35
   

NASTY SANDY CHURNING UP THE COAST

 
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:25 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Amish don't use modern machinery.
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:25 am
@farmerman,
I live in Florida and had a home come apart under a cat5 storm so yes I take all kind of precautions to deal with a major hurricane but once more we are talking about a cat one that is barely a cat one.

Second good old New Orleans was build below sea level with poorly design and maintain flood walls and that is not the case even on the barrier islands off the east coast.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:26 am
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:
Amish don't use modern machinery.
Does that prevent them from getting insurance ?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:28 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Amish dont have any property insurance cause its too worldy. They believe in the strength of community to rebuild after a fire or storm damage.
Thats why the famous AMISH "barn raisings" are a gawkers delight in Lancaster County and surrounding Amish cunties of PA and Ohio.

We had 3 barn raisings in our area last year alone and one was from a barn that was destroyed by a lightning fore

PS, they usually DONT put up lightning rods cause they say its too "Hochmuut"or its a sign of pride in possession
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:29 am
I just love the news calling a barely cat 1 a super storm!!!!!!!!!!!
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:30 am
@farmerman,
As was just demonstrated, the more you explain and provide facts to rebut, the deeper the hole. Can't present such facts to a rusted closed mind.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:31 am
@BillRM,
as I said before, you are just guilty of one dimensional thinking, nothing more.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:32 am
@farmerman,
Off hand I would bet that the Amish build buildings that will laugh at the winds of a cat 1.

No press wood or beams that look like they belong to a doll house instead of homes and barns.

0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:33 am
@Ragman,
Quote:
As was just demonstrated, the more you explain and provide facts to rebut, the deeper the hole. Can't present such facts to a rusted closed mind.


How many hurricanes had you been in?
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:34 am
@farmerman,
Thank u.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:35 am
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:
I just love the news calling a barely cat 1 a super storm!!!!!!!!!!!
Thay told us to expect 5 inches of rain.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:36 am
@BillRM,
I'd estimate about 10. Why? Want a list of them? I've also been through tornadoes too. What bearing does that have? FWIW, I currently live in FL.
BillRM
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:40 am
@Ragman,
Sure why not as you are claiming that a barely cat one is a super storm that should be flee from so I would love to see what kind of hurricanes you base that opinion on.

I happen to know the difference between a major hurricane and a barely cat one and you seems not to for some reason.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:41 am
@Ragman,
Yeh, I can see where people quit discussing **** with Bill, he seems to want to make everything into a "Big Dick Contest"

He also likes to have it both ways. When I said that Katrina was the most expensice cleanup, he then tried to make it appear that it was because Nawlins didnt hve good preparations for the storm.
Either prepare or not prepare, there is no two sides from which to argue the point.

I aam proud to state that my geotech engineers did the principle foundation design for the NEW PUMP system for Nawlins flood controlpumps
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:43 am
@BillRM,
Quote:

How many hurricanes had you been in?


Here is the word from BIGGUS DICKUS
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 07:49 am
@farmerman,
And so on and so on!

BTW, I believe those pumps (plus the multi-front system of the new flood gates, reinforced levees and backup power systems) handled this season's Tropical storm (Isaac?) tests pretty well. Correct?
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 08:07 am
@Ragman,
yep. We were on pins and needles since its, as youve stated, a complex of inteacting structures and giamos that have turned the potential for another disaster into merely wet feet in Metarie
Ragman
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 08:08 am
@farmerman,
And that is precisely where and why I'm in awe of engineers and planners.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 08:19 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

yep. We were on pins and needles since its, as youve stated,
a complex of inteacting structures and giamos that have turned
the potential for another disaster into merely wet feet in Metarie
Its been about 40 years since I heard that expression.
I remember my mother saying: "on pins and needles."
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Oct, 2012 10:10 am
Hurricane Sandy Barrels Northward, May Hit New Jersey
By Brian K. Sullivan and Dan Hart - Oct 28, 2012

Hurricane Sandy grounded 3,200 flights scheduled for today and tomorrow, prompted New York to suspend subway and bus service and forced the evacuation of the New Jersey shore as it headed toward land with life-threatening wind and rain.

The system, which killed as many as 65 people in the Caribbean on its path north, may be capable of inflicting as much as $18 billion in damage when it barrels into New Jersey tomorrow and knock out power to millions for a week or more, according to forecasters and risk experts.

High wind warnings and watches, calling for gusts as strong as 70 miles (113 kilometers) per hour, stretch from Maine to North Carolina and as far west as Ohio, according to the National Weather Service. Flood watches and warnings cover most of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic coasts.

“I hope people realize how bad this can be,” said Tom Kines, a meteorologist with AccuWeather Inc. in State College, Pennsylvania. Even if Sandy loses its hurricane status, “people have to realize that the damage is going to be just as bad whether it is a hurricane or not. If it isn’t a hurricane, they shouldn’t put their guard down.”

