, of the 157 deaths listed on the sheriff's watch on the M.E.'s chart, 34 simply are tagged as having been found dead with no explanation as to cause of death. More mysteriously, another 39 died in the county hospital without explanation. That's 73 deaths — nearly half of all deaths — that county authorities list as "who knows?"

http://www.alternet.org/civil-liberties/how-many-inmates-have-died-sheriff-joe-arpaios-jails-who-knows-its-big-number
emmett grogan
 
  2  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:04 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Quote:
And an even further repeating.

I remember him from Abuzz and he wasn't such a vetch back then. What the hell happened to him??


You feel insulted by "vetch"? Sensitive soul aren't you. Wait don't tell me, another "insult".
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  3  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:06 pm
@Setanta,
Or even watch my goldfish, if I had goldfish.
Cycloptichorn
 
  7  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:07 pm
@snood,
Quote:
That's 73 deaths — nearly half of all deaths — that county authorities list as "who knows?"


More like, 'who cares?' And, once again, Ariapo's supporters literally do not. They don't care if these people froze to death in tent cities or died of overheating or thirst. 95% of them were the dreaded Brown People of one shade or another, so his supporters don't give two shits about it.

The man is a monster and I don't say that lightly. I think that anyone who supports him would be hard-pressed to engage in an actual discussion about his positive and negative points.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
emmett grogan
 
  2  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:11 pm
Trump's Media Pals Are Busy Creating a Left-Wing 'Threat' to Balance Out the Awful Racist Right-Wing Hordes That Threaten Civil Society

We have to be vigilant about the coming smear project against Antifa.
By Thom Hartmann / AlterNet
August 29, 2017, 2:26 PM GMT

http://www.alternet.org/activism/trumps-media-pals-are-busy-creating-left-wing-threat-balance-out-awful-racist-right-wing

In these dark days, an intergenerational warning is in order: Antifa folks, be wary. They are coming for you.

Some of us have seen this movie before. In my generation, when I was a teenage member of MSU’s SDS in the late 1960s, I remember the guy who was always yelling, “Kill the pigs,” and encouraging us to burn down the ROTC building on campus. In later years, I heard from old SDS colleagues that when they sued the police, they learned that the outspoken guy was a police officer and his friends were informants.

For my dad’s generation, the right-wing takeover of a protest movement happened in Germany generations ago, so most Americans don’t even recognize Marinus van der Lubbe’s name. But the Germans remember well that fateful day 84 years ago: Feb. 27, 1933. And many of them are looking at the confrontations in our streets and worrying.

It started when the government, struggling with questions of its own legitimacy and the instability of its leader, received reports of an imminent terrorist attack. Historians are still debating whether the “terrorist” was a mentally incompetent young man maneuvered into place to take the fall for the crime, or was an actual communist ideologue (of limited intellectual means and probably schizophrenic; that seems to be one thing most agree on).

But the warnings of investigators were ignored at the highest levels, in part because the government was distracted; the man who claimed to be the nation's leader had not been elected by a majority vote and the people claimed he had no right to the powers he coveted.

He was a simpleton, some said, a cartoon character of a man who saw things in black-and-white terms and didn't have the intellect to understand the subtleties of running a nation in a complex and internationalist world. His coarse use of language, reflecting his background of hanging out with disreputable sorts, and his simplistic and often-inflammatory nationalistic rhetoric offended the aristocrats, foreign leaders, and the well-educated elite in the government and media.

He desperately wanted to be appreciated and loved by the “old money” crowd, but he also hated them because they had never accepted him and, deep down inside, he knew they never would.

Nonetheless, he knew the terrorist was going to strike, and he had already considered his response. When an aide brought him word that the nation's most prestigious building was ablaze, he rushed to the scene and called a press conference.

"You are now witnessing the beginning of a great epoch in history," Hitler proclaimed, standing in front of the burned-out German Parliament building, surrounded by national media.

"This fire," he said, his voice trembling with emotion, "is the beginning." He used the occasion—"a sign from God," he called it—to declare an “all-out war on terrorism” and its ideological sponsors, a people, he said, who traced their origins to the Middle East and found motivation for their evil deeds in their religion.

