7
   

I'm in a pickle

 
 
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 08:40 am
First time pickler here. I did my research.
I am asking my fellow able2knowers to share any hints, tips, secret ingredients, passed down recipes, anything... anything that might make my pickling taste better.
I'm pickling cukes(cucumbers) and something my grandma pickled. She pickled carrots,parsley, hungarian peppers, and a couple other ingredients, in one jar.
For canning and preserving, most recipes call for boiling canned contents. Won't that soften up the pickles and other canned ingredients? I read somewhere that putting a grape leaf on the bottom of each jar helps with crispiness.
As an experiment, I cut one cuke up, and did a cold pickle recipe:
Mixed three parts vinegar, one part water with a dill pickling mix. Boiled. Put garlic, quartered cuke, and pickling liquid in jar and refrigerated.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.
 
dagmaraka
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 09:31 am
@alex240101,
We add horseradish sometimes, and/or dill.
alex240101
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 09:49 am
@dagmaraka,
Thank you dagmaraka.
List started.
Horseradish root.

I have twenty three jars left.
JPB
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 10:37 am
@alex240101,
My mother made dilly-beans (dilled green beans). I don't recall whether or not she boiled them first or as part of the processing, but they were delicious.
mismi
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 10:45 am
@JPB,
This is really the only way I can pickle. I know you are doing it the better way Alex. They are NOT that crispy - but yum anyway.


Refrigerator Pickles

8 cups cucumbers, ends cut, thinly sliced. Do not peel
1 1/2 cup thinly sliced onion
1/2 cup thinly sliced green pepper


2 cups white vinegar
2 cups sugar
1 tbsp salt ( I do use a very coarse kosher salt for this)
1 tbsp celery seed
1 1/2 tsp mustard seed

In large bowl, place cucumber, onion and pepper.

Place vinegar, sugar, salt, celery seed and mustard seed in pot. Heat to a boil, stirring often. Boil for three minutes.

Pour over the cucumber mixture. Cool. Put in clean jars, refrigerate and let sit for 3 to 4 days. They will keep in the refrigerator for 2 months.

My boys love them. It is not that traditional...but it is easy - I NEED easy.
alex240101
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 12:23 pm
add to list: fresh green beans, mustard seed.
JPB. Your mentioning of green beans jarred my memory a bit. My grandma use to put another long, thin vegetable in the jar. I can not remember what it was. She also put something we kids referred to as seaweed.(long, green, stringy. Probally some herb..maybe)
Mismi. If the grape leaf ingredient idea makes the cukes crispier, I will inform you.
Thank you guys....girls. Twenty one jars left.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 12:41 pm
@mismi,
Alex, my recipe is much like Missy's, but no green pepper, more onion, and add tumeric.

These can be done in th microwave as well (cheater pickles)
mismi
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 12:46 pm
@Rockhead,
cheater pickles Laughing
alex240101
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 01:16 pm
I'm going to keep responding, firstly, because you ladies are awesome. Secondly, I need to keep putting this thread, at the top, to get exposure.
Tumeric.
I vaguely remember a round (resembled a whole white peppercorn) object floating in my grandmas jars.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  3  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 01:18 pm
I haven't done pickling for a while but one of the ways I've done it -- really cheating -- is to grab the juice from commercial pickles that I've liked and used that (you really can only use it once; then it gets funky). Also trying to recreate it. Currently I'm trying to watch salt but I suspect no salt at all isn't the way to go, either. Hmm. Maybe overly hot (e. g. red pepper flakes or the like) would be another way to go?
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 01:26 pm
@jespah,
I need to do some reading on that thread Jespah. That sounds like something I could do. Thanks.
0 Replies
 
Izzie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 01:33 pm
@mismi,
cheater pickles............... to online picklers...

k - I don't pickle but I need to feel useful here so I pickled online....

so....

I read...
"Many old-fashioned pickle recipes call for grape leaves. Grape leaves contain tannins that contribute a bitter flavor to pickles and possibly inhibit enzymes that soften cucumbers."

