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Help with German translations (slang)

 
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2007 03:18 pm
Reply to urs53
urs53 wrote:
JGoldman, I asked the kids - they didn't come up with anything either. Sorry!

As to your last question - all the combinations with 'Braut' work. I have never heard 'Motte' used in this way.


Hello urs53-thank you for responding and for your help.

"Lausmensch"

"ein Bub verloren gegangen"

a "verpatzter bub"

Are all three terms used in Germany, and is there a shorter way to say, "ein Bub verloren gegangen"?

I've seen the term "Dienermaedel" used-is this a German slang for "tomboy"?

Is "Krasse Alte" a vulgar term?
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2007 03:54 pm
JG :
many of these terms of "endearment" are often used locally .
since i grew up in hamburg/northern germany , the term "wilde biene" (sometimes "tolle biene" ) is certainly familiar to me .
it meant a girl that was just a little on the wild side . it meant you could ask her out for a dance or a motorcycle ride without having to be concerned about a longterm commitment - but there were certainly no sexual undertones in those days !

"krasse alte" would certainly have gotten you into trouble if overheard by her husband/man/boyfriend . it would be like saying "she's gotten old and mean" .

"bub - bube" is usually used in southern germany/austria .
in hamburg one spoke of "junge , jung , knabe("knabenschule" = boys' school) .

even within a certain area of germany , such as northern germany , there were quite distinct words/expressions used that were often only understood by the locals .
since i grew up and worked in the port of hamburg before coming to canada , i'm still familiar with a fair number of words that were only understood there .

there are many books that have been written in the various dialects of germany . i have a collection of probably 30 to 40 books mainly written in the various north-german dialects , but also some written in bavarian dialect and austrian dialect .

i'll look in again and see what going on in this thread .
hbg

this website gives a pretty good overview of the "north-german dialects" - aka "plattdeutsch"

[URL=http://]http://www.plattmaster.de/sprache.htm[/URL]NORTH-GERMAN DIALECTS
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2007 03:58 pm
Reply to hamburger
hamburger wrote:
JG :
many of these terms of "endearment" are often used locally .
since i grew up in hamburg/northern germany , the term "wilde biene" (sometimes "tolle biene" ) is certainly familiar to me .
it meant a girl that was just a little on the wild side . it meant you could ask her out for a dance or a motorcycle ride without having to be concerned about a longterm commitment - but there were certainly no sexual undertones in those days !

"krasse alte" would certainly have gotten you into trouble if overheard by her husband/man/boyfriend . it would be like saying "she's gotten old and mean" .

"bub - bube" is usually used in southern germany/austria .
in hamburg one spoke of "junge , jung , knabe("knabenschule" = boys' school) .

even within a certain area of germany , such as northern germany , there were quite distinct words/expressions used that were often only understood by the locals .
since i grew up and worked in the port of hamburg before coming to canada , i'm still familiar with a fair number of words that were only understood there .

there are many books that have been written in the various dialects of germany . i have a collection of probably 30 to 40 books mainly written in the various north-german dialects , but also some written in bavarian dialect and austrian dialect .

i'll look in again and see what going on in this thread .
hbg

this website gives a pretty good overview of the "north-german dialects" - aka "plattdeutsch"

[URL=http://]http://www.plattmaster.de/sprache.htm[/URL]NORTH-GERMAN DIALECTS


Thank you. I'm interested in terms for "tough girl" and "tomboy"-can you please find out what German slang terms are used? Very Happy

Have you heard the term "Dienermaedel" used?
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2007 04:15 pm
JG :
"dienermaedel"
"diener" is male (male servant)
"maedel" is female (maedchen = girl)

this combination doesn''t sound right to me .
there is certainly a "WIENER - MAEDEL" , a girl (or rather "fraeulein") from vienna .

i wonder if the word you are looking for is "dienst-maedchen or dienst- maedel" ?
it would be an old-fashioned "housemaid" .

btw there is a separate german google at www.google.de .
i often find it helpful when looking for german information .
KEEP LOOKING !
hbg

old-fashioned "dienst-maedchen" in hamburg ca. 1850

http://www.genhist.org/dienstmaedchen_web.jpg
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2007 04:33 pm
Reply to hamburger
hamburger wrote:
JG :
"dienermaedel"
"diener" is male (male servant)
"maedel" is female (maedchen = girl)

this combination doesn''t sound right to me .
there is certainly a "WIENER - MAEDEL" , a girl (or rather "fraeulein") from vienna .

i wonder if the word you are looking for is "dienst-maedchen or dienst- maedel" ?
it would be an old-fashioned "housemaid" .

btw there is a separate german google at www.google.de .
i often find it helpful when looking for german information .
KEEP LOOKING !
hbg

old-fashioned "dienst-maedchen" in hamburg ca. 1850

http://www.genhist.org/dienstmaedchen_web.jpg

hi hamburger and thank you-I saw the term used here:

http://64.233.169.104/search?q=cache:NpqHO3b8hnkJ:www.fliegenfischer-forum.de/flyfishing/angel--und-fischlyrik-t251812-s45.html+Dienermaedel&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2007 06:00 pm
JG :
i saw that entry earlier but didn't realize that's where you had taken it from .
as you probably realize it's a german style a2k .
the members are communicating by composing poems and are sometimes not very precise in the use of the german language - they sometimes just make up words that you won't find in a dictionary .

