17
   

Whats the point in living?

 
 
Germlat
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2013 12:58 pm
@dalehileman,
Unless you truly have a brain imbalance..then going to see a doctor concerning your inability to cope is fruitless ...but it could also turn you into somebody you're not. Pain can be very revealing ..and can actually promote growth.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Dec, 2013 03:00 pm
@Germlat,
This thread might bear upon our impasse--if indeed that's what it is

http://able2know.org/topic/228605-1
0 Replies
 
lahore
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2013 07:07 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn, that's actually the point. My brain simply is not accepting the fact that I wasn't suppose to make a big splash on the society.

I have come to the conclusion that it was the wrong education system that has brought me to this stage. My academic records were extraordinary and we were told all the time that you are going to cHanGe the world (Which simply was a lie). As soon as my academics were over, I came to know that the REAL world doesn't need any extraordinary records. And that I have wasted my past 16 years in learning the crap. Specifically, industry of my country doesn't need any brilliant minds because there isn't any complicated hi-fi work to do.

What I should have done in my teenage was enjoying my life. In that way, I would have learnt soft-skills needed to run the industry. I would have got average grades which is perfectly fine. I would have fucked a lot of girls (kidding). and I would have enjoyed every moment of my life and still be enjoying instead of complaining here on this forum.

I will tell my kidz to do so (If I managed to have some)

So in short, I am more like a Robot than a human... Who hasn't got anything to do Smile
Mame
 
  3  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2013 08:47 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

Who hasn't felt this?

I haven't felt this.

Finn dAbuzz wrote:

There are two avenues you should explore:

Your depression may be a result of a brain chemical imbalance and there are drugs that can do wonders to correct this. Go see your doctor and be honest with him/her about how you feel.

Rearrange your priorities. You don't have to make a big splash on society. Chances are that if you finish your schooling obtain a good paying job, and then find someone with which to share your life, and have children, you will very clearly make a difference.


Uh… why does it have to involve another person and children? Many people are happy all by themselves.

Germlat
 
  4  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2013 11:22 am
@lahore,
So do the things you didn't do then now. Why can't you sow your wild oats now? So you're older and more educated..not seeing the downside unless you are married and have those regrets. Have you given any thoughts to working with international companies..perhaps relocating? I can imagine the frustration over not being able to experience fulfillment in your chosen career but that not were it has to end. I know a biologist who was sick of the crappy pay and left his field to work in finance. All they cared about was him having a degree..he know makes more money than 95% households in the U.S. My brother in law has a degree in astrophysics and currently works for a telecommunications company in Australia...he is very financially well off and respected. Don't give up!!
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 02:17 am
@lahore,
Hey, you can still make a big splash on society and if it's really important to you that you do (I would hope in a good way) then setting yourself on the hard course to do so should occupy your mind well enough.

You haven't wasted a moment in learning. Knowledge is a good thing in and of itself, you never know when it will come in handy, and if nothing else, learning new things keeps your brain dynamic and healthy.

I suspect that you may have enjoyed your life more than you are now willing to admit, but if this isn't the case then you are right, you should have. That's no reason why you can't start enjoying it more now. Whatever the reason for your not enjoying your early life more, it's not a reason for not enjoying it now.

Realize though that there is a huge difference between enjoying life and taking pleasure. Unless you are incredibly well off, a life of pure hedonism is not financially sustainable. I would argue it's not emotionally sustainable either, but you don't even get to that issue unless you're a scion of a very wealthy family.

You know life is not going to come to you and present you a package of contentment and school was never capable of providing one either. It's up to you. It's corny as hell, but it's true that the journey is more rewarding than the destination.

Finn dAbuzz
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 02:19 am
@Mame,
Good for you Mame. You must have been an extraordinary teenager.

I hope there are more like you, but I don't think so.

Uh...it doesn't have to involve another person or children, but it does, more often than it does not.
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 07:44 am
Quote:
'The meaning of life is finding your gift/the purpose of life is giving it away'
Pablo Picasso


One of my students introduced me to this quote, which I hadn't heard before. I think it's true, for me at least.
I was lucky enough to find what I loved to do early. I guess I just loved being a kid and learning and school so much that I decided I wanted to spend my days as an adult doing a job in that environment. It was the right choice for me. I could never imagine going to an office and sitting in a chair all day and I loved school, so it was a good fit.

