10
   

Germany has Officially gone Looney Tunes

 
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Apr, 2013 12:41 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:
Perhaps instead you can look at my posting instead to see that it was not a statement of fact but a sarcastic question instead!!!!!!!!!!!!


So when you get something wrong, you're being sarcastic?

Do you really expect people to believe that?

0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Tue 2 Apr, 2013 12:45 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:

The below just prove that nothing is ever simple however France is a net exporter of electric power on a very large scale using imports for short time periods of high demands instead of building more peak demand generators themselves
You didn't read the official French statements and the brochure, I suppose.

Nevertheless, I don't doubt that France is still the largest electricity exporter in Europe.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Apr, 2013 02:51 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
As the largest export of electric in the EU they could more then likely provide the power infrastructure on a cheap base to any business that had problems with the German grid and wish to move due to those problems.

That was the start of my comments when the question came up in a posting of another poster as to where would such businesses could relocated up north?

And my come back to that direct post was were is France north of Germany? Meaning that they could move to France to solve that problem not that France is north of Germany.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Apr, 2013 03:24 pm
@BillRM,
BillRM wrote:
And my come back to that direct post was were is France north of Germany? Meaning that they could move to France to solve that problem not that France is north of Germany.


Bollocks!

Now BillRM, this is what someone who's not as thick as mince would do; they'd admit they were wrong, blame it on a typo or a lack of concentration. Let's face it, we've all done it, you just end up looking a bit silly.

That boat has long set sail, and now you look like a complete and utter dickhead.

First of all you tried to claim you were being sarcastic. Now, we're supposed to believe you meant something else entirely. Nuances of language, allegory and metaphor are not things you can even spell, let alone master.



0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Apr, 2013 04:00 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Export-Import of electricity from our "northern" neighbour country (source: see above)


I'm still cracking up over France being north of Germany.

hamburgboy apparently always drove the wrong direction from Schiphol to get to Hamburg.
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Apr, 2013 04:11 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
I'm still cracking up over France being north of Germany.

hamburgboy apparently always drove the wrong direction from Schiphol to get to Hamburg.



Well the German army have a history of going indirectly to get to France in two world wars at least........... Drunk
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 03:38 pm
while I am sometimes wrong it is too early to say I was wrong here

Quote:
Aug 15 (Reuters) - Norwegian utility Statkraft said on Thursday it had idled two gas-fired power plants in Germany that were incurring losses, after German utilities also announced similar closures this week.

E.ON and RWE said they would idle or shut thousands of megawatts of conventional gas and coal power capacity due to falling wholesale electricity prices and a surge in subsidized renewable power.

"Short-term power prices have continued to fall (in Germany), worsening the margin between power and gas prices," Yngve Froeshaug, Statkraft's vice-president for investor relations, told a conference call.

"Due to this, our gas power plants in Knapsack and Herdecke for the time being are out of production - that is in the wet reserve," he added.

"Wet reserve" means the plants could be restarted in a relatively short time in case market conditions change, he said.

Both plants were commissioned in 2007 and have a combined installed capacity of 1,200 MW. Statkraft co-owns Herdecke plant with Mark-E.

Statkraft shut its older, less efficient 510 MW Robert Frank gas-fired power plant near Dusseldorf earlier this year and a 450 MW power plant in Emden last year, just three years after taking them over as a part of asset swap with E.ON.

The state-owned company took a 2 billion Norwegian crown ($340 million) impairment charge on its German gas power plants in 2012.

"It's hard to comment on what will happen in the future, but looking at the total gas portfolio in our balance sheet, it's a fairly small part," Statkraft Chief Financial Officer Jens Bjoern Staff told the conference call, when asked about further impairements on the German assets.

Out of its total installed generating capacity of over 17,000 MW, gas-fired assets including the mothballed units account for just over 2,000 MW.

While wholesale prices in Germany slid by 20 percent during the first half of this year, prices in Statkraft's core Nordic market rose by over 20 percent. ($1 = 5.8827 Norwegian krones) (Reporting by Nerijus Adomaitis; editing by Jane Baird)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/15/statkraft-germany-idUSL6N0GG1M620130815?feedType=RSS&feedName=utilitiesSector&rpc=43

I suspect that what has happened is that the deep recession in all areas of Europe not Germany has resulted in power being cheap to import into Germany, that the low power prices are actually a sign of trouble. France in particular is a basket case so their massive nuclear generation capacity is likely being sold to germany cheap.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 04:01 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:
I suspect that what has happened is that the deep recession in all areas of Europe not Germany has resulted in power being cheap to import into Germany, that the low power prices are actually a sign of trouble. France in particular is a basket case so their massive nuclear generation capacity is likely being sold to germany cheap.
Did you perhaps follow the weather in Europe? Do you have ANY idea, how much electricity Germany imports and exports?