Crisp Tips for Fresh Preserved Cucumber Pickles
Everything’s better with a little crunch! On the side or on your favorite sandwiches, homemade fresh preserved pickles are easy to make in your own kitchen with Ball®Simple Creations®Pickle Crisp®Powder. • Follow a current, tested preserving recipe.• Be sure to use cucumbers suitable for pickling, such as Kirbys, that are no greater than 6 inches in length. Other cucumber varieties may be good choices for relishes or chutneys.• Fresh, firm, high-quality cucumbers, with no signs of spoiling, should be used within 24 hours of their harvest for the best pickles. After harvest or purchase, refrigerate pickling cucumbers until use to keep them from deteriorating.• Wash pickling cucumbers before using. Soil can contain bacteria that cause softening in pickles.• Remove the stem end of pickling cucumbers"it contains enzymes that can cause soft pickles.


OR

How to Keep Pickles Crisp



If good quality ingredients are used in pickling and up-to-date methods are followed, lime and alum are not needed for crisp pickles. Use the following tips:

Soak cucumbers in ice water for 4 - 5 hours prior to pickling.
Alum may be safely used to firm fermented pickles. Alum does not improve the firmness of quick - process pickles.
The calcium in lime may improve pickle firmness. If you choose to use lime, purchase food-grade pickling lime, DO NOT USE AGRICULTURAL OR BURNT LIME. Food-grade lime may be used as lime-water solution for soaking fresh cucumbers 12 to 24 hours before pickling them. Excess lime absorbed by the cucumbers must be removed to make safe pickles. To remove excess lime, drain the lime-water solution, rinse, and then resoak the cucumbers in fresh water for 1 hour. Repeat the rinsing and soaking steps two more times.





Making Homemade Pickles
Using the "Quick process" method...

Making and canning your own pickles, gherkins, kosher dills, bread and butter, sweet pickles, etc. is one of the easiest things you can do with produce! Here's how to do it, in easy steps and completely illustrated. It is much faster than the old method your grandmother used with tons of pickling salt and de-scumming the brine! Ugh! This method is so easy, ANYONE can do this! It's a great thing to do with your kids! I'm experimenting with the various techniques, such as soaking the cucumbers overnight in lime solution first, using "pickle crisp" etc. I'' revise this page as I taste the results in the weeks to come!

Types of Pickles
Fresh-pack (or quick process) pickles are cured for several hours in a vinegar solution or are immediately combined with hot vinegar, spices, and seasonings. Examples include dills, bread-and-butter pickles and pickled beets. Quick Process is what these instructions (below on this page) show.
Other types are:

Fermented pickles are vegetables soaked in a brine solution for 4 to 6 weeks. During this time, lactic acid bacteria, naturally present on the surface of vegetables, grows. Other microbes are inhibited by salt. The color of the vegetables changes from bright green to olive/yellow-green, and the white interior becomes translucent. Examples include dill pickles and sauerkraut.
Refrigerated dills are cucumbers marinated for 1 day to 1 week in a salt and spice brine (in the fridge) and then stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 months. No canning is required! See this page for refrigerated dill pickle directions!
Fruit pickles are whole or sliced fruit simmered in a spicy, sweet-sour syrup. Examples include spiced peaches and crabapples. See this page for directions to make spiced peaches!
Relishes are made from chopped fruits or vegetables that are cooked to a desired consistency in a spicy vinegar solution. Examples include corn relish and horseradish. See this page for cucumber pickle relish directions!
Ingredients and Equipment
Cucumbers - fresh, crisp - not wilted, soft or overripe!
Quick Process Pickling mix - It usually goes for about $2.00 to $4.00 per packet. A packet will make about a dozen pint jars. See this page for pickling supplies, equipment, books, crocks and additives
Clear vinegar - 4 cups of 5% vinegar, apple cider vinegar works well. Store brand is about $1.25 for a 64 oz bottle.
Jar grabber (to pick up the hot jars)
Lid lifter (has a magnet to pick the lids out of the boiling water where you sterilize them. ($2 at WalMart, Target, and sometimes at grocery stores)
Jar funnel ($2 at WalMart, Target, and sometimes at grocery stores)
1 large pot; teflon lined, glass or ceramic.
Large spoons and ladles
1 Canner (a huge pot to sterilize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 at mall kitchen stores, sometimes at WalMart (seasonal item). Note: we sell many sizes and types of canners for all types of stoves and needs - see canning supplies
Pint canning jars (Ball or Kerr jars can be found at Publix and WalMart - about $8 per dozen jars including the lids and rings). Be sure to get wide mouth jars to fit the pickles in! Pint size works best!
Lids - thin, flat, round metal lids with a gum binder that seals them against the top of the jar. They may only be used once.
Rings - metal bands that secure the lids to the jars. They may be reused many times.

