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THE SAMMICHES OF THE GODS . . .

 
 
bigdice67
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 07:54 am
http://us.news1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/uc/20040412/sft040412.gif
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 07:59 am
heeheeheeheeheeheeheeheeheehee . . .


mmmmmmmm . . . peanuts butter an' jelly beans . . .


okbye
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bigdice67
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 08:04 am
Don't forget "peanut butter EGG and jellybean"...
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BoGoWo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 08:10 am
Set; i'm dismayed at your incorrect English usage of the word 'sammiche'.
Having journeyed numerous times to this fair metropolis at the 'node' of the golden horseshoe of the worlds centre of 'culture'; you should be fully conversant with the proper spelling of the fine, and most honoured of 'confections'; i mean of course "sangwich" the true and proper version to be found 'rampant' on numerous thoroughfares hereabout, of the 'mediteranean' leaning.
You should know better! Shocked

and, on this topic, when i was a strapping lad of say, 15 years, or so (a number of weeks ago), i knew a fellow who made possibly the most elegant "earl" like creation that i have ever come accross;
he took two slices of white bread (Wonderbread - builds bodies 12 ways, Bambi - or the like) ladled librally, both pieces with ketchup
(Heinze, of course - is there any other kind?) from the bottle, need i mention; clamped, and chowed down.............

echtwcht!!!!
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 08:19 am
My mother used to make BLT's with braunschweiger added... B2LT. I recommend it and also, the grilled Reuben sandwiches from Rose's* in Portland. Three inches high, cut three ways on huge grilled slabs of medium rye bread with a thick stack of roasted turkey, a thinner stack of corned beef, thin slice of melted swiss cheese, warm sauerkraut and a large dill pickle on the side.

*now closed, but it was famous in its day.


As a child I thoughtfully made yellow mustard and sugar sandwiches on white bread.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 05:38 pm
BoGoWo wrote:
Set; i'm dismayed at your incorrect English usage of the word 'sammiche'.
Having journeyed numerous times to this fair metropolis at the 'node' of the golden horseshoe of the worlds centre of 'culture'; you should be fully conversant with the proper spelling of the fine, and most honoured of 'confections'; i mean of course "sangwich" the true and proper version to be found 'rampant' on numerous thoroughfares hereabout, of the 'mediteranean' leaning.
You should know better! Shocked


the sangwich is a truly tranna critter. i'd never heard of them til i moved here - and it still makes me giggle to hear IMPORTANT people say 'sangwich'
0 Replies
 
shepaints
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 06:38 pm
Well to me it is, SanDwich......I never fail to
get the most appreciative aaaaaaaaaaaaaah's
with the most basic sandwiches of grated cheddar with thin slices of tomato (perhaps with some slivers of onion) , salted and peppered on
white or whole wheat....without crusts and
cut into quarters.....Alternatively the same bread topped with cream cheese, salted and peppered with very thinly sliced cucumber..... all served on a bed of shredded lettuce....
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 06:41 pm
I hate sand on my wiches...takes too much water to melt 'em.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Apr, 2004 08:27 pm
Thread is gonna make me crazy . . . there was a place in Sligo, a kind of deli, and they made "Salad Sammiches"--which were heavy white Irish bread (but not soda bread, just regular yeast bread), buttered, of course (it was after all Ireland), with mayo, romaine--and piled thickly on that: paper thin white onion rings, thin sliced cucumbers and tomatoes, watercress (which is ubiquitous in the west country) for "spicieness," and the best of all, thinly sliced, small red radishes . . . it was an incredible feed . . . can't remember the name of the place, though . . .
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 01:03 am
Wow...I didn't they had vegetables in Ireland.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 05:36 am
Rolling Eyes

you left out the word "know," which is significant . . .
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margo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 05:46 am
we 'ave "sangers" 'ere!

Ham 'n' cheese sanger with Margo's Magic Mango chutney!
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 06:12 am
grilled i hope . . . mmmmmmmmm . . . grilled cheese . . .
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 06:38 am
Setanta wrote:
Rolling Eyes

you left out the word "know," which is significant . . .


I suppose that's why I didn't "know". Laughing
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 06:54 am
There is a place near me called "The Irish Sandwich Shop" and we wondered what an Irish sandwich was.

My friend says it's one with the bread in the middle.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 07:06 am
If one is ever travelling in Ireland, and can't find a recognizable restaurant right away, most pub serve sammiches at about lunch time. I recall most often getting lovely, generous and inexpensive sammiches made with shaved ham--mmmmmmmmmmm--ham sammiches . . .
0 Replies
 
shepaints
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 07:08 am
The Irish sandwiches sound wonderful Setanta.....
I hope they aren't served with those festive toothpicks as in BLTs.....I am scared of those things!
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 07:15 am
Naw, that would just get in the way. In the late 1970's, they were served in nice little baskets, quartered, with the crusts cut off, usually with lettuce and watercress in the sammich, and all laid on a linen napkin. These days, i'm sure they're served in a plastic basket, on paper, but the sammich should still be good. My landlady used to give me a large bag of sammiches to take to work with me each day, of a similar type (not always ham, she provided variety), and there were always more than i could eat. My less well-heeled co-workers used to "help me" with that at tea break, and they also got some of my tea. There is no way i can drink a half-a-gallon of hot, sweet tea with milk in a day's time. My landlady was concerned that i would be undernourished on the job.
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shepaints
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 07:29 am
I'm glad you mentioned tea, Setanta, growing
up as I did with a very British influence, tea and sandwiches were always served together.

Cav....If you dont mind me asking what innovative Chef's twist would you add to basic cheese and tomato or cucumber sandwiches?
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Apr, 2004 08:14 am
Those toothpicks look like something pygmys might use to bag small game, don't they?
0 Replies
 
 

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