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"Thy kingdom come". What's that about?

 
 
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 02:39 pm
Many people repeat these words of Jesus, often several times a day. To what is Jesus referring?
 
View best answer, chosen by neologist
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 02:45 pm
@neologist,
Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate.
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 02:55 pm
@George,
George wrote:
Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate.
Oh great! Someone forcing me to find a translation, thereby exposing me as linguistically challenged.
All hope abandon, ye who enter in.
If I didn't know better, I would say that is why the priest never explained adveniat regnum tuum
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 02:56 pm
@neologist,
. . . but you do know better?
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 03:00 pm
@George,
George wrote:
. . . but you do know better?
I would think Jesus was expressing faith in Daniel 2:44
George
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 03:02 pm
@neologist,
Oh great, someone forcing me to consult the Book of Daniel!
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 03:04 pm
@George,
George wrote:
Oh great, someone forcing me to consult the Book of Daniel!
Hee hee: (Daniel 2:44) . . .“And in the days of those kings the God of heaven will set up a kingdom that will never be brought to ruin. And the kingdom itself will not be passed on to any other people. It will crush and put an end to all these kingdoms, and it itself will stand to times indefinite. . .
George
 
  4  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 03:10 pm
@neologist,
Sounds good to me, though I prefer to think of him as predicting the Age
of Aquarius.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 03:47 pm
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

Many people repeat these words of Jesus, often several times a day. To what is Jesus referring?



It's an archaic imperative...[we pray that] thy kingdom [shall] come... the Kingdom Of God.

neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 04:01 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:
neologist wrote:
Many people repeat these words of Jesus, often several times a day. To what is Jesus referring?

It's an archaic imperative...[we pray that] thy kingdom [shall] come... the Kingdom Of God.
Yeah,but. Is that a real kingdom with real people?
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 04:19 pm
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

contrex wrote:
neologist wrote:
Many people repeat these words of Jesus, often several times a day. To what is Jesus referring?

It's an archaic imperative...[we pray that] thy kingdom [shall] come... the Kingdom Of God.
Yeah,but. Is that a real kingdom with real people?


Is that a real question...or did you just have an extra question mark sitting around with nothing else to do?
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 04:27 pm
@Frank Apisa,
I guess some folks have different ideas such as 'the kingdom is in your. heart', stuff like that. But this phone has a lot of question marks. See????????
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  4  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 05:34 pm
@neologist,
To what is Jesus referring? Obviously to the Kingdom of God. It was thought by the Hebrews who believed in the prophecies of the Old Testament that the Messiah would come to bring the Kingdom of God to replace the shoddy and sinful world in which they dwelt. Jesus himself apparently thought that this was his role also. It would explain why among his last words on the cross was the perplexed question, "My God, why hast thou foresaken me?" Because it wasn't happening. His imminent death didn't seem to be working to replace Roman rule with God's rule. So among early Christians the whole Milennial apocalyptic vision came into being -- the Kingdom of God was not yet here, but it was at hand and would materialize when the conditions were right. Thus, to this day, some Christians exhort God, asking for his kingdom to come.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 06:35 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:

To what is Jesus referring? Obviously to the Kingdom of God. It was thought by the Hebrews who believed in the prophecies of the Old Testament that the Messiah would come to bring the Kingdom of God to replace the shoddy and sinful world in which they dwelt. Jesus himself apparently thought that this was his role also. It would explain why among his last words on the cross was the perplexed question, "My God, why hast thou foresaken me?" Because it wasn't happening. His imminent death didn't seem to be working to replace Roman rule with God's rule. So among early Christians the whole Milennial apocalyptic vision came into being -- the Kingdom of God was not yet here, but it was at hand and would materialize when the conditions were right. Thus, to this day, some Christians exhort God, asking for his kingdom to come.
This was certainly the expectation of many, but I don't think Jesus. He even said in Matthew 24:36 " . . .Concerning that day and hour nobody knows, neither the angels of the heavens nor the Son, but only the Father. . ."
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 09:35 pm
@neologist,
Ok, but in answer to your original question, 'Thy kingdom come' still refers to an expectation of the Kingdom of God on earth.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Apr, 2013 10:29 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:
Ok, but in answer to your original question, 'Thy kingdom come' still refers to an expectation of the Kingdom of God on earth.
As I see it, yes. Current governments will not fare well under that arrangement.
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Tue 30 Apr, 2013 02:15 pm
@neologist,
neologist wrote:

Lustig Andrei wrote:
Ok, but in answer to your original question, 'Thy kingdom come' still refers to an expectation of the Kingdom of God on earth.
As I see it, yes. Current governments will not fare well under that arrangement.


All current governments would become extinct automatically under those conditions.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Apr, 2013 04:15 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:
neologist wrote:
Lustig Andrei wrote:
Ok, but in answer to your original question, 'Thy kingdom come' still refers to an expectation of the Kingdom of God on earth.
As I see it, yes. Current governments will not fare well under that arrangement.
All current governments would become extinct automatically under those conditions.
How come one can't hear that in the churches?
0 Replies
 
1Prince
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Apr, 2013 08:48 pm
@neologist,
If you are referring to the prayer called the" Our Father" Jesus is saying that Gods kingdom will come when His will is done on earth as it is in Heaven.

Remember, No one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born from above. No one can enter the kingdom of God unless they are born of water and spirit. Flesh makes flesh spirit makes spirit. Don ot be amazed you must all be born from above.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Apr, 2013 09:26 pm
@1Prince,
1Prince wrote:
If you are referring to the prayer called the" Our Father" Jesus is saying that Gods kingdom will come when His will is done on earth as it is in Heaven.

Remember, No one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born from above. No one can enter the kingdom of God unless they are born of water and spirit. Flesh makes flesh spirit makes spirit. Don ot be amazed you must all be born from above.
I see you are referring to John 3:5. "Most truly I say to you, Unless anyone is born from water and spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God." Does this verse account for all who receive everlasting life?
 

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