And, he said, their fellow travelers —"communists” like the man who’d set the Reichstag on fire—needed to be tracked down and utterly destroyed.

Two weeks later, the first detention center for terrorists was built in Oranianburg to hold the first suspected allies of the infamous terrorist. In a national outburst of patriotism, the leader's flag was everywhere, even printed large in newspapers suitable for window display.

Within four weeks of the terrorist attack, the nation's now-popular leader had pushed through legislation, in the name of combating terrorism and fighting the philosophy he said spawned it, that suspended constitutional guarantees of free speech, privacy, and habeas corpus.

Police could now intercept mail and wiretap phones; suspected terrorists could be imprisoned without specific charges and without access to their lawyers; police could sneak into people's homes without warrants and peek around without homeowners know it, if the cases involved terrorism.

To get his patriotic "Decree on the Protection of People and State" passed over the objections of concerned legislators and civil libertarians, he agreed to put a four-year sunset provision on it: if the national emergency provoked by the terrorist attack was over by then, the freedoms and rights would be returned to the people, and the police agencies would be re-restrained. Just like with America’s recent Patriot Act, the first version of which had sunset provisions, legislators would later say they hadn't had time to read the bill before voting on it.

Immediately after passage of the anti-terrorism act, his federal police agencies stepped up their program of arresting suspicious persons and holding them without access to lawyers or courts. In the first year only a few hundred were interred, and those who objected were largely ignored by the mainstream press, which was afraid to offend and thus lose access to a leader who was so newsworthy.

Citizens who protested the leader in public— and there were many—quickly found themselves confronting the newly empowered police's batons, gas, and jail cells, or fenced off in protest zones safely out of earshot of the leader's public speeches. (In the meantime, he was constantly talking up the threat of these “other people” among the German people, while armed gangs terrorized minorities and smashed windows in Jewish-owned businesses.)

Within the first months after that terrorist attack, at the suggestion of a political adviser, he brought a formerly obscure word into common usage. He wanted to stir a "racial pride" among his white countrymen, so instead of referring to the nation by its name, he began to refer to it as the "Homeland," a phrase publicly promoted in the introduction to a 1934 speech recorded in Leni Riefenstahl's famous propaganda movie "Triumph Of The Will."

As hoped, people's hearts swelled with pride, and the beginning of an us-versus-them mentality was sewn. Our land was the homeland, citizens thought: all others were simply foreign lands. We are the "true people," he suggested, the only ones worthy of our nation's concern; if bombs fall on others, or human rights are violated in other nations and it makes our lives better, it's of little concern to us.

Playing on this new nationalism, and exploiting a disagreement with the French over his increasing militarism, he argued that any international body that didn't put Germany first was neither relevant nor useful. He thus withdrew his country from the League of Nations in October, 1933, and then negotiated a separate naval armaments agreement with Anthony Eden of the United Kingdom.

His propaganda minister orchestrated a campaign to ensure the people that he was supported by the power brokers of the most fervent of Germany’s Christian sects. He even proclaimed the need for a revival of the Christian faith across his nation, what he called a "New Christianity." Every man in his rapidly growing army wore a belt buckle that declared "Gott Mit Uns" (God Is With Us) and most of them fervently believed it was true.

Within a year of the terrorist attack, the nation's leader determined that the various local police and federal agencies around the nation were lacking the clear communication and overall coordinated administration necessary to deal with the terrorist threat facing the nation, particularly the troublesome "intellectuals" and "liberals."

He proposed a single new national agency to protect the security of the Homeland, consolidating the actions of dozens of previously independent police, border, and investigative agencies under a single leader. He appointed one of his most trusted associates to be leader of this new agency, the Central Security Office for the Homeland, and gave it a role in the government equal to the other major departments.

His assistant who dealt with the press noted that, since the terrorist attack, "Radio and press are at our disposal." Those voices questioning the legitimacy of their nation's leader, or raising questions about his checkered past, had by now faded from the public's recollection, as his central security office began advertising a “See Something, Say Something” program encouraging people to phone in tips about suspicious neighbors.