Directions - How to Make Pickles
http://www.pickyourown.org/makingpickles.htm



Making Homemade Pickle Relish



Making and canning your own pickle relish is one of the easiest things you can do with your extra cucumbers!



Ingredients and Equipment
Yield: About 8 pints

About 6 lbs of pickling type cucumbers to yield 3 quarts chopped cucumbers
About 6 large peppers to produce 3 cups each of chopped sweet green and red peppers
2 onions (to yield 1 cup chopped onions)
3/4 cup canning or pickling salt
4 cups ice
8 cups water
2 cups sugar
4 tsp each of mustard seed, turmeric, whole allspice, and whole cloves See this page for pickling supplies, equipment, books, crocks and additives.
6 cups white vinegar (5%, apple cider vinegar works well. Store brand is about $1.25 for a 64 oz bottle.
Jar grabber (to pick up the hot jars)
Lid lifter (has a magnet to pick the lids out of the boiling water where you sterilize them. ($2 at WalMart, Target, and sometimes at grocery stores)
Jar funnel ($2 at WalMart, Target, and sometimes at grocery stores)
1 large pots; teflon lined, glass or ceramic.
Large spoons and ladles
1 Water Bath Canner (a huge pot to sterilize the jars after filling (about $30 to $35 at mall kitchen stores, sometimes at WalMart (seasonal item). Note: we sell many sizes and types of canners for all types of stoves and needs - see canning supplies
Half pint or pint canning jars (Ball or Kerr jars can be found at Publix and WalMart - about $8 per dozen jars including the lids and rings). Be sure to get wide mouth jars to fit the pickles in! Pint size works best!
Lids - thin, flat, round metal lids with a gum binder that seals them against the top of the jar. They may only be used once.
Rings - metal bands that secure the lids to the jars. They may be reused many times.




hey ho... I learned something! Razz

0 Replies
 
Izzie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 01:36 pm
@jespah,
Salt: Pure granulated salt, such as "pickling" or "canning" salt should be used. It can be purchased from grocery, hardware or farm supply stores. Other salts contain anti-caking materials that may make the brine cloudy. Do not alter salt concentrations in fermented pickles or sauerkraut. Proper fermentation depends on correct proportions of salt and other ingredients.

Vinegar: Use cider or white vinegar of 5-percent acidity (50 grain). This is the range of acidity for most commercially bottled vinegars. Cider vinegar has a good flavor and aroma, but may darken white or light-colored fruits and vegetables. White distilled vinegar is often used for onions, cauliflower and pears where clearness of color is desired. Do not use homemade vinegar or vinegar of unknown acidity in pickling. Do not dilute the vinegar unless the recipe specifies. If a less sour product is preferred, add sugar rather than dilute the vinegar.

Sugar: Use white sugar unless the recipe calls for brown. White sugar gives a product a lighter color, but brown sugar may be preferred for flavor. If you plan to use a sugar substitute, follow recipes developed for these products. Sugar substitutes are not usually recommended, as heat and/or storage may alter their flavor. Also, sugar helps to plump the pickles and keep them firm.

Spices: Use fresh whole spices for the best quality and flavor in pickles. Powdered spices may cause the product to darken and become cloudy. Pickles will darken less if you tie whole spices loosely in a clean white cloth or cheesecloth bag and then remove the bag from the product before packing the jars. Spices deteriorate and quickly lose their pungency in heat and humidity. Therefore, store any unused spices in an airtight container in a cool place.

Water: When brining pickles, hard water may interfere with the formation of acid and prevent pickles from curing properly. To soften hard water, simply boil it 15 minutes and let set for 24 hours, covered. Remove any scum that appears. Slowly pour water from the containers so the sediment will not be disturbed. Discard the sediment. The water is now ready for use. Distilled water can also be used in pickle making, but is more expensive.

Firming Agents: If good-quality ingredients are used and up-to-date methods are followed, the lime and alum are not needed for crisp pickles. Soaking cucumbers in ice water for four to five hours prior to pickling is a safer method for making crisp pickles. If you choose to use firming agents, alum may be safely used to firm fermented cucumbers, but does not work with quick process pickles.