(Hint: sun, solar panels; wind, wind turbines.)
Second hint: from January until May Germany imported 16.74 billion kWh - but exported 30.79 billion kWh.
Third hint: We exported in the first six months of this year more electricty to France than we got from there.)
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 04:05 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Do you have ANY idea?


The rest of the sentence is redundant, and the answer is no.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  2  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 04:21 pm
Germany may be looney--they were once much worse than that--but they are now redeemed by being the home of Walter Hinteler and the world's best beer and classical music. And they shouldn't even use Starbuck coffee for enemas.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Aug, 2013 04:23 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
my main argument was that nuke free germany sticks a knife into German industry, thus is a stupid move. we have yet to see that I was wrong.

Quote:
However, the industry association for large corporate and industrial users in Germany, VIK has said that the rise of power exports in Germany was a sign that the country's energy switchover has not been a success. Their industry association stressed that wind and solar utilities frequently generated electricity when there was no immediate demand and that eco-friendly power was pushing gas-driven plants out of the market, although these were still needed when the wind wasn't blowing or the sun wasn't shining.

http://www.neurope.eu/article/power-exports-peak-germany

I was wrong about where German electric rates would be right now, at least wholesale. I believe that the retail rates are still very high to pay for green energy production. however cheap wholesale rates do not help german industry if they can not depend upon the supply, and it is not clear to me that a non recessionary France can be depended upon to supply.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Mar, 2014 12:38 pm
Germany Is Running Out of Energy Options

By Joshua Keating

Quote:
Germany, Europe’s largest energy consumer—and the world’s seventh-largest—seems to be running out of politically feasible sources of power.

At a summit last week, EU leaders pledged to reduce their reliance on Russia for energy supplies. This isn’t an immediate crisis: No matter how tense things get, Russia isn’t likely to eliminate 14 percent of its export earnings by cutting off Europe’s energy supply. If Moscow decides to punish Ukraine by withholding gas supplies or raising prices, there are now alternate supply routes for getting the gas to Western Europe. And thanks to a milder-than-normal winter, gas reserves are currently high.

But in the long term, countries like Germany would likely feel in a better position to deal with Russia if they weren’t dependent on it for one-third of their oil and natural gas. Unfortunately, none of the country’s other options looks that great either.

Germany is one of the few countries in the world that seems to be sticking with its post-Fukushima pledge to wean itself off of nuclear energy. It plans to have all of its nine remaining nuclear plants offline by 2022.

Germany is also in the midst of a push, known as the Energiewende, to have all of its energy supplied by renewable sources by 2050. Unfortunately for that goal, the country’s once-booming solar energy industry has essentially collapsed over the last three years thanks to falling state subsidies and competition from cheaper Asian rivals. The EU has also opened an investigation into the country’s green energy subsidies, and a parliamentary commission recently recommended scrapping them entirely amid concerns about efficiency.

Despite Angela Merkel’s government’s focus on green energy, the country’s coal use actually hit its highest level since 1990 last year. With no conventionally extractable natural gas on its own, some are also recommending that the government consider hydraulic fracturing in Germany, which the government currently opposes on environmental grounds.

All of Merkel’s government's goals—shifting to renewable energy, weaning the country off Russian gas, reducing the risk of nuclear accidents—have been admirable, but doing them all at once raises some questions about how exactly the country plans to keep the lights on in the medium-to-long term.


http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2014/03/24/no_nukes_no_russian_gas_no_fossils_no_solar_no_fracking_how_exactly_does.html
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 12:44 am
http://m.c.lnkd.licdn.com/mpr/mpr/p/4/005/04e/132/226d043.jpg

morons
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 01:14 am
@hawkeye10,
http://images.realclear.com/257522_5_.jpg

Read: competitive disadvantage. And they did it to themselves.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 01:46 am
@hawkeye10,
One aspect you don't seem to be grasping in all of this is the fact that energy, especially fossil fuel energy, is being targeted for higher tax specifically to focus the mind on cleaner, greener energy in the future.