Those denounced often included opposition politicians and celebrities who dared speak out—a favorite target of his regime. He began a campaign to discredit the press; he called them the Lugenpresse, or "lying press" (“fake news” in today’s vernacular). The phrase was repeated endlessly until all the free press was shut down in 1934. By 1935, all the radio stations and newspapers were owned by wealthy, hard-right friends of his regime.

To consolidate his power, he concluded that government alone wasn't enough. He reached out to industry and forged an alliance, bringing former executives of the nation's largest corporations into high government positions. A flood of government money poured into corporate coffers to fight the war against the “leftist terrorists” lurking within the Homeland, and to prepare for wars overseas.

He encouraged large corporations friendly to him to acquire media outlets and other industrial concerns across the nation, particularly those previously owned by liberals or Jews. He built powerful alliances with industry; one corporate ally got the lucrative contract worth millions to build the first large-scale detention center for enemies of the state. Soon more would follow. Industry flourished.

But after an interval of peace following the terrorist attack, voices of dissent again arose within and without the government. Students had started an active program opposing him (known as the White Rose Society), and leaders of nearby nations were speaking out against his bellicose rhetoric. He needed a diversion, something to direct people away from the corporate cronyism being exposed in his own government, and away from questions of his illegitimate rise to power.

To deal with those who dissented from his policies, at the advice of his politically savvy advisors, he and his handmaidens in the press began a campaign to equate him and his policies with patriotism and the nation itself. National unity was essential, they said, to ensure that the terrorists or their sponsors didn't think they'd succeeded in splitting the nation or weakening its will.

In times of war, they said, there could be only "one people, one nation, and one commander-in-chief" ("Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Fuhrer"), and so his advocates in the media began a nationwide campaign charging that critics of his policies were attacking the nation itself.

Hitler and his friends in the right-wing press repeatedly told the people that the majority, the “silent majority” of good Germans, hated the leftists.

Those questioning him were labeled “communists,” "anti-German" or "not good Germans," and it was suggested they were aiding the enemies of the state by failing in the patriotic necessity of supporting the nation's valiant men in uniform. It was one of his most effective ways to stifle dissent and pit wage-earning people (from whom most of the police and army came) against the "intellectuals and liberals" who were critical of his policies.

He spoke openly of his “love” for police and the military, and they in turn embraced him with fervor, redoubling the violence they wrought against peaceful protestors.

Hitler’s rise to power was largely on the backs of the labor and communist movements. They were his “enemies” first and foremost (although anti-Semitism had been part of his shtick from the beginning: his main attack was that the labor and communist movements were filled with Jews). And he largely destroyed them when he successfully sold the German people on the idea that the "left” was responsible for burning down the Parliament building, the 9/11 event of that day.

There’s little doubt in my mind, having lived through the era of COINTELPRO and the Patriot Act, that somewhere out there is a person who’s planning to commit an act of terrorism. It may be a dedicated but deluded left-winger, or more likely, a right-winger hoping to stir things up by pretending to be a left-winger. And Trump and his friendly “news” outlets are ready to use it.

Perhaps apocryphally, Mark Twain once noted that, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it rhymes.”

There’s no shortage of examples of that rhyme, and given all the “mainstream” press now being thrown at the Antifa movement, it’s a sure thing that they’re going to be the administration’s and the media’s next big boogeyman.

Somewhere out there is the next Marinus van der Lubbe, and Trump and his press are ready.

Thom Hartmann is a talk-show host and author of over 25 books in print.
emmett grogan
 
  2  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:15 pm

Trump Reportedly Feels Betrayed by Cabinet, and His Mood Is the 'Worst It's Ever Been'

A confidant says the president feels "this is not what he signed up for."

By Travis Gettys / Raw Story
August 30, 2017, 8:57 AM GMT

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has been publicly challenging the White House, but advisers say President Donald Trump can’t afford to fire him.

A source close to the president said Trump was angered that Tillerson and economic adviser Gary Cohn criticized his response to a Charlottesville white supremacist rally, but there’s not much he can do about it, reported Politico.

“I think that cuts him to the quick,” the source told the website.

Trump’s advisers don’t believe they could find a qualified candidate to replace Tillerson, who has feuded with the White House for months, because they don’t think UN Ambassador Nikki Haley is ready to take over.

