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Colonoscopy for recreation and family fun.

 
 
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 01:59 am
I had a colonoscopy today. My fourth. It's kind of a drag, actually. So you may wonder why I tagged it as recreation.

Well, a friend of mine got colon cancer about 12 years ago and it was left untreated until too late. It metastasized into bone cancer and he died a most painful death. And that's not to mention the humiliation he endured as he lost control of his bodily functions towards the end.

Scared the bejeezus outta me. I gotta tell ya. I went in for my colonoscopy the following month. The result? Nasty polyps. If my friend had not died, by now I probably would have met his same fate, because I've never believed anything like that could happen to me. My attention to this is the reason my wife and I are now able to enjoy many bouts of recreation and family trips.

The moral? Whatever is the worst thing that can happen, might happen.

Take care of yourselves A2kers. Get those exams. Take those tests. Be around for the times when your family has fun. They need you.

Oh. And today's result? 4 benign polyps. I'm glad to be rid of them.
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 1,601 • Replies: 20

 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 02:03 am
Not the funnest way to spend a day off, but I agree that it's one of the best. I had one a couple of years ago and am due for another. Clean bill of health the first time. Needed more sedatives or anesthetic, though. http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb192/DinahFyre/smiley_panic.gif What did they give you to help you through?
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 10:33 am
@FBM,
I don't remember exactly what they used. But they cautioned me that I would likely forget some of what happened. I do remember discomfort during the procedure. But heck. I'm good for another few years now.
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  0  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 10:59 am
I wouldn't advise anyone NOT to get one but the latest data is sounding a lot like that on mammograms - statistically not necessarily a net positive.

I decided not to have them based on the data. There is the chance that I could lose on that choice and get a preventable disease and I'm prepared to accept that outcome.

But, I will not allow myself or those I care about to suffer with my 'horrible death' should it be eminent. I will arrange for my own final exit before that happens. I have no moral quams about it either. Hey, even Jesus Christ sanctioned it. One of the first cases of 'suicide by cop' I know of. I guess Socrates was the first.

jespah
 
  3  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 11:04 am
@neologist,
Good on ya for taking care of yourself.

A colonoscopy beats the crap (pun a little intended) out of colon cancer.
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  3  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 02:53 pm
@Leadfoot,
Well, with colon cancer, as far as I know, first there's pain, then excruciating pain, then colonostomy with the bag and all, then maybe it metatistisizes, maybe not. At what point will you make the decision to shuffle off this mortal coil? BTW, keep in mind that by then you will have had several colonoscopies under much less comfortable conditions .

One thing that has always bemused me is the failure of most folks to understand that death is rarely akin to a flip of the switch in the middle of a peaceful night's sleep. As often as not it is accompanied by unspeakable pain and humiliation. We can't predict our future; but we may be able to direct it.
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 03:08 pm
I just sent a link over from chai's thread, same subject.
http://able2know.org/topic/139438-1
Really too important a topic to ignore.
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 04:03 pm
@neologist,
I'm sure you're right about the progression of pain and I don't begrudge anyone who decides on prevention via colonoscopy. And if you wait until the pain starts, it's probably too late for treatment too. I don't plan on getting any of that either. When it gets to the point of serious pain, I'll be gone.

These are deeply personal choices and there is no right answer for everyone. I'm just saying that I'm comfortable with my choice to not test and then not treat. I'd probably feel different if I wasn't into the last 1/3 of my life here. I've had an incredible ride and if it ends tomorrow, it'd be OK.

These are the kind of questions everyone should contemplate. That they don't is a major reason why health care is so F'd up. Last time I checked, the average American consumes over 60% of their life time health care expenses during the last 6 months of their life, and obviously it did little good to preserve their life and they often spend those months in misery.
Joe Sixpack
 
  3  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 04:15 pm
@Leadfoot,
What will your family think if you just check out on your terms?
Last third of your life?
Are you saying what comes next is, what? Crisco sandwich?
I'm enjoying every minute of my doddering, fumbling old age.
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 05:13 pm
@Joe Sixpack,
If my family can't accept my decision about what to do with my own life - ****'em.
I've done the best I can to teach them to respect every human's right to determine their own destiny. And in reality, they would be thankfull that I save them and me from the indignity of emptying my bedpan or disposing of my colostomy bag (or depressing visits to a hospice facility). I like to think they will smile if they learn that my remains are found in the wreckage of an airplane on some Colorado mountain top.

