10
   

Germany has Officially gone Looney Tunes

 
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 08:19 am
@Thomas,
Quote:
In other news, Eurasia has always been at war with Oceania.


And Big Brother is still watching you . . .
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 08:25 am
http://mygermantravels.com/2011/03/german-electricity-prices-at-risk-as-nuclear-shuts-down/


German electricity prices are likely to increase as the government accelerates the shut-down of nuclear power. Citizens chose financial risks over health risks as they watch the Japanese battle a major nuclear reactor crisis. The irony of the new plan is at least four French nuclear reactors reside along the German border. The disaster risks remain. German citizens may end up buying electricity generated by French nuclear power.

Germany pulled-in the targeted date for nuclear reactor shut-down to 2017 from 2022. Chancellor Angela Merkel calls it, “a measured exit.” Seven of the oldest German nuclear reactors are down for safety inspection. To bridge the 23% to 25% nuclear power source of German electricity, the government plans to accelerate wind and solar power while relying on more coal-fired generators and gas power stations.

The chancellery insists the nuclear exit will not increase electricity prices. That promise may go up in smoke:

Remaining German nuclear cores must be reinforced enough to withstand an airliner crashing into the reactor. The millions of Euros to accomplish this end up on taxes or electrical bills;


Fueling German solar power growth is a one billion Euro monthly tax incentive for individuals and companies. This Feed-In Tariff is part of the German Renewal Energy Act, the cost shared by all rate payers. If solar power needs acceleration, the tariff will increase;


Bloomberg reports 26 new German coal-fired electrical plants are in-construction or planning. Utilities expect a return for that investment;


Germany and Russia are developing new natural gas pipelines to feed consumers and gas power stations. INDEX Mundi estimates German natural gas consumption increased 1.63% annually over the last three decades, about the same rate as the country’s GDP. Natural gas pricing is volatile. Germany only generates one-third of its natural gas needs. Russia and other countries control the valve and price.
The Chancellery promises to reduce surplus electricity exports, if shortages develop. A lower European supply of electricity in the face of higher demand will increase prices.

France is not planning to shut-down their nuclear power system which generates 78% of their electricity, according to EnerPub. France will gladly sell Germany excess electricity once the German reactors shut down. The French Cattennom and Fessenheim nuclear power stations are along the Western German border. Deutschland is down-wind from any French nuclear crisis.

Rapidly shutting down the nuclear power program is a rash decision for Germans, who pride themselves on Ordnung – there must be order. Politics and emotion are disrupting planning and order. Nuclear power opposition recently won an election, Baden-Württemberg, which includes Stuttgart and the German auto industry. There goes rashness and order.

Germany will likely reverse the nuclear shut-down decision. A huge investment by the government and business is required to replace German nuclear power. Wind, solar, coal, and gas combined will not meet Germany’s growing needs. The demand for a sizable return on investment, and a potential shortage of electricity, drives up prices. German business growth suffers. France sells expensive electricity to Germans from reactors just west of Deutschland.

When it comes to Germany’s electricity future, Es ist nicht alles klar – it is not all clear



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0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 08:53 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Quote:
In other news, Eurasia has always been at war with Oceania.


And Big Brother is still watching you . . .
In the UK yes, though they are at least considering restraining the practice

Quote:
Provisions in the law, the Protection of Freedoms Bill, include a proposal to limit the powers of councils to monitor people for petty transgressions.

"Millions of householders [will be] protected from town hall snoopers checking their bins or school catchment area," the Home Office said in statement on Friday.

Council powers of surveillance will be limited to investigating crimes that carry a sentence of six months or more, a Home Office spokesman told ZDNet UK on Friday. For example, councils can monitor shops suspected of selling alcohol or cigarettes to underage people, but not for dog-fouling or use of rubbish bins, said the spokesman.

"Snooping on the contents of families' bins and security checking school-run mums are not necessary for public safety, and this bill will bring them to an end," home secretary Theresa May said in the statement. "I am bringing common sense back to public protection and freeing people to go about their daily lives without a fear that the state is monitoring them."

http://www.zdnet.co.uk/news/security/2011/02/11/government-restricts-snooping-surveillance-40091776/
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 09:01 am
@hawkeye10,
At least we don't have The Patriot Act.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 09:02 am
i've never understood why people dislike CCTV or traffic light cams, who gives a ****, if i'm breaking the law i deserve to be caught

so of course the obvious solution would be, don't break the law
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 09:06 am
@djjd62,
Hawkeye is a pain looking for an arse.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 09:09 am
hawkeye, our male housewife with nothing to do but laundry, has again proven that he talks about things he knows nothing of.

Even 25 years ago it resulted in a hefty fine when a certain gesture was used to express ones anger with another driver - it really boils all down to driving on the Autobahn. Germans (and I am one) usually reserve any foul language and gestures for other drivers and given that there is no speed limit on the Autobahn, adrenaline levels are extremely high. If you drive 120 mph in the left lane and
a @$#%$# cuts in front of you, things can get out of hand very fast. Sometimes, we gladly pay the fine, just to utter a "bloede Sau" to someone who dearly deserved it.

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 09:30 am
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:

I am going to have to research on the claimed of 17.3 renewable as that seems very high with today technology to say the least.

