0
   

Is Matthew 12:40 Using Common Idiomatic Language?

 
 
rstrats
 
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2016 07:50 am
Whenever the three days and three nights of Matthew 12:40 is brought up in a discussion with 6th day of the week crucifixion advocates, they frequently assert that it is using common Jewish idiomatic language. I wonder if anyone knows of any writing that shows examples from the first century or before regarding a period of time that is said to consist of a specific number of days and/or a specific number of nights where the period of time couldn't have included at least a part of each one of the specific number of days and at least a part of each one of the specific number of nights?

And remember that the purpose of this topic is not to discuss how long the Messiah was in the heart of the earth. There are other topics that do that. However, there are those who say that Matthew 12:40 is using common Jewish idiomatic language such as the Messiah saying that He would be in the heart of the earth for 3 nights when He knew that it would only be for 2 nights. But in order to say that it was common, one would have to know of other instances where the same pattern had to have been used. I am simply looking for some of those instances, scriptural or otherwise.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 974 • Replies: 11
No top replies

 
rstrats
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 May, 2016 02:18 pm
Since it's been awhile, perhaps someone new looking in will know of examples.
0 Replies
 
AugustineBrother
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2016 07:05 am
@rstrats,
Yes, the subject is discussed in
JESUS CHRIST: His Life, His Teaching, and His Work (Science and Culture Series)1950
by Ferdinand Prat
rstrats
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Sep, 2016 08:39 am
@AugustineBrother,
AugustineBrother,

Are you a 6th day of the week crucifixion advocate?
0 Replies
 
CVeigh
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Sep, 2016 12:54 pm
@rstrats,
Ferdinand Prat's book will help with this
Jesus Christ: His life, his teaching and his work; Volumes 1 & 2 complete in one volume1963
by Ferdinand Prat
rstrats
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Sep, 2016 06:42 am
@CVeigh,
CVeigh,
re: "Ferdinand Prat's book will help with this"

Is Prat a 6th day of the week crucifixion advocate who believes that the Messiah is using common idiomatic/figure of speech/colloquial language - language where a night time is said to be involved with an event when no part of the night time could have occurred?
0 Replies
 
peacecrusader888
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Oct, 2016 07:24 am
@rstrats,
It is not an idiomatic expression. Clearly, Jesus said three days AND three nights. In the Old Testament, it is also three days AND three night in the great fish's belly (Jonah 1:17).
0 Replies
 
peacecrusader888
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Oct, 2016 07:48 am
@rstrats,
Jesus was three days AND three nights in the heart of the earth. Instead of Friday crucifixion, it would be Thursday crucifixon. The next day, Friday, was the high day sabbath (John 19:31). And then the next day, Saturday, will be the regular weekly Sabbath of the Jews. Both Friday and Saturday were sabbath days and the market was closed. On Sunday, after the Sabbath, was a regular trading day. This was when Mary Magdalene et al. bought the sweet spices. But it was the Sabbath of the followers of Jesus, so they could not do their marketing. But since it was summer when Jesus was crucified. AND hot in the afternoon, the trading day was from sunrise to noon, and 3-4pm till 30 minutes to one hour after the sunset had set. This was the only window of opportunity that they could buy the sweet spices - sunset till 30 minutes to one hour when the shops were opened. These happened on:
3760 Av 30, 1 BC 08-17, Thursday, crucifixion of Jesus
3760 Elul 1, 1 BC 08-18, Friday, high day Sabbath, New Moon Festival

0 Replies
 
peacecrusader888
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Oct, 2016 08:16 am
@rstrats,
3760 Elul 2, 1 BC 08-19, Saturday, regular weekly Sabbath of the Jews
3760 Elul 3, 1 BC 08-20, Sunday, Sabbath of the followers of Jesus
3760 Elul 4, 1 BC 08-21, Monday, resurrection, first day of the week

The spirit of Ama revealed to us that Jesus was crucified on 08-17. The first day of the week is Monday (John 20:1, 19).
0 Replies
 
rstrats
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Jan, 2017 08:49 pm
Since we're into the new year, someone new looking in may know of examples.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 04:58 am
@rstrats,
I always thought it was written in Greek. This may help.

http://www.catholic.com/quickquestions/was-matthews-gospel-first-written-in-aramaic-or-hebrew
0 Replies
 
trevorw2539
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jan, 2017 05:19 pm
Who knows the answer? The story of Jonah is just that. A story. Possibly based on Oannes with man torso and lower body fish.
That Jesus the preacher believed it was the fact that he was brought up to believe these things. Just as children of Christian parents are today.
We don't even know when Jesus was crucified, because we don't know WHEN he was born. We have two crucifixion stories in the Bible. One tells us he was crucified on the eve of Passover. The other mentions just the Sabbath and the day after.
Passover was celebrated on the same day of the month each year - just like Christmas. So the day changes each year. If we don't know the year we can't know the day on which Passover occurred. There would have been 3 Sabbaths in one week. 2 normal Sabbaths and the Passover Sabbath (Shabbatt in Hebrew).

Study Jewish ritual and the Biblical stories don't make sense.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

There is a word for that! - Discussion by wandeljw
Best Euphemism for death and dying.... - Discussion by tsarstepan
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Question by lululucy
phrase/name of male seducer - Question by Zah03
Shameful sexist languge must be banned! - Question by neologist
Three Word Phrase I REALLY Hate to See - Discussion by hawkeye10
Is History an art or a science? - Question by Olivier5
"Rooms" in a cave - Question by shua
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Is Matthew 12:40 Using Common Idiomatic Language?
Copyright © 2017 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 02/24/2017 at 08:50:34