With your 1950's American mind, all you see is cheap price advantage, and you turn your brain off when reports are on TV about vast blankets of man made smog in cities around the world. Think Los Angeles, even on a good day.

Luckily for the rest of us in the world, who have to breathe your crap, a big meet was held between China and the USA recently, specifically to look at this global problem.

If they are actually serious this time, your little panties will be getting in a severe twist in the not too distant future, when you see similar "incentives" coming your way to ease up on the usage of fossil fuels.

I can sort of see where you are coming from regarding Germany, because I can't see their logic for pulling out of Nuclear. They have possibly the best designers and engineers in the world, so if anyone can build a safe Nuclear plant, it will be the Germans. To pull out altogether because of the damage caused to a very badly positioned power station in Japan and that tsunami, left me scratching my head.
At the time, Putin was a reasonably good boy and Germany could afford to think lazy because of the massive cheap gas import from Russia, but now Putin has thrown his toys out of the pram, Germany needs to find other ways to import or create energy, and fast.

Britain led the world in the field of Nuclear energy power soon after ww2, but successive governments here have left it on the back burner for years and we no longer have the expertise.
We have seen the writing on the wall though, and the French experts are being drafted in to get some new plants built over the coming decade or so.


But this is not entirely about price advantage or industrial output, point scoring with exports or putting industry first at any cost.
To post your triumphs here regarding business and industry, you demonstrate either an ignorance or a willful refusal to see what affect fossil fuels are having around the world.
As long as it doesn't affect your little corner of hicksvilke, you are happy to let your country take a dump every day on the rest of us.

Germany will find a way around their problem, and will continue to be major world players with their goods. Have you ever tried comparing a German car, fridge, washing machine, cooker, freezer etc to an American one?
They're not going broke any time soon, I assure you.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 01:57 am
@Lordyaswas,
Quote:
Christoph Schmidt, chairman of the council of economic experts that advises the government, suggests that “the black zero should not be a fetish”. Germany’s municipal governments, not the federal one, should be the ones to raise public investment. But the bigger problem, he thinks, is that private investment is too low. In a free-market economy such as Germany’s, the government cannot command firms to invest more at home than abroad. If businesses have chosen another course, he says, it must be because, for whatever reasons, they find Germany an unrewarding place for investment

http://www.economist.com/news/europe/21633832-germanys-economy-getting-too-weak-pull-europe-out-its-crisis-sputtering-engine?zid=295&ah=0bca374e65f2354d553956ea65f756e0
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 02:08 am
@Lordyaswas,
Quote:
One aspect you don't seem to be grasping in all of this is the fact that energy, especially fossil fuel energy, is being targeted for higher tax specifically to focus the mind on cleaner, greener energy in the future.


The rest of the world full throatily cheers the Germans on in their task at making clean air for the planet. Have at it, in fact do more, spend more on all of your clean air programs so that you drive your industry into the ground so that you have to buy from us.

A country that makes almost all of their money by making **** and selling it around the globe kills off the golden goose because they got scared of Nuclear energy after watching the Japanese **** it up........ARE YOU KIDDING ME! Has anyone in the last 30 years noticed what a mess Japan is? There was the expectation that German systems could be expected to perform at the low Japanese levels, based upon what?

The Germans lost their nerve. And they will pay the price.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 02:18 am
@hawkeye10,
And by that post, you epitomise the American stereotype around the world.

This is not fair on the majority of people in your country who actually have a reasoning brain, but hey ho, that's how a typical American is viewed.

And you probably don't care a jot about that.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 02:22 am
Germany got rid of the nuclear plants. Now, they are mining and burning brown coal. I'm not sure it is a good trade off.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Dec, 2014 02:29 am
@roger,
As I said, that left me scratching my head as well.

But at the time it was a lazy, possibly vote catching option. Their people would possibly cheer their government for being so brave and green, in the immediate aftermath of the Japanese tragedy,

After all, they had a bountiful, cheap supply of Russisn gas at the time and Putin was happily playing footsie with Merkel.

In hindsight, I would guess that they now wished they had kept quiet on the Nuclear issue, as to do a U turn now will be the cause of great embarrassment.
You are right though. They would now seemingly prefer to go back to coal for the moment. Hopefully it's a stop gap.

0 Replies
 
 

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