The calcium in lime does improve pickle firmness. If you choose to use lime, purchase food-grade pickling lime from your grocer's shelves. Do not use agricultural or burnt lime. Food-grade lime may be used as a lime-water solution for soaking fresh cucumbers 12 to 24 hours before pickling them. However, EXCESS LIME ABSORBED BY THE CUCUMBERS MUST BE REMOVED TO MAKE SAFE PICKLES. To remove excess lime, drain the lime-water solution, rinse and then re-soak the cucumbers in fresh water for one hour. REPEAT THE RINSING AND SOAKING STEPS TWICE MORE.

0 Replies
 
alex240101
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 01:58 pm
Thank you jespah. Thank you Izzie.
Now were cooking with gas...
"tannins" Like a tannic acid. I could not find, what was in a grape leaf.
Like I stated before, I do have an experimental jar, in the refrigerator now, with a grape leaf.
Izzie. I have been to that pickyourown.org website. Good finds, good reads. Thank you.
Jar lifter conspiracy. Not one to be found in a twenty mile radius. Channellocks work fine, a bit dangerous.
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 02:30 pm
@alex240101,
what would we do without our channel locks?
0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 03:06 pm
@alex240101,
This recipe is called Winter Dill Pickles. These dills need to stand for two months before serving. The recipe calls for the quart sealers to be washed in hot, soapy water, but I prefer to sterilize them using the sanitizing cycle on my dishwasher. Another method is to heat them in the oven at 190-200 degrees F. Boil or scald the lids.

WINTER DILL PICKLES

(These keep well, retaining their flavour and crispness. Use freshly picked cucumbers. Wash them, cover with cold water and let them stand while preparing the sealers and brine. )

In each quart sealer place:
sprigs of fresh dill with seeds
1 - 2 cloves garlic
1 bay leaf
6 peppercorns
1/2 teaspoon mustard seed
1 small stalk celery

Prepare the following brine and bring to the boiling point:

14 cups water
3/4 cup vinegar
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup coarse salt, scant

Pack cucumbers into the sealers. Fill with the hot brine and cover with sprigs of fesh dill. Seal tightly. Store in a cool place. Allow the dills to stand for two months before serving.


0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 03:31 pm
@alex240101,
These Standard Dill Pickles will be ready in two days.

Use small or medium-sized cucumbers freshly picked from the garden. Wash them well, cover with cold water and let them stand while preparing the sealers, as with the above recipe. Place in each sealer:

a few cherry, grape or currant leaves
sprigs of fresh garlic with seeds
1 - 2 cloves garlic
fresh horseradish root, about a 2-inch piece
1 1/2 tablespoons coarse salt

Prick the cucumbers with a fork and pack closely into the sealers. Fill with either boiled water cooled to lukewarm or boiling water. When using boiling water, be careful not to crack the sealers. Cover the top with sprigs of dill and seal. Invert the sealers and shake them to dissolve the salt. If the pickles are to be used soon, keep them at room temperature. They will be ready in two to three days. For later use, store in a cool place.
alex240101
 
  2  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 03:53 pm
@mckenzie,
Thank you mckenzie. Dishwashing jars is neat. Quick.
Garlic seeds. I have a bazillion. Never would of thought.
I have been arm wrestling myself over the coarseness of the salt. Also wondering about how strong the garlic will be in four months.
mckenzie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2008 10:36 pm
@alex240101,
I'm confuzzled, Alex, I'm sorry. That should be sprigs of fresh DILL with seeds. Oh, my!

For coarse salt, I use sea salt.

Add more garlic cloves, to your taste.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Sep, 2008 12:45 am
Here's a recipe I got in an email newsletter from Fine Cooking --

http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/recipes/baby-carrots-pickled-champagne-sherry-vinegar.aspx?collection=101950
 

Related Topics

Pickles - Discussion by Swimpy
Pickle a whole lobster? - Question by PickleJerk
pickling without a canner - Question by USMC1819
Using coffe jars for pickling - Question by StooB
Cracked pickling crock - Question by paininass-100
pickled beets - Question by weather
Piccalilli - Question by Javelinman
My pickles blew up - Question by mrgood100
Claussen pickle recipe - Question by Shelly Quint
 
  1. Forums
  2. » I'm in a pickle
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/23/2019 at 10:08:30