21
   

How many Trump supporters do we have on a2k?

 
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 06:09 pm
@roger,
That's the part that frightens me. It used to just bewilder me, but it is no longer just something I can hope will be cured by education or experience, it is something I actually fear.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 06:14 pm
@roger,
When the silent majority has a spokesperson like Trump, they come out of the woodworks when they feel safe that such a wealthy American would speak their language. Most don't understand the Constitution or what America is all about.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 07:49 pm
@glitterbag,
I am thinking all of this is clurge, an emulsion of fly a way snippets of fervor about something.

We need donuts..
0 Replies
 
onevoice
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Jan, 2016 08:17 pm
@Ragman,
Bravo Ragman! Very well said!
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2016 03:19 pm
@onevoice,
I wonder if anybody will ask Trump how he would handle the situation in Oregon. I think that would be incredibly entertaining.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2016 03:46 pm
@glitterbag,
http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/donald-trump-oregon-militia

Quote:
publishedJANUARY 6, 2016, 7:51 AM EST 1139 Views
Donald Trump on Tuesday expressed disapproval of the militia that took over a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon over the weekend.

In an interview with The Hill, the real estate mogul agreed with his fellow Republican presidential candidates who have called for the group of armed men to stand down.

"You have to maintain law and order, no matter what," Trump told The Hill.

Numerous presidential candidates have criticized the militia and called on them to leave the Oregon refuge, including Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL), and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2016 06:48 pm
@ehBeth,
Expressing disapproval and calling for a stand down is dandy. I want to know what that bloated idiot would do if those tax cheats don't leave and dig in for the long haul, as if they now own the property of the American people.



ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2016 07:22 pm
@glitterbag,
What I'm finding interesting is that I can't find one word from Mr. Sanders on this. One ref yesterday that the media had asked and hadn't received a response. I hope Mr. Sanders can think faster on his feet than his reaction to both BLM issues.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2016 08:16 pm
@ehBeth,
OK, I hope he lives up to your expectations.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Jan, 2016 08:22 pm
@glitterbag,
who?
glitterbag
 
  4  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 12:40 am
@ehBeth,
Bernie.

I don't think Bernie can win, but I respect him. Also, I don't see Bernie putting boots on the ground in more Middle Eastern Countries. But I do worry about a clown like Trump thinking he can frighten China, North Korea or Russia by his his sheer bravado. Well maybe if he was buying real estate, but even that's a fantasy only Trump can envision.

Trump tells us he is very very wealthy, but I can't imagine him turning over control to anyone. A President cannot legally run a business and hold that office. Other wise, we would wind up like the peoples governed by Ferdinand Marcos or Vladimir Putin.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 10:36 am
@glitterbag,
Good points. Trump is a control freak, and only wants more power.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 12:06 pm
@glitterbag,
What expectations do you think I have of Mr. Sanders?

bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 09:17 pm
I think a more important question would be, "how many Trump supporters are even legally allowed to vote?"
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 09:20 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
It's already been shown my the media that Trump supporters are the older, white, uneducated. They can vote.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 09:27 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I'm older, white, and not as well educated as some around here. I defy you to show where I have shown support for trump.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 09:32 pm
@roger,
you're missing an important factor

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/trump-supporters-appear-to-be-misinformed-not-uninformed/

Quote:
One way to understand Trump’s longevity is to look more closely at his supporters. Trump’s backers tend to be whiter, slightly older and less educated than the average Republican voter. But perhaps more importantly, his supporters have shown signs of being misinformed. Political science research has shown that the behavior of misinformed citizens is different from those who are uninformed, and this difference may explain Trump’s unusual staying power.


I don't think anyone can fairly say that you are an uninformed or misinformed member of your society.

ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 09:34 pm
@ehBeth,
from same link

Quote:
As Kuklinski and his colleagues established, in the U.S., the most misinformed citizens tend to be the most confident in their views and are also the strongest partisans. These folks fill the gaps in their knowledge base by using their existing belief systems. Once these inferences are stored into memory, they become “indistinguishable from hard data,” Kuklinski and his colleagues found.

Furthermore, in 2010, political scientists Brendan Nyhan1 and Jason Reifler2 found that when misinformed citizens are told that their facts are wrong, they often cling to their opinions even more strongly with what is known as defensive processing, or the “backfire effect.”

Strong partisans are more likely to participate in the primary process, making it also likely that at least some highly engaged primary voters are also confidently misinformed and unwilling to accept contradictory evidence.

Telltale signs of misinformation, for example, were on display in a focus group of Trump supporters run by Republican media consultant Frank Luntz. Not only did negative information about Trump that was presented by Luntz to the group strengthen support for the candidate, participants held on more confidently to their misinformation as the session progressed. As Nyhan and Reifler’s research suggests, attempts to present corrections and generate counterarguments to the group’s beliefs only strengthened their opinions. The persistent claims by Trump and his supporters that his critics are too concerned with political correctness is a good example of this psychological process at work.

It is in Trump’s interest to allow misinformation — such as his statements about immigrants or Muslim Americans — to flourish. New work by Jennifer Hochschild of Harvard and Katherine Levine Einstein of Boston University found that there are incentives for politicians to keep citizens both misinformed and politically active. For most politicians, it doesn’t make sense to use precious resources to try to move or dissuade people from their incorrect positions — especially if this misinformation supports the political actor’s policy positions or legislative goals (as it does in Trump’s case). Instead, “the investment of resources goes much further in efforts to work around, accommodate, or even encourage the active misinformed,” the researchers write. Moreover, Hochschild and Einstein remind us that people find psychological comfort in having their opinions validated by others, especially by elites. So, there are many cases in which it makes more sense for politicians to encourage people to stay misinformed rather than try to provide them with accurate information



Interesting (if you're a nerd) links to research on that page
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 09:39 pm
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/31/upshot/donald-trumps-strongest-supporters-a-certain-kind-of-democrat.htm

Quote:
His very best voters are self-identified Republicans who nonetheless are registered as Democrats. It’s a coalition that’s concentrated in the South, Appalachia and the industrial North, according to data provided to The Upshot by Civis Analytics, a Democratic data firm.

Mr. Trump’s huge advantage among these groups poses a challenge for his campaign, because it may not have the turnout operation necessary to mobilize irregular voters.

But it is just as big a challenge for the Republican Party, which has maintained its competitiveness in spite of losses among nonwhite and young voters by adding older and white voters, many from the South. These gains have helped the party retake the House, the Senate and many state governments. But these same voters may now be making it harder for the party to broaden its appeal to nonwhite and younger people — perhaps even by helping to nominate Mr. Trump.


an overall interesting article

lots of charts and stuff
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Jan, 2016 09:43 pm
@ehBeth,
Interesting info: Makes a lot of sense in this environment.
0 Replies
 
 

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