“I couldn’t name you a guy who would take the job or get confirmed,” the source said.

The White House has experienced an exodus of staffers in recent weeks, although few of those positions have been filled — and, outside of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, no one seems especially eager to join the administration.

New chief of staff John Kelly has no plans to replace chief strategist Steve Bannon or deputy assistant Sebastian Gorka.

“General Kelly has come in and done a look-see on what everyone’s been working on for the first six or seven months here,” one White House aide told Politico. “Some people were ready, and some people were not.”

Trump returned from a 17-day vacation to find his influence shrunken, as the Russia investigation continues to consume his administration and congressional Republicans openly questioning his leadership.

That has left the president’s mindset as “the worst it’s ever been,” according to the Politico source.

“He feels like this is not what he signed up for, and his accomplishments are being underplayed,” the source said. “He just looks around and says, ‘When is this going to get better?’”
maporsche
 
  5  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:19 pm
This is an insensitive time to ask this question, but with all the stuff on the news about Houston a question that keeps popping into my mind is on the federal flood insurance program that is going to bail these people out...again.

What do people think about this program that encourages development into flood plain zones in cities down south? Many places that also have pretty lax zoning laws that allow for millions and million in devastation in order to save a developer a few bucks.

Also, for the right-leaning among us who believe in smaller government (like Ted Cruz)...curious how you feel about the government bail out that happens in places like this, over and over.

Hurricane zone, earthquake zones, flooding zones, etc...all of them I'm curious about opinions on.


It's a tiny part of the budget so I'm not suggesting that anyone gets done (besides maybe changing some zoning laws and requiring some steps to be taken to help avoid this in the future) but I read about a house that has been flooded 32 times in the last 34 years and continues to get help from taxpayers.
reasoning logic
 
  1  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:23 pm
@emmett grogan,
emmett grogan Are you a socialist?
Cycloptichorn
 
  6  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:30 pm
@maporsche,
Not insensitive at all, and I say that as someone who has parents who were flooded out.

Truth is that you can get a variance in Houston or anywhere in Texas really simply by snapping your fingers. These people don't know the first ******* thing about urban planning, or care, because 'muh unnecessary regulations.' This is the result.

Truth is that there are about 70k houses in Houston that shouldn't be rebuilt. They are in flood zones that look like nice forests, until the water rises a few feet. They WILL flood again.

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  6  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:32 pm
@emmett grogan,
emmett grogan wrote:


Trump Reportedly Feels Betrayed by Cabinet, and His Mood Is the 'Worst It's Ever Been'

That has left the president’s mindset as “the worst it’s ever been,” according to the Politico source.

“He feels like this is not what he signed up for, and his accomplishments are being underplayed,” the source said. “He just looks around and says, ‘When is this going to get better?’”


Never, you ******* dimwit. It'll never get even slightly better.

Cycloptichorn
emmett grogan
 
  2  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:47 pm
@maporsche,
It gets better: Cruz, Cronyn and most of the GOP Reps were against Sandy relief. The East coasters are riding them unmercifully.
0 Replies
 
reasoning logic
 
  1  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:48 pm
If you are a Trump supporter are you able to accept the truth about Trumps quotes on his campaign trail? Please do not pussy out of this question, "be a man or a woman and stand up and argue this to prove your point that your man stands behind his quotes.

0 Replies
 
emmett grogan
 
  4  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:49 pm
@reasoning logic,
No. I am progressive Republican. I believe in capitalism - regulated capitalism. I'm a tax and save Republican.
emmett grogan
 
  2  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 04:52 pm
@Cycloptichorn,
Quote:
Never, you ******* dimwit. It'll never get even slightly better.


If I have anything to say about it.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  5  
Wed 30 Aug, 2017 05:04 pm
@emmett grogan,
emmett grogan wrote:

No. I am progressive Republican. I believe in capitalism - regulated capitalism. I'm a tax and save Republican.


My favorite kind!

Why, oh why, is it considered 'Conservative' to run constant deficits? To cut taxes during a time of heavy deficit and debt? To constantly engage in warfare, at great expense? To destroy our environment in the name of short-term profits? I've never been able to understand how the modern Republican is even remotely 'conservative.'

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
 

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