227
   

The Last Movie You Saw On DVD or VHS or TV.

 
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Aug, 2014 09:10 pm
Just watched 'The Wall' on TV, a 2012 sci-fi film about a woman trapped by a force field (the "wall") in a mountain valley..
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1745686/

********Spoiler********
It was a load of krap, we never saw any aliens or hardly anybody else, she just mooched around for a couple of years growing crops and hunting animals and writing her boring introspective soul-searching diary.
I only stuck with it to the end to see the aliens, but they never showed up and the film ended with her still trapped in there, so we never did find out who plonked the wall down. or why nobody rescued her! It was a German-made German-language film and judging by this effort the krauts have got a long way to go yet before they rival hollywood!
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Aug, 2014 10:04 pm
@snood,
I saw James Brown in Baltimore about 1964, he was with a big review with a ton of other great acts. About 5 girls from highschool got to the show, it was everything you could hope for. The Drifters, The Four Tops and I'd have to think to remember all the acts. We were there for 4 hours of music. James did a couple of songs, but he ended with please, please, please, falling to the stage and his guy coming out draping a robe around his shoulders, they start to lead him off and he tossed the cape and ran back to the mic. We were loving life.

I was worried what they might do with his story, I don't want to be disappointed either. Thanks, Snood, just from the few clips I saw it was clear the dance moves were not tight. Crap

I never liked the 4 Seasons, but people keep saying "oh you have to see it, it's great". I ask, do they sing the Frankie valley songs, oh yeah, that's what makes it great. Well I don't want to listen to their music, or an Abba tribute Band or Rod Stewart or Neil Diamond. But I do like a ton of other singers and bands. But nobody moved like James. He had the absolute best musicians with him.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Aug, 2014 07:56 pm
@panzade,
Thank you, panzade!
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Aug, 2014 08:03 pm
The 1991 true story crime film "Let Him Have It" was on TV again the other night.
****Spoiler*****
Two young crooks were cornered by police on the roof of an English warehouse in a bungled robbery one night in 1952.
One of them had a gun and shot a policeman dead and wounded another, but at their trial the gunman only got 10 years and amazingly the OTHER guy was hung!
There was a huge public outcry about it at the time
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Let_Him_Have_It
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2014 06:43 pm
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) : 8/10
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fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2014 06:52 pm
Uccellacci e uccellini, the one Pasolini feature I hadn't seen yet.
Touching film with "innocents" Totò and Ninetto Davoli, and a talking crow who happens to be some kind of a Marxist philosopher.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2014 08:15 pm
@fbaezer,
I watched 'Tombstone' again for the umpteenth time. It's the one with Kurt Russell and I watch it mainly for the scene between Ringo and Doc Holliday, where Holliday twirls a tin cup in the same fashion the cowboy Ringo twirled his gun. I don't know why I love that scene, but I do.
snood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Aug, 2014 11:09 am
@glitterbag,
I've watched it umpteen times too, even just recently. I have several favorite scenes. The one where Wyatt punks the Billy Bob Thornton character. The one where Wyatt tells Josephine she's a lady. Just about every scene when Doc says a memorable line like "You're a daisy if you do", or "I'm your huckleberry". So much I like about that movie...
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Aug, 2014 06:55 pm
@snood,
Val Kilmer was terrific in that film. His Virginia accent was very accurate and I think he has been the best Doc Holliday to date. I love that huckleberry line too, never heard it before that film but it was perfect.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Sep, 2014 01:47 am
Just watched two movies: The Master and Jane Eyre (2011). The Master featured Phillip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix and Amy Adams directed by Paul (whatever his middle name is) Anderson. He supposedly was inspired by the life of L. Ron Hubbard which he combined with stories Jason Robards told of being drunk during WWII and pieces from the life of John Steinbeck. He also used material he had previously discarded from early drafts of There Will Be Blood. Anderson is not a breezy and light individual.

Hoffman looked like Hemingway in this film which had a much older look to it, the way Citizen Kane might have looked had it be shot outdoors.

Someone once pointed out that although Charlotte Bronte says that neither Edward Rochester nor Jane Eyre are good looking, directors continually cast attractive actors in those roles. Mia Wasakawska is not a good looking woman. My jury is still out on Michael Fassbender. He alternately seems quite handsome and repulsive.

This version was superior to the leaden television version of a few years back starring Maggie Smith's son Toby Stephens. That was awful.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 09:56 pm
@snood,
Snood, I scored yesterday by watching "Inglorious Bastards" for probably the 40th time. It's a fictional story you wish had really happened. Christoph Waltze was frighteningly sinister, the entire cast was brilliant. I know it's not everybody's cuppa, but I was really impressed with Brad Pitt. I know folks that could have been Lt.Aldo Raine. Wow.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 09:56 pm
@glitterbag,
Alright, it's violent, but so is war.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Sep, 2014 10:15 pm
@glitterbag,
I watched "Saving Private Ryan" again last night, and that movie is really violent.

panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 07:55 am
@cicerone imposter,
It is. I have to skip certain scenes.
But it's also in the top 10 war movies IMO.
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Sep, 2014 09:08 pm
@panzade,
In terms of cinematography I think it ranks number one. It set the bar.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2014 01:40 am
@InfraBlue,
From Total Film.

