chai2
 
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 02:39 pm
Has anyone used them?
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 2,359 • Replies: 25

 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 03:48 pm
@chai2,
Is this what is also called trekking poles? If so, I got to try out a pair on a steep trail in the Rockies. They were fabulous, and the steeper the trail and the heavier the load, the better they get.
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  2  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 03:59 pm
@chai2,
Yes. V.good.
Remember left hand goes with right foot and vice versa.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:08 pm
@fresco,
I didn't remember that, but it is completely different than using a single hiking staff.
fresco
 
  3  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:21 pm
@roger,
That's right. Unlike a single pole, the opposite hand-foot combination ensures two point L-R stable contact at all times.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:23 pm
@fresco,
Interesting.

I wonder if that could be used therapeutically; if not to obviate the usual walker thing, maybe in some situations it would be handy for the elderly infirm.
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:33 pm
@ossobuco,
Perhaps...though it might be a problem for arthritic arm/hand joints.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:34 pm
Are there single Nordic walking poles that collapses?
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:35 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
Nordic walking poles

No, I haven't used them. I'm wondering though, what's the point of using them while walking in the city? I've seen this a few times now in my city.
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:41 pm
@cicerone imposter,
All the ones I've seen are light -weight and adjustable down to about 70 cm. They easily fit in suitcases.
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 04:42 pm
@Reyn,
Even walking on the flat you tend to push yourself along at a fair speed.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 05:58 pm
@fresco,
That's what I'm looking for. I'll visit some sports stores tomorrow morning. My airport shuttle doesn't pick me up until noon.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 08:21 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Be sure to pack them in checked luggage.

I haven't seen them used much on pavement; more on unpaved trails. Some have carbide points for traction on rocks. Noisy on pavement without the rubber tips, and I would make sure such tips have available replacements. I doubt the last long.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 08:33 pm
@roger,
and if you are going to use them in the city, I would also suggest a leather bomber helmet and goggles. mebbe a scarf.

so folks will know for sure that you are not quite right...
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 08:44 pm
@Rockhead,
you see a fair number of people in the city here, using them to exercise - not that unusual after the first couple of sightings
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 08:47 pm
@ehBeth,
but you're in Canada...

(you guys put the nord in nordic.)
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 09:10 pm
@Rockhead,
Isn't nord north>>}?
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 06:37 am
wow, lot's of posts.
Thanks all for questions and opinions.

ci - I actually thought about you when the idea of these popped into my head. I figured a world traveler such as you would have used them. From what I have seen, I think you'd really like them.

osso - yes, I had the same idea. Sometimes the only thing that is needed from stumbling/losing balance is just a slight bit of support. Not saying the poles can't and don't offer more support, but you know how sometimes you just need to reach out and touch something to regain balance.

I stopped by an REI store yesterday, and was looking at them. I got a really helpful salesperson, who really knew his stuff. I won't bore you with the details, but I can see how this is an improvement on nature, where you would just pick up one or two sticks/branches from the ground.

The weather is starting to cool down, and I'm anxious to go down on the greenbelt for some good walks on the weekend.
2 winters before, I took a fall out there, it was a bit of a wakeup call to me. Was on the nice wide path, just tripped on a rock sticking no more than an inch or two out of the ground. Took no more than that to set off an unfortunate chain of events. When I say "fall" that means fall, hit left breast square on, full weight on a log, bouncing off and hitting head, bouncing off and rolling down off the trail while thinking "don't pass out, don't pass out" experience various other twists and turns during a brief tumble/slide thinking "oh christ, I'm going to end up in the water, don't pass out" and finally coming to rest somewhat on my back, jammed between the crook of some tree. Took me several minutes to extricate from the situation, and still had to walk another 45 minutes to get to my car.

Back to the walking poles.

At the REI store, I adjusted two of the poles to my height, and tried them out, as much as one can in a store. I mean walking up an aisle a few times, getting feel of them.

My first thought was that I was really getting a good stretch and turn in my hips. One that would have been hard to acheive walking without the pole. Not impossible, but with every step you would have to be conscious of shifting weight properly, rotation, etc. I could tell, after a couple of passes, that it was accessing the psoas muscles, notoriously hard to get to, and the cause of many back and hip issues.
I could also tell it was taking weight off the knees. Obviously since you are employing the upper body, it's also take weight off other joints; ankles, hips.

When the weather becomes cool, during the week I like to get outside when I first get up, when it's still dark. Poles are also a protection possibility against dogs, both 4 and 2 legged. Ditto for when on the greenbelt on the weekends.

There's various pole tips for various surfaces, including asphalt. The guy at the store showed me which ones he liked for all around walking.

I'm intrigued.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 07:04 am
Good info, it is intriguing. Also glad re the various pole tips.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 10:04 am
Lots of people were using them in Germany when i was there. It seemed to me they would assist in working the upper body as well as arms.
I can see their value.
0 Replies
 
 

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