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What are your pet peeves re English usage?

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 01:33 pm
@Linkat,
Of course I knew what you meant. But it has been done since centuries.

(It became a topic in English, French, German and Latin classes when I was at school about 50 years ago - only because my English teacher told me not to talk the talk if I couldn't walk the walk. And I wondered about that.)
rachaelnicolle
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 01:38 pm
@ailsagirl,
Writing 'i' instead of 'I'. I can stand this when it's a social media / text usage, but when companies or publications do this it drives me crazy!

Also just a general lack or disinterest in at least attempting proper spelling. Again, even more so with professional publications. Like, have you ever heard of proofreading?
0 Replies
 
rachaelnicolle
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 01:41 pm
@Grand Duke,
I'm American but attended college in Ireland, so my English is a mix of American and Irish/British. The first one seems correct to me? The second one drives me crazy because of the lack of oxford comma. In a list I feel it should be "The red, white, and blue".
0 Replies
 
nacredambition
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Aug, 2016 11:50 pm
@Linkat,
Quote:
I like to be efficient so I detest when one uses extra words or phases that are not necessary.


I hate prolixity.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Aug, 2016 02:01 am
@nacredambition,
I gag over liver and onions, bleeeck
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Sep, 2016 01:10 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

The significance of "in and of itself" (phony baloney grammatical objections ignored) is that it is classic Anglo-Saxon. The earliest English speakers were very fond of such repetition, or redundancy, if you prefer. "It is fitting and proper" is a classic example of this. More than fifteen hundred years aster the language stumbled to its feet, that trait remains.


Interesting insight... and it rings true. Thanks.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 Sep, 2016 01:50 pm
@Walter Hinteler,

Good point, Walter, but it's gone a bit mad recently, and the trait seems to be accelerating. A man writing in The Spectator last week made the same point as me, about medalling, with reference to reporting of the Olympic Games, but he has also noticed podium and gold used as verbs.
That is the sort of thing up with which I will not put.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 Sep, 2016 02:00 pm
@McTag,
McTag wrote:
gold used as verb
Just out of interest, I've looked that up: it's used in German at least since the 14th century, Old High German origin, but not known in other Germanic languages (Grimm noted that in his dictionary)
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 Sep, 2016 02:12 pm
@Walter Hinteler,

We've got gild. Which means literally, to cover something in gold (or to colour it gold), and is also used metaphorically.
As far as you and Mr Grimm are concerned, I think you may be barking up the wrong tree. But I can't speak for High German of course. English is quite enough for me to try to cope with.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 Sep, 2016 02:18 pm
@McTag,

We've also got geld, but you don't want to go there.
0 Replies
 
ekename
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Mar, 2017 05:47 am
Defiantly is definately one.
ekename
 
  2  
Reply Tue 21 Nov, 2017 08:06 pm
@ekename,
Lasnite on Family Freud a woman said she was the "desiccated driver" n i thought, mmm, she maybe coconuts but at lea- she's dry.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Nov, 2017 08:21 pm
@ekename,
fare, fair, fear,
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 21 Nov, 2017 11:10 pm
English spelling and the English use of the Roman alphabet is a sick joke.
Builder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Nov, 2017 01:13 am
@gungasnake,
English is actually a pidgin, or trade lingo, evidenced by the multiple inputs from the various stakeholders.
0 Replies
 
nacredambition
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Aug, 2018 12:06 am
Puns, mixed metaphors and cliches are like a red rag to a bull in a china shop.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Aug, 2018 01:38 pm
@nacredambition,
Oh, I just love to mix metaphors!
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Aug, 2018 02:18 pm
@roger,
here, hair, hear, hare
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Aug, 2018 03:21 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Don't have enough hair to count, but thanks for the conjugation.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Aug, 2018 06:46 pm
@roger,
Don't feel too bad. Many of us seniors are losing our hair at an alarming rate. So much for ego. Embarrassed 2 Cents
0 Replies
 
 

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