7
   

"Two Beers, please"

 
 
fbaezer
 
Reply Mon 19 Apr, 2004 07:43 pm
This is a development from another thread, suggested by Rounin.

Who do you say "Two beers, please", in any language?

Dos cervezas, por favor - Spanish
Due birre, per favore - Italian
Dva piva, molim - Serbo-Croatian (basic survival stuff I learned in the Balkans)
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 27,211 • Replies: 43

 
fishin
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Apr, 2004 07:48 pm
If my German isn't to rusty it'd be "Zwei Biere, bitte"
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Apr, 2004 07:50 pm
Twoicus beericuses, pleaseicus -- Latin
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patiodog
 
  4  
Reply Mon 19 Apr, 2004 07:58 pm
Gus, that's, oo-tay eers-bay, ease-play. You rusty Roman, you.
0 Replies
 
Ethel2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Apr, 2004 09:03 pm
zwei beir bitte.................

but Hoss Cartright used to say, "ein beir bitte" as he slammed his fist down onto the bar.........I was living in Germany during the years of Hoss and his brothers..........the Germans just loved him!
0 Replies
 
Rounin
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 09:09 am
To øl, takk - Norwegian
To øl, tak - Danish, I hope
Två öl, tack - Swedish

"halvlitere" ("half litres") can replace "øl" if you're afraid of being cheated. Wink

ビールを二つください / biiru wo futatsu kudasai - Japanese

(Using counters for "boxes"/"bottles"/"glasses" of beer is preferred to using a generic counter.)
0 Replies
 
danload
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 11:50 am
Deux bières, s'il-vous-plait - French
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 11:55 am
hi danload, welcome to A2K Smile
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 12:06 pm
Dve piva, prosim - Czech and Slovak
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 12:39 pm
For those, who want to know these linguistic subtleties and make a show of knowledge in foreign languages - just combine these two links :wink:

numbers in 450 languages

How to ask for a beer in 113 languages

And for the polite amongst us, here's as third link

"Please" in over 270 languages
0 Replies
 
danload
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 12:43 pm
fbaezer wrote:
hi danload, welcome to A2K Smile


hi fbaezer!
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 05:41 pm
good canadians would order "a couple a' pints" , "suds" , "two EX" (molson export). haven't been in a beer-parlour in a really long time; i remember when we came to canada there were separate entrances for the "men's" beer parlour and the "ladies and escorts" , and never the 'twain would meet. i also remember that there were LARGE salt and pepper shakers on the tables which would be used to "spike" the suds. oh, the good ole days ! hbg (i don't think the beer parlours ever made much money on me). hbg ... btw. when we came to canada one had to purchase a LICENSE to be allowed to buy libations in a provincial (government) liquor store, and people on the "indian list" could not make purchases !
0 Replies
 
Cioccolato
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 06:14 pm
Georgian:
ორი ლუდი, თუ შეიძლება. (ori ludi, tu sheidzleba.)

Russian:
Два пива, пожалуйста. (dva piva, pozhaluista.)

Turkish:
İki bira, lütfen.

:wink:
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Apr, 2004 06:18 pm
Cioccolatto, Georgian writing looks so sensual.
What's that alphabet?
0 Replies
 
Cioccolato
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Apr, 2004 02:37 pm
Georgian has her own alphabet! The version used today is called "მხედრული" (mkhedruli).
0 Replies
 
D1Doris
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Apr, 2004 02:07 am
What a beautiful alphabet!!!


Dutch- twee bier, alsjeblieft (or 'alstublieft' when you're being polite)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Apr, 2004 02:21 am
Cioccolato wrote:
Georgian has her own alphabet! The version used today is called "მხედრული" (mkhedruli).


Quote:
Georgian kartuli ena official language of the Republic of Georgia, whose spoken form has many dialects, usually divided into East Georgian and West Georgian groups. These, together with the related Mingrelian (Megrelian), Laz (Chan), and Svan languages, make up the Kartvelian, or South Caucasian, language family. Georgian is also spoken in parts of Azerbaijan and northeastern Turkey and in many villages in the region of Esfahan in Iran.

