34
   

"Just Because He's Black"

 
 
H2O MAN
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 09:04 am
@Steve 41oo,


Americans has elected thoroughly decent guys before and they will again.
0 Replies
 
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 09:10 am
@Intrepid,
Intrepid wrote:

Brandon9000 wrote:

Intrepid wrote:

Brandon9000 wrote:

"We" didn't come together to vote for him. Almost half of "we" voted against him.


Sorry for your luck

Don't be, it's democracy. My intention was to point out the ludicrous assumption implicit in the quotation that everyone is happy about today. Almost half of the country isn't.


What about articles like http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/01/18/poll.obama.rating/index.html

None of the poll results make it true that:

"WE, came together and voted for him"

because almost half of the people who voted voted against him.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 09:19 am
@Brandon9000,
Or voted FOR McCain. This election was marked by an unusual amount of goodwill towards both candidates -- less voting against than usual, more voting for.

Which is what makes the approval ratings pertinent -- there are a lot of people like Phoenix who didn't vote for Obama but who are now part of the "we" that have come together to support him.

And it's still noteworthy that enough people voted for Obama that he's actually less than two hours away from becoming president. That's something that would have been unthinkable in the not-too-distant past.
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 09:53 am
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:

Or voted FOR McCain. This election was marked by an unusual amount of goodwill towards both candidates -- less voting against than usual, more voting for.

Which is what makes the approval ratings pertinent -- there are a lot of people like Phoenix who didn't vote for Obama but who are now part of the "we" that have come together to support him.

And it's still noteworthy that enough people voted for Obama that he's actually less than two hours away from becoming president. That's something that would have been unthinkable in the not-too-distant past.

Yes, and I will try to support him because he won the election. But this, "we came together to elect him," born in a manger stuff is ludicrous.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 09:57 am
@Brandon9000,
"Born in a manger" stuff is ridiculous, sure. Did anyone here say that though?

I do think it says something good about America that enough people came together to elect him. Littlek was one of 'em, so she's justified in saying "we."
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 10:01 am
@Brandon9000,
Brandon9000 wrote:
My intention was to point out the ludicrous assumption implicit in the quotation that everyone is happy about today. Almost half of the country isn't.

Brandon, did you see this from Phoenix above your post?

Phoenix32890 wrote:

I did not vote for Obama. Saying that, I am very pleased that he is going to be our new president.

'Ccording to the polls, there's a lot of McCain-voters like Phoenix out there. People who voted for the other guy but are nevertheless pleased to see Obama inaugurated and have a positive impression of him. Seems like you need to revisit your assumption here.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 11:50 am
I feel similar to Phoenix (voted for McCain, but do not dislike Obama and can see his positive sides).

I think some people voted for him simply because he is black and other people voted against him simply because he is black. However, (maybe I’m optimistic or just tend to think well of the majority) " I think most people voted without much consideration of race. It would be different if he was unqualified and was elected simply because of his color.

That being said, I can see both sides. I also don’t like the fact of making this a black issue one way or the other. But it is history to have the first black president. It is a wonderful thing to realize our country overall does not consider race when making such decisions! Isn’t that fantastic!

I look at my daughters and think " it will be better for them at least in this regard. I know they have a different imagine about race than I did growing up and I hope it stays this way. Not being a big deal to them that the president is black. It is about as big a deal he has brown eyes. We saw Hotel for Dogs the other day. In the end, the two white children ended up getting adopted by a black couple. My daughters never questioned or acted like it was anything than a couple adopting children that needed parents. Color never even entered their thoughts. Isn’t that wonderful?
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:13 pm
@Linkat,
All I can think of is how great it is that there is a black man as president, I didn't vote for him, but that is because I am conservative. He and his family seem to be wonderful. All I can hope for is that he makes wise decisions while he is there, he and all the other men and women that are a part of this democratic process we are so fortunate to live in. There is always hope. I am full of hope.
Woiyo9
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:19 pm
@mismi,
Why does "race" matter to you?
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:22 pm
@mismi,
I agree exactly!
0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:29 pm
@Woiyo9,
Race does not matter...but in this case I do believe that it is a sign that we are getting closer to having a country that makes decisions not based on race but on issues. Once again...that is my hope.
Woiyo9
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:32 pm
@mismi,
So in this case, race matters to you.

You ignore all the other great accomplishments of other black Americans as insignificant but focus only on this election to make you less of a racist today than you were yesterday?

Yep, we still have issues.
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:33 pm
@nimh,
nimh wrote:

Brandon9000 wrote:
My intention was to point out the ludicrous assumption implicit in the quotation that everyone is happy about today. Almost half of the country isn't.

Brandon, did you see this from Phoenix above your post?

Phoenix32890 wrote:

I did not vote for Obama. Saying that, I am very pleased that he is going to be our new president.

'Ccording to the polls, there's a lot of McCain-voters like Phoenix out there. People who voted for the other guy but are nevertheless pleased to see Obama inaugurated and have a positive impression of him. Seems like you need to revisit your assumption here.

I assume that many of the people who voted for McCain wish that he had been elected. Any other assumption would be foolish. Everyone hasn't secretly realized that you were right all along, and quietly modified their views to concur with yours.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:42 pm
@Brandon9000,
I think what she is saying is that people are pleased - this is not the same as they would not have preferred one candidate over the other. Maybe they are pleased with the race side of things - pleased that Obama seems an intelligent man, level headed or whatever. It doesn't mean that they prefer Obama.
0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:42 pm
@Woiyo9,
Quote:
You ignore all the other great accomplishments of other black Americans as insignificant but focus only on this election to make you less of a racist today than you were yesterday?


You got all of that out of my post? Impressive.
Green Witch
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:58 pm
Obama is not the first black man to run for president. Jesse Jackson made a serious run for the office in the late 80's. I went to one of Jackson's rallies in NYC and he had a large following of people willing to give him a chance. However, he came across as a man with more ego than intelligence. At the end of the rally, even black supports were whispering they wished he had more charisma and a better message. Jackson eventually imploded with his "Hymietown" remarks, but even if that hadn't happened I can't imagine anyone - liberal, white, black or otherwise - putting him in the same category as Obama. Americans voted for Obama because they believe he is the best person for the job. The fact that so many Americans were able to overlook his skin color is the real surprise.
Woiyo9
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 12:59 pm
@mismi,
Apparently, you do not understand that words have meaning.

You have issues. Rolling Eyes
Rockhead
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 01:00 pm
@Woiyo9,
Pick out the weakest one, and attack Woiya...

YOU have issues.

(been a while since you had one you thought you could get at?)

Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 01:03 pm
@djjd62,
djjd62 wrote:

i'm not sure what i feel about the whole black angle, i firmly believe that of the two candidates he ran the best campaign and represented himself as the best choice


I think that in the general election that is why he was elected (based solely on his positions, merits, campaign) when running against McCain.

During the primary however, when positions and merits were pretty much equal between the candidates, I think his race was VERY MUCH the reason he was elected. But we've discussed that quite often already.
H2O MAN
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 20 Jan, 2009 01:14 pm
@maporsche,
maporsche wrote:



During the primary however, when positions and merits were pretty much equal between the candidates, I think his race was VERY MUCH the reason he was elected.


The studies have been done and most voted for O boy because they were
sure he was black, even though he is the one pictured in the middle.

http://images-cdn01.associatedcontent.com/image/A1144/114469/300_114469.jpg
 

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