they also are using their own imagination to make their poems rhyme - they are using "poetic license" .

an example is this little ditty :

Quote:
Der Zierfisch

Ziert der Zierfisch sich beim lecken
springt der geile Stör ins nächste Becken
Dort wartet schon die scharfe Flunder
und reißt sich rasch das Höschen runder


it's a rather funny little "poem" but would not get the approval of a german "herr professor" as "poetry" .

in the english language we can also find certain "nonsense poetry" ;
this appears in an article by george orwell :

Quote:
IN MANY languages, it is said, there is no nonsense poetry, and there is not a great deal of it even in English. The bulk of it is in nursery rhymes and scraps of folk poetry, some of which may not have been strictly nonsensical at the start, but have become so because their original application has been forgotten. For example, the rhyme about Margery Daw:
See-saw, Margery Daw,
Dobbin shall have a new master.
He shall have but a penny a day
Because he can't go any faster.


Or the other version that I learned in Oxfordshire as a little boy:

See-saw, Margery Daw,
Sold her bed and lay upon straw.
Wasn't she a silly slut
To sell her bed and lie upon dirt?


i don't know if this helps you at all , but am looking forward to a reply .

if you are looking for further interpretations , perhaps you can cite the text/website in which the word appears . it should help in finding a similar word in the other language .
hbg

here is an example of "poetry" from edward lear , which would be very difficult to translate into any other language imo :

Quote:
There was an Old Derry down Derry, who loved to see little folks merry;
So he made them a book, and with laughter they shook at the fun of that Derry down Derry.


Shocked Laughing
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Oct, 2007 06:14 pm
here is what i found for LAUSMENSCH :

Quote:


it's austrian (slang) for "bad girl" .

i came to it by way of a "german-austrian" dictionary (not a real dictionary , of course) .
as you can see , the austrian words/expressions have in many cases no linguistic relatioship to the german word - and vice versa .
hope you have some fun with it !
hbg

GERMAN-AUSTRIAN DICTIONARY
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 02:32 am
Reply to all
Hello. I'd like to know, how do you say, "big brother" and "big sister" in German?
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 04:17 am
Reply to all
What is a "wildfrau"?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 11:18 am
Re: Reply to all
JGoldman10 wrote:
Hello. I'd like to know, how do you say, "big brother" and "big sister" in German?


"Grosser Bruder" and "Grosse Schwester" - but just in the sense of older sibling, but not really like big brother is watching you (though it is tranlated such re Orwell).
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 11:19 am
Re: Reply to all
JGoldman10 wrote:
What is a "wildfrau"?


It should be "wilde Frau" - a 'wild thing', "ein heißer [heisser] Feger" :wink:
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 11:46 am
Re: Reply to all
Walter Hinteler wrote:
JGoldman10 wrote:
What is a "wildfrau"?


It should be "wilde Frau" - a 'wild thing', "ein heißer [heisser] Feger" :wink:


Thank you-does that mean "a wild or unruly girl"?

Can "Grosser Bruder" and "Grosse Schwester" each be written as single terms?

Are there any German slang terms for "big brother" and "big sister" as in someone people look up to?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 11:49 am
Re: Reply to all
JGoldman10 wrote:
Thank you-does that mean "a wild or unruly girl"?

No, not really:

Can "Grosser Bruder" and "Grosse Schwester" each be written as single terms?

Yes.

Are there any German slang terms for "big brother" and "big sister" as in someone people look up to?


Well, 'grosser Bruder' is rarely used for that (I'm not aware of the sister-type), but generally we would use the English words for such.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 12:04 pm
Re: Reply to all
Walter Hinteler wrote:
JGoldman10 wrote:
Thank you-does that mean "a wild or unruly girl"?

No, not really:

Can "Grosser Bruder" and "Grosse Schwester" each be written as single terms?

Yes.

Are there any German slang terms for "big brother" and "big sister" as in someone people look up to?


Well, 'grosser Bruder' is rarely used for that (I'm not aware of the sister-type), but generally we would use the English words for such.


Hello Walter and thank you-what context is "wilde frau" used in?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 12:18 pm
Opposite would be "gentle" - 'safte frau'.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 12:26 pm
walter wrote :

Quote:
'safte frau'


as long as you don't mean SAFTIGE( Shocked ) frau , things will be allright ! :wink:
hbg


btw some americans use the term ZAFTIG ! (yes , with a Z)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 12:28 pm
Sanft it should have been :wink:
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 12:58 pm
"sanft und milde" - i'm all for that ! :wink:
hbg
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Oct, 2007 01:29 pm
Reply to Walter
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Opposite would be "gentle" - 'safte frau'.


Hi-and thank you.

What I meant was, is "wilde Frau" a sexual or lewd term?

Someone told me it means a wild or savage woman.
0 Replies
 
JGoldman10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Oct, 2007 10:20 am
reply to all
Hello. Does anyone know any German slang terms for "powerfully-built female" that aren;t derogatory?
0 Replies
 
 

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