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Please List Euphemisms for Unflattering Phenomena Related to the Female Body

 
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 09:49 pm
apple versus pear
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 10:22 pm
Endomoprh
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 10:25 pm
@dyslexia,
was that gender specific? Not when I learned about it.
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 10:53 pm
Muffin top.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 11:00 pm
@Robert Gentel,
In the original post..
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 11:07 pm
@ossobuco,
How quickly I forget...
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 11:12 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:

was that gender specific? Not when I learned about it.


I so wish I could throw in stuff like "brickie's cleavage" and "beer belly".


I think "awning over the toy-shop" works for women's big tummies as well as men's.


Statuesque

Rubenesque

I wonder if "Amazonian" would work for women with one breast a lot smaller than the other?

I have an Amazonian friend, after lumpectomy.

It's really pronounced, and causes her back problems.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 11:12 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Me too. I'm thinking specifically female worryworting and not being swift at it.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 11:15 pm
@dlowan,
I suppose there are boob specific complaints..
I had a friend with gracious boobs. Big problem figuring out who might actually like her.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 11:24 pm
@dlowan,
Oy, noddy and I talked about this to each other. I didn't know about it, she was clueing me in, but apparently breast surgery size changes can be complicated.
I had two surgeries and one is, uh, shorter.

Bless noddy -

But, Garg was wanting to know about young women. Some young women do have bc surgery, and some have cosmetic surgeries of different sorts.

I remember a quip by a surgeon friend, re headlights being off beam.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Feb, 2010 11:40 pm
@ossobuco,
But, would that make it into fashion press, probably not.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 01:42 am
@ossobuco,
And some young women just have breasts of really different sizes naturally.

Like feet.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 01:47 am
@dlowan,
Well, breasts seem to be idealized..
0 Replies
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 01:54 am
I like marionette lines...
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 06:31 am
Are you teaching the wrong lesson here?

If the claim is that women are singled out for unflattering Euphemisms, I think this is untrue. I would say there is a equivalent number of unflattering euphemisms for male traits-- and I hope any education would include both.

The Euphemisms for men include:

- Bear Gut
- Butt Crack (particularly the stereotypical overweight working guy-- plumber)
- Comb-over
- Pencil neck

I would rather have kids taught about unflattering stereotypes in general.

It is a myth that this is a gender issue.
Gargamel
 
  3  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 09:33 am
@ebrown p,
The lesson I'm teaching, I think, is spot on, but I've provided zero context for it, so really it would be impossible for anyone here to say. I mean, the subject of this thread is tangential to the subject of my project.

But in response to the general drift of your post, I would ask you to pick up any one of the 7,392 women's fashion magazines available at your nearest drug store. Every other page is an ad for a cosmetic product. Every other article is about getting in shape for the summer, or dos and don'ts for satisfying men sexually and in other ways, for example I flipped through an issue of Glamour yesterday and saw an aside urging women to take an interest in football, not for their own satisfaction, but to increase their appeal to the opposite sex.

But I think my argument is best summed up by Spanks: http://www.spanx.com/home/index.jsp Yes, many men have beer guts, but exactly none of them feel compelled to stuff them inside 21st Century corsets for weddings and cocktail parties.
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 09:44 am
@Gargamel,
Quote:
I flipped through an issue of Glamour yesterday and saw an aside urging women to take an interest in football, not for their own satisfaction, but to increase their appeal to the opposite sex.


How is this different than Men's Health, or Maxim (magazines that have the exact same types of advice for men)? This is not to mention the amount of spam suggesting that I need to increase the size of a certain part of my body.

Quote:
Yes, many men have beer guts, but exactly none of them feel compelled to stuff them inside 21st Century corsets for weddings and cocktail parties.


There is an awful lot of pressure on men for gym memberships and funky workout machines-- not to mention "herbal supplements" that are foisted on us. Then there is the hair transplant, minoxidil thing.

I don't think women have it any worse then men when it comes to pressures about body image.

The one exception I will make is the women weight thing which leads to particularly unhealthy behavior. But to generalize this, and to minimize the equivalent pressures on men, is misleading and unwarranted.

DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 09:50 am
@ebrown p,
ebrown p wrote:
I don't think women have it any worse then men when it comes to pressures about body image.

I think you're sadly deluded.
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 09:59 am
@DrewDad,
Would you like to back up your position with evidence, DrewDad?

I know as a father of teenaged boys, and as former high school teacher, the boys who don't fit the idea of masculinity face a good deal of pressure. Body image has a lot to do with this.. boys who are obese, particularly those who are obese without a "tough" image, are under quite a bit of pressure.

All of the evidence given so far (e.g. magazines) has equivalent male counterparts
I have already stated list a large number of equally unflattering euphemisms for the male body.

There are real negative effects of pressure on boys dealing with body image-- the tragedy of steroid use in high school boys for example.

It is a powerful narrative that society is especially unfair to women-- but in this case, at least, it is not backed up by evidence.

The fact that these anti-male stereotypes aren't taken seriously makes them all the more harmful.

DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 10:03 am
@ebrown p,
When there's an entire industry devoted to creating paints for men to apply to their faces, I might come around to your way of thinking.

I'm not saying that there isn't pressure on men to behave or look a certain way, but there are a lot more messages directed at women.
0 Replies
 
 

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