Quote:
whether or not this is an honest account of World War Two is some-thing the glowing American reviews have ignored. And although the combat realism and period authenticity can't be questioned, other things will stick in the throats of non-American audiences.

Take the no-show of any Allies. While this is forgivable for Omaha Beach (a uniquely American cock-up), it's harder to explain as Captain Miller's eight-man unit move inland. Where are the British, the French, the Polish or the Canadians?

German audiences will likewise be weary at the continuing portrayal of the `master race'. The Americans are a likable blend of doe-eyed teenagers, corn-fed midwesterners and Deep South good ol' boys. When they're killed it's tragic, when they're wounded they cry out for water, morphine or their mothers. But when a German's killed, it's just another dead Nazi, shot down despite his shaven-head, jutting square jaw and piercing, blue eyes. An unbiased historical document? Yeah, right.


http://www.totalfilm.com/reviews/cinema/saving-private-ryan
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2014 05:07 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
Where are the British,

Well...the British are muckin' about near Caen under Monty's languid command Very Happy
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2014 05:43 am
@panzade,
One could be forgiven for believing Normandy was an all American show after viewing Spielberg's revisionism. In fact they made up less than half.

Quote:
On D-Day, the Allies landed around 156,000 troops in Normandy. The American forces landed numbered 73,000: 23,250 on Utah Beach, 34,250 on Omaha Beach, and 15,500 airborne troops. In the British and Canadian sector, 83,115 troops were landed (61,715 of them British): 24,970 on Gold Beach, 21,400 on Juno Beach, 28,845 on Sword Beach, and 7900 airborne troops.


http://www.ddaymuseum.co.uk/d-day/d-day-and-the-battle-of-normandy-your-questions-answered

At least Spielberg only bends the truth unlike U 571 which was a downright lie.

Quote:
U-571 is a 2000 war film directed by Jonathan Mostow, and starring Matthew McConaughey, Bill Paxton, Harvey Keitel, Thomas Kretschmann, Jon Bon Jovi, Jack Noseworthy, Will Estes, and Tom Guiry. In the film, a World War II German submarine is boarded in 1942 by disguised United States Navy submariners seeking to capture her Enigma cipher machine.

The film was financially successful and generally well-received by critics in the USA and won an Academy Award for sound editing. The fictitious plot attracted substantial criticism since, in reality, it was British personnel from HMS Bulldog who first captured a naval Enigma machine (from U-110 in the North Atlantic in May 1941), months before the United States had even entered the war. The anger over the inaccuracies even reached the British Parliament, where Prime Minister Tony Blair stated that the film was an "affront" to British sailors.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U-571_(film)
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2014 07:22 am
@izzythepush,
Quote:
One could be forgiven for believing Normandy was an all American show after viewing Spielberg's revisionism

Saving Private Ryan has little to do with the Normandy landing, except the opening scenes which depict the brutal experience of the American 1st and 29th infantry divisions trying to move inland from Omaha Beach.

The rest of the movie is loosely based on the true story of the Niland brothers

wiki
Quote:
Sergeant Frederick "Fritz" Niland (1920–1983),Company H, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division.

Fritz was close friends with Warren Muck and Donald Malarkey, from Company E, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division ("Easy Company"), who were both featured prominently in the 2001 HBO miniseries Band of Brothers.

Fritz fought with the 501st through the first few days of the Normandy campaign. Several days following D-Day, Fritz had gone to the 82nd Airborne Division to see his brother, Bob. Once he arrived at division, he was informed that Bob had been killed on D-Day.

Fritz was shipped back to England, and, finally, to the U.S. where he served as an MP in New York until the completion of the war.

Fritz was awarded a Bronze Star for his service.[2] This story is evidenced in Stephen Ambrose's book, Band of Brothers, as well as from biographical data on Sampson.

Fritz died in 1983 in San Francisco at the age of 63. Private James Ryan in Saving Private Ryan is loosely based on Fritz Niland.


A majority of the movie deals with the linking up of the 1st division with the paratroopers of the 501st and 506th regiments of the 101st airborne division near Neuville-au-Plain

Your scorn for Hollywood revisionism is on point in the matter of U-571 but badly misses the mark as far as Saving Private Ryan is concerned.


izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Sep, 2014 07:53 am
@panzade,
I have seen the film, and it is a good story, but it does whitewash the contributions made by other allied forces. Our films made in the 50s and 60s did the same. Now we know how the Poles, Czechs, Norwegians, Dutch, Indians, Africans, Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders felt.
0 Replies
 
 

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