Oh, trust me, I AM enjoying my last years, and without the thought they will be burdened with my care IF a disease like colon cancer takes me. They'll probably enjoy any wealth I leave behind instead of having it go to a nursing home. I'm doing the best I can to spend it all before I go, but the damn stuff keeps accumulating. So far, I've been disgustingly healthy though.
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 05:25 pm
@Leadfoot,
Well, you can save the family the troubles you refer to and the pains and the expense by getting an occasional butt check.

Just sayin'
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 05:33 pm
@neologist,
Yeah, then you'll probably go like a drooling fool after a stroke or heart attack.

Ya, gotta go some way or another.

Be kind to them, write up your will & DNR order now...
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 05:39 pm
Good idea to bring this up occasionally neo. This, and mammograms.

Honestly, mammograms today are so ridiculously easy. There's not even any discomfort. Seriously.

For the colonoscopy, that's easy peasy too. You don't remember a thing. As a bonus, you get to take the best nap ever when you come home.

Leadfoot, the idea of not taking advantage of routine, readily available and physically easy testing that could is a forgein concept to me, and in my opionin, foolish.

Sure, it's your funeral, literally.

The stastics and odds are of course in your favor, but why not take advantage of what modern medicine has to offer, particularly when there's not even discomfort involved?

0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 05:49 pm
@Leadfoot,
Leadfoot wrote:

Yeah, then you'll probably go like a drooling fool after a stroke or heart attack.


You have no idea how anyone will "probably" go.

Going of cancer would definately not be my preference.

As far as being a "drooling fool" after a stroke or heart attack, wow, you really don't understand these things at all, do you?

Very few people end up that incapacitated by strokes, especially if you do the steps that are necessary immediately when you suspect you or a loved one is having one.

As far as a heart attack, my husband had a massive heart attack back in 2000, and he's not drooling, and certainly no fool. Because he got immediate help, and is taking care of himself, including regular doctors visits, he's had 15 good years, and will most likely have many more before he sells the farm. If he hadn't yeah, he would have been dead a long time ago. Seems to me he's happy he's not.

One good thing coming out of your comments leadfoot, is that people are seeing how foolish you're being, and will be more likely choose a different way than yours.

Yes, we all indeed must die of something. I'd rather not do so of something I could have prevented, and not just leave it in the hands of Fate, and go in a painful, extended way.



neologist
 
  3  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 06:04 pm
@chai2,
Reminds me of a Woody Allen quote.
I hope I get it right:
Quote:
I'm not afraid to die. I just don't want to be there when it happens.
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Nov, 2015 08:53 pm
@chai2,
Quote:
You have no idea how anyone will "probably" go.
Of course I don't. But I'm addicted to hyperbole. Peace girl, enjoy your last days on the farm with your guy...
chai2
 
  4  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2015 11:16 am
@Leadfoot,
Thanks, I am a peace leadfoot.

However, the reason I pointed that out to you is that I think too many people just hear someone say "probably this or that" and they don't bother to think about it for themselves any longer, and take it for the truth.

I believe that is one of the ways how really foolish beliefs and myths get started.

People hear "well, we all have to die of something" without considering we have a lot of control over whether it will be quick and either painless or relatively painless, or some prolonged pain, even agony because we didn't want to take some simple precautionary measures.

My personal opinion is that some people are so wrapped up in their "rights" to do this or that, or not to, they cut off their noses to spite their face.

Do I like to get mammograms, pelvic exams, colonoscopies? Of course not. But I kind of like not being an idiot about it, and want to be aware of what's going on in my body.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Nov, 2015 11:34 am
@chai2,
Besides. The use of the word "probably" isn't hyperbole.

Another example of how a person states something, somehow making it true.
Leadfoot
 
  0  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2015 05:39 am
@chai2,
OK, if you want to talk facts, here it is:
Quote:

More than half of the deaths that occur as a result of heart disease are in men. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US with around 611,105 deaths each year. Coronary heart disease costs the US $108.9 billion each year and is the most common type of heart disease.


Look it up youself if you don't believe it. I didn't "somehow make it true".
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Sun 8 Nov, 2015 09:53 am
@Leadfoot,
Yes, this is a well known fact.

And your point is?

Actually leadfoot, every single person on the planet, men and women, eventually dies of heart failure.

100% of us.

In addition, leadfoot, the Number One cause of heart disease is Smoking, which is 100% in our control. Not unlike choosing to take other preventative measures for many other diseases.

But, very foolish people say "it is my right to smoke" Yes, it is. But the consequence is you are very much more likely to develop heart disease. Just as very foolish people say "it is my right not to get regular exams to ensure other things aren't wrong with me."



Please don't take neo's thread and turn it into some kind of agrument that, in essense is just saying "Well, we all die of something"

I'm not going to respond to your foolishness anymore.
 

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