Bet someone is doing very creative bookkeeping to come up with that kind of a number.


Well, according to the latest Renewables Global Status Report, GSR, (see HERE
Quote:
Germany has (as average of all suppliers) "Germany met 11% of its total final energy consumption with renewable sources, which accounted for 16.8% of electricity consumption, 9.8% of heat production (mostly from biomass), and 5.8% of transport fuel consumption. Wind power accounted for nearly 36% of renewable generation, followed by biomass, hydropower, and solar photovoltaics (PV).


My local electricity provider has an electricity mix (last month) of 53% fossile energy, 26% from renewable energy and 21% nuclear.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 11:16 am
@djjd62,
Quote:
i've never understood why people dislike CCTV or traffic light cams, who gives a ****, if i'm breaking the law i deserve to be caught
so of course the obvious solution would be, don't break the law


Yes indeed if you are not breaking the law why would you mind if they implant a camera up your ass.

The simple solution is to live in a society somewhere where you have a right for the damn government not to know every move you made.

That society is not the US as they are even now about to pass a law that the ISPs must keep a record for years of everywhere it citizens had gone on the net. The excused being child porn............

Too bad I do not use an ISP account that is in my name or can be trace to me and often used tor on top of that.

Oh the first thing I do with a new computer is to installed whole drive encryption.

There are thousands of laws on the books in the US along with tens of thousands government regulations that had the force of law so no one not even a legal expert can be hundred percent sure at any given time if he or she is not breaking some law or regulation.

With tight monitoring if someone in government wish to find a charge to bring against you, you are in a world of hurt even our pure friend djjd62.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 01:07 pm
@CalamityJane,
Quote:
Sometimes, we gladly pay the fine, just to utter a "bloede Sau" to someone who dearly deserved it.


At the cost of $3580 I doubt your assertion that it is gladly paid.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 01:27 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
At the cost of $3580 I doubt your assertion that it is gladly paid.


To get this sum, you must know
a) how much someone's net earnings is (= all you have per month, excluding taxes, social security, health insurance etc)
b) what the prosecutor (it's mostly done by a ticket) or the judge (if you don't like the sum from the prosecution office) decides as time for the day rate.

For "blöde sau" you get between 10 and 40 day rates, depending on region, how it was done and against whom (you'll get more, if you call a policewoman such) and what your criminal background is.
talk72000
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 01:31 pm
I got hold of Time Magazines biography of Albert Einstein. A German family named Jost Winteler helped lodge the young Einstein.

http://books.google.ca/books?id=dYpwdLWNR2cC&pg=PR5&lpg=PR5&dq=jost+winteler+family&source=bl&ots=BXkcHz9WSA&sig=eH_yz1dR3jeQMrA0tQtXPJEJHF8&hl=en&ei=LqI5TqWDCfPPiAKurvTHDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CDQQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=jost%20winteler%20family&f=false
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 01:37 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
For "blöde sau" you get between 10 and 40 day rates
What is a day rate? And is Calamity right that this has been going on for a long time? During the years I lived in Germany I never heard of this, are US military exempt?
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 01:40 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

During the years I lived in Germany I never heard of this, are US military exempt?


No it's just everytime you came along, the police pissed themselves laughing.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 02:06 pm
@hawkeye10,
Fines inGermany are based on daily units (dictionaries translate it with "day rates"): e.g. either you go to prison for 30 days or you pay 30 daily units. Each unit depends on your income: the rich pay more, the poor less.

That is used here since 1975, when our criminal code was chanced.

The so-called Strafbefehl ("penal order"), which is usually done by the prosecution office, was known the old Criminal Code (pre-1974) as well
hawkeye10
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 02:09 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
Fines inGermany are based on daily units (dictionaries translate it with "day rates"): e.g. either you go to prison for 30 days or you pay 30 daily units. Each unit depends on your income: the rich pay more, the poor less.
and what is your daily unit, or if your prefer what would be a typical middle class daily unit?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 02:11 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
During the years I lived in Germany I never heard of this, are US military exempt?


Yes, according to the NATO Status of Forces Agreement.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 02:13 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

and what is your daily unit, or if your prefer what would be a typical middle class daily unit?


About a glass and a half of chardonnay.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 02:17 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
and what is your daily unit, or if your prefer what would be a typical middle class daily unit?


As said: that depends on what your monthly income is reduced by taxes, health insurance and social insurances.

There isn't any "typical middle class daily unit"

From the German Criminal Code
Quote:
Section 40

Day fine units

(1) A fine shall be imposed in daily units. The minimum fine shall consist of five and, unless the law provides otherwise, the maximum shall consist of three hundred and sixty full daily units.

(2) The court shall determine the amount of the daily unit taking into consideration the personal and financial circumstances of the offender. In doing so, it shall typically base its calculation on the actual average one-day net income of the offender or the average income he could achieve in one day. A daily unit shall not be set at less than one and not at more than thirty thousand euros.

(3) The income of the offender, his assets and other relevant assessment factors may be estimated when setting the amount of a daily unit.

(4) The number and amount of the daily units shall be indicated in the decision.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2011 02:21 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Jurisdictions employing the day-fine are among others Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Norway (it is actually a "Scandinavian invention"), Croatia, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Mexico, and Macao.
0 Replies
 
 

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