52
   

What are your pet peeves re English usage?

 
 
nacredambition
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Jul, 2016 08:21 am
Quote:
What are your pet peeves re English usage?


Half a kilderkin's a firkin merkin mirkle.
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Jul, 2016 04:44 am
@nacredambition,

I'd rather have a bottle in front o' me than a frontal lobotomy.
nacredambition
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Jul, 2016 12:44 am
@McTag,
For goodness McTag repost your riposte on the spoonerism thread.

I like any other dill does know the difference between here and there.

And don't rile me with out any of your rounded vowels.

My pet peevish prenunciation.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Jul, 2016 03:23 am
@nacredambition,
There is a growing annoying speech pattern in Merkin nglish. In news interviews, there is a growing use of short introductory phrases as answers to questions from an interviewer. These questions are usually reffering to practices employed by the interviewee.
FOO EXMPLE

"Do you brush your teeth with a birch branch"?

"I DO" (Usually spoken with an enthusiastic voice)

Its gotten to be a tired response used so frequently and I dont know when it began growing to become a clihe.

Listen for it on news programs
nacredambition
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 01:50 am
@farmerman,
I hate it when people say drivel when they mean dribble, so much so that I love it almost as much as the way it falls so glibly from my tongue, like glibble.

0 Replies
 
Builder
 
  2  
Reply Fri 15 Jul, 2016 02:18 am
"On any given day" is a phrase that needs extinction, as well as "as far as we can tell".

Screw that. If you're not sure, you can't make a judgement.
0 Replies
 
Sage of Main Street
 
  2  
Reply Sat 16 Jul, 2016 07:47 am
In general, the fact that the people in the media are so ignorant, yet their audience looks up to them as role models for language. This goes back to high-school English teachers who said we didn't have to study grammar; we could learn it by listening to the way educated people speak. First of all, people don't learn very accurately just by listening. Second, college education is a fraud, as proven by the ignorance and stupidity of broadcasters, who are practically all college graduates. They practice short-term learning there, cramming for exams and forgetting most of their temporary knowledge soon afterwards.
0 Replies
 
Sage of Main Street
 
  2  
Reply Sat 16 Jul, 2016 07:59 am
<b> Ambitious Imbeciles, On-Air Airheads </b>

"Oxymoron." The broadcasters who were too lazy to look it up in the dictionary and infected the language with this mistaken identity think that because of the way it sounds, it must mean something stupid. Actually, it is a clever phrase that is a contradiction only if taken literally, such as "boneless ribs, plastic glasses, or Kansas City, Missouri."

What they really should use instead of their clique's ignorant and simple-minded meaning of "oxymoron" is "a contradiction in terms," which is a claim that a logical phrase is illogical, but only according to their ideology, such as "Conservative Democrat" or "Liberal Republican."
0 Replies
 
Sage of Main Street
 
  2  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 03:42 pm
@Clary,
It's not hypercorrecting; don't let them off the hook. They are trying to sound more educated than they are, so it is phony grammar. They are also too lazy to learn and rely on what they hear.
0 Replies
 
Sage of Main Street
 
  2  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 03:45 pm
@kitchenpete,
I suspect it's a reaction to the lie we are told about people and things not being better or worse than others but only different.
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 04:10 pm
@ailsagirl,
Misuse of "literally"

My head literally explodes every time it happens
0 Replies
 
nacredambition
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 01:10 am
I'm peticularly peeved when I portray errant nonsense when I mean to display arrant nonsense.

0 Replies
 
coluber2001
 
  3  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 07:22 am
There is great confusion over the pronunciation of the word plantain, both the
banana-type fruit and the wild plant genus Plantago. Many people insist on plan'-tain. Others claim it's plan'-tin. I looked it up in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary--an old edition, admittedly--and the only pronunciation they give is plan'-n, as in mount'n, or curt'-n. You hear moun'-tin sometimes or cur'-tin, or cer'=tin, or ki'-tin, but mount'-n, curt'-n, cert'-n, and kit'-n are the standard pronunciation.

Also, dissect is pronounced dis-sect', not die'-sect, just as dissent is dis-sent', not die'-sent, and dissolve is dis-solve', not die'-solve.
MontereyJack
 
  4  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 08:14 am
I have noticed lately that nobody is "asking" somebody anything anymore. They are always "reaching out to" and it is beginning to drive me bonkers.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 06:44 pm
I have felt the same way for many years about people who don't want to tell me something, but want to "share" it with me.
Builder
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 06:46 pm
@Setanta,
Sharing is caring. Don'tcha know?
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 06:48 pm
@coluber2001,
Interesting. Didn't know that stuff, and have been pronouncing it wrong all this time.

With my bad memory, I'll probably continue to pronounce it wrong.
0 Replies
 
Builder
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 06:51 pm
@coluber2001,
Quote:
Also, dissect is pronounced dis-sect', not die'-sect, just as dissent is dis-sent', not die'-sent, and dissolve is dis-solve', not die'-solve.


The rest are fine, but dissect is Die Sect.

dis•sect (dĭ-sĕktˈ, dī-, dīˈsĕktˌ)
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 07:59 pm
Pronunciation is not subject to hard and fast rules. I have not, however, heard anyone who says eie-solve or die-ssent.
0 Replies
 
nacredambition
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Aug, 2016 08:21 pm
I hate to digress butjsay dissect either way.

http://howjsay.com/pronunciation-of-dissect
 

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