My son, on the other hand, though very bright, didn't like school - he liked being outside, so he quit school as soon as he could. I was disappointed at first, but now realize he made the best decision for himself because his days are comprised of skiing every day. He found what he was good at (his gift) and what he loved to do and found a way to do it. I am relieved that it makes him happy. Nothing would make me more worried about him than for him to feel stuck, purposeless, frustrated and unhappy with his life.

That's what I would tell my children and the other that I teach - find what you love to do and a way to do it. If you don't, if you follow someone else's instructions or allow the expectations of others to rule your life and end up hating what you do each day, your life will seem very long, pointless, boring and disappointing. The unhappiest adults I know are the ones who have spent more than a third of their waking time getting to and doing something they have no passion for but have done to satisfy the requirements and expectations of society.

I want my children to be happy, first and foremost, and feel successful at creating the life they can enjoy. If my son had to sit in an office every day and was unhappy- I don't care if he was making a million dollars a year - I would feel sad for him.

Good luck in finding an activity or way to occupy your days that makes you feel happy and fulfilled.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 08:11 am
@lahore,
The point of living is to find the point of living.

It's clear you haven't found it yet so keep looking. There are forks in the road and you choose which path to follow. It sounds like you're standing at a fork. Look ahead and pick one that may (or may not) lead you to your point in living. It's personal - it's YOUR point in living. Not mine or anyone else's. We each have one to search for. Some people never find it. Some never look for it and plod through life as it's been scripted for them by others.

It's perfectly ok to stand at the fork for a while and contemplate your options (or your navel) before making a choice. Beware, however, of digging yourself into a hole. The deeper you dig the harder it is to climb out.
0 Replies
 
Germlat
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2013 08:30 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
I agree with you Finn. Sometimes people feel time was wasted as sacrifices don't pay up in the way you expected. I personally think it's about a collection of experiences that shape you. It's important to know when you've outgrown a certain shape and use the tools you have to forge a different path.
0 Replies
 
anonymously99
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Dec, 2013 07:19 pm
@lahore,
I understand the feeling.
Germlat
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Dec, 2013 04:50 pm
@anonymously99,
I say it's important to not fell alone
0 Replies
 
begily
 
  2  
Reply Mon 1 Dec, 2014 03:44 am
@lahore,
I understand this feeling rather well.

One thing I like to contemplate whenever I begin to feel like this is that nothing lasts. That feeling of utter futility is just another transient moment in this experience, which is inevitably going to change into some other feeling in a short few moments.
What that seems mean to me is that life is not in fact meaningless, at least not all the time, because it keeps changing!
This is just how I deal with it, but the fact that life is an ever changing experience means that we do not have to feel stuck with anything, even the thought that life is meaningless, because there is always something beyond any particular feeling or mood.
It works for me.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Mon 1 Dec, 2014 03:52 am
@lahore,
Quote:
Whats the point in living?
To have FUN !!!!!

JOY and beauty are the most important things!!!!!




Thus attesteth: David
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 1 Dec, 2014 02:02 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
bliss, very often sex.
And Hawk, three bottles or exotic imported brew Tuesday PM
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 1 Dec, 2014 02:05 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Quote:
Your depression may be a result of a brain chemical imbalance
BINGO Finn, a factor too long disregarded
Cold be excess or shortage
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Dec, 2014 02:06 pm
@Germlat,
Quote:
Unless you truly have a brain imbalance..then going to see a doctor concerning your inability to cope is fruitless
Absolutely right, Germ. Hard to say how one might approach. Experimentation somewhat unreliable and tedious
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Dec, 2014 07:36 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Quote:
Unless you truly have a brain imbalance..then going to see a doctor concerning your inability to cope is fruitless
Absolutely right, Germ. Hard to say how one might approach. Experimentation somewhat unreliable and tedious

Experimentation can be unreliable but it can be exciting and can give you hope. I think stagnation is worse...it can feel like a trap. I've had both good and bad results with experimentation. The choice to change led me to find a place of contentment.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Dec, 2014 11:35 am
@Germlat,
Quote:
The choice to change led me to find a place of contentment.
But Germ if you mean without resort to external action of some sort, that's hard to believe. However, some recoveries are mysteriously instantaneous tho of course you can't depend on such
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Dec, 2014 07:03 am
@dalehileman,
I've found myself dissatisfied with my circumstances at times, and decided to change something in either my behavior, attitude or environment. All of these changes were triggered by a desire for change and a lack of tolerance for the circumstances. The only way to change undesirable circumstances is by not becoming passive and taking action...unless a magical opportunity knocks at the door.
 

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