Sandy is expected to hook into the U.S. East Coast somewhere in southern New Jersey early Oct. 30, sending a 6- to 10 foot (1.8- to 3-meter) storm surge into the coast as far north as New York City and spreading wind gusts up to 80 miles per hour throughout the Northeast as well, Kines said.

Damage Potential

The potential damage may range from $15 billion to $18 billion, said Charles Watson, director of research and development at Kinetic Analysis Corp., a hazard analysis firm in Silver Spring, Maryland.

“Since Sandy will be hitting during the workweek, there will be much greater secondary effects due to business interruption, power outages,” Watson said in an e-mail interview.

CoreLogic Inc., which tracks real-estate information, said about 284,000 homes in seven U.S. states from Virginia to Massachusetts valued at almost $88 billion are at risk for possible storm surge damage.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo ordered the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to stop running New York City subways, buses and trains at 7 p.m. The transit system is the largest in the U.S., serving 8.5 million riders daily.

Caribbean Path

The system crossed Jamaica Oct. 24 and Cuba on Oct. 25, then tracked north across the central Bahamas. Most of the deaths in the Caribbean were in Haiti, still recovering from a devastating 2010 earthquake, the Associated Press reported.

Sandy is taking its unusual track into the East Coast because a number of weather systems have come together in just the right way, Louis Uccellini, director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, said last week.

Hurricanes don’t really move on their own and depend on other systems to pull or push them on their paths, Kines said.

To Sandy’s east, a phenomenon called the North Atlantic Oscillation is acting like a closed door, barring the storm from moving in that direction. To the west, a cold front and another storm are creating a pattern that will pull Sandy toward them as it evolves into the superstorm some in the Weather Service have dubbed “Frankenstorm.”

Widespread Storm

“There is going to be a lot of rain and wind damage,” Dan Pydynowski, a meteorologist with AccuWeather Inc., said in a telephone interview. “This is going to be a much larger, more widespread storm than Hurricane Irene” last year.

National Guard troops were put on alert in New York and other East Coast states to assist with the storm impact.

“Because of the large size of the system and the slow motion, it’s going to be a long-lasting event, two to three days of impacts for a lot of people,” said James Franklin, branch chief at the hurricane center in Miami. “The kinds of things we are looking at ultimately would be wind damage, widespread power outages, heavy rainfall, inland flooding, and again, somebody is going to get a significant surge event out of this.”

Uccellini said Sandy’s winds will be felt as far from the coast as Ohio and Michigan, and the system could be comparable to 1991’s so-called perfect storm. That nor’easter eventually formed Hurricane Grace, and was chronicled in the best-selling book, “The Perfect Storm,” by Sebastian Junger.

Sandy’s Position

Sandy’s maximum sustained winds remained unchanged at 75 miles (120 kilometers) per hour, the hurricane center said today in an advisory at 11 a.m. New York time. It was centered about 250 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and about 575 miles south of New York, moving northeast at 14 mph.

The storm is expected to have near-hurricane-force winds as it approaches the mid-Atlantic coast tomorrow night, the Miami- based center said.

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie ordered that the state’s barrier islands and casinos in Atlantic City be evacuated by 4 p.m. today. The governor asked residents to pay heed to the warnings and “be prepared for the worst here.”

More than 700 flights were canceled in the U.S. today and 2,500 tomorrow, according to FlightAware, a Houston-based tracking company.

The storm may dump as much as 12 inches of rain on parts of the Northeast, the hurricane center said. The damage will be spread across a wider area than that left by a typical hurricane, the NHC’s Franklin said.

Stores Prepare

Kroger Co. (KR) and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. stocked their shelves with supplies. New York City hardware stores papered windows with signs urging passers-by to be prepared.

Franklin said the storm surge, in which ocean water is pushed ashore, will hit a larger area than Irene. The storm also will be striking two days after the full moon, when tides are at their highest.

“The lunar tides, this is a dangerous period,” Uccellini said. “And with the slow movement of the storm you can go through two or three tidal cycles, which also contributes to the potential impact of this event.”

The National Hurricane Center said water may rise as much as 8 feet (2.4 meters) above ground with the storm surge from Ocean City, Maryland, to the Connecticut/Rhode Island line and 11 feet in Long Island Sound and Raritan Bay.

In a worst-case scenario, New York City may have a 10-foot surge, Kines said.

Uccellini said there is also the potential for at least 12 inches of snow in West Virginia and lesser amounts in Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio.

The hurricane center’s five-day prediction shows the system turning north over Pennsylvania at tropical-storm strength before weakening as it crosses into New York State, over Lake Ontario and into Canada.

Power may be out as long as 10 days in some areas, according to a statement from the Edison Electric Institute, an industry trade group in Washington.
 

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