The Georgian literary tradition, in the form of inscriptions, dates back to the 5th century. Many literary monuments remain from the Old Georgian period (5th-11th century), among them a translation of the Bible. The New Georgian literary language is based on an East Georgian dialect and originated in the secular literature of the 12th century; it became fully established in the middle of the 19th century. Old Georgian was used for religious purposes until the beginning of the 19th century.

New Georgian has five vowels and 28 consonants; Old Georgian had five vowels but 30 consonants. Georgian has roughly the same parts of speech as do the Indo-European languages. The noun has seven cases, and the adjective, usually preceding the noun it modifies, agrees with the noun in case but not in number.

Historically, the Georgian language was written in two scripts: Khutsuri, an ecclesiastical script of 38 letters, including 6 vowels, is no longer in use; Mkhedruli, a lay alphabet originally of 40 letters (7 are now obsolete), 6 of them vowels, is the script commonly used at present in printing and handwriting. Both scripts are written from left to right.

The Old Georgian script must have been derived from the Greek alphabet. This is suggested by the order of the alphabet (which reflects the Greek sequence) and the shape of some of the characters, although the angular shape of the majority of signs of the Old Georgian script appears to be a result of a free creation of its inventor.

The modern Georgian script is based on the round-form cursive, which was developed from the angular book script of the 9th century; the latter was a direct descendant of the Old Georgian system.

"Georgian Language." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2004. Encyclopædia Britannica Premium Service.
22 Apr. 2004 <http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=37228>.
0 Replies
 
Cioccolato
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Apr, 2004 11:59 am
Yeah, the Georgian ასომთავრული asomtavruli alphabet, which was used up until somewhere in the 9th Century looks, like it was modeled after Greek, but it was (according to most scholars) invented by pre-Christian Georgian priests (412 BC) and then revamped by the Georgian King Parnavaz (er "Farnavaz," but I don't think Georgians ever call him that). I don't know if the Armenians say the Georgian alphabet was created by Mesrob Mashdots any longer, but he was the creator of the Armenian alphabet as far as I know.

The ნუსხა-ხუცური ( nuskha-khutsuri ) style of alphabet came after asomtavruli (it was a combination of asomtavruli and a new one called khutsuri). Together they were used to write Religious manuscripts, texts, etc. asomtavruli letters had been used only to write any necessary capitals (for titles, etc.) in the nuskha-khutsuri alphabet.

Later somewhere in the 11th Century a secular alphabet developed out of nuskha-khutsuri called mkhedruli ("military"). Up until the 18th Century, mkhedruli was used for everything secula,r but from then on it became the primary alphabet which is still used today.

When reading relatively "modern" Religious Georgian texts, you might see nuskha-khutsuri writing in some of them, for Religious emphasis I guess. Otherwise everything is mkhedruli, which is my personal favorite...oof, and mkhedruli doesn't use capital letters either, except for special cases. It's nice!

Cool

I kept capitalizing "Religious," don't ask - it's a habit. Laughing
0 Replies
 
Locke15
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Apr, 2004 01:09 pm
Rounin wrote:
To øl, takk - Norwegian
To øl, tak - Danish, I hope
Två öl, tack - Swedish

"halvlitere" ("half litres") can replace "øl" if you're afraid of being cheated. Wink

ビールを二つください / biiru wo futatsu kudasai - Japanese

(Using counters for "boxes"/"bottles"/"glasses" of beer is preferred to using a generic counter.)


How many languges do you speak?
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Apr, 2004 01:17 pm
Look, I don't care what you are trying to tell me, I WANT TWO BEERS that is two as in these two fingers here, and BEER as in that siphon in front of your nose, you silly foreign person. (Esperanto)

The above phrase can be used anywhere.
0 Replies
 
 

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