22
   

What's Your No. 1 Grammar Pet Peeve?

 
 
Paola
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 04:53 pm
A LOT of people now say or write sentences like this:
Mother gave the cookies to Janie and I".

And dyslexia - a friend just wrote me an email with that "irregardless" "word" !!!
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 04:54 pm
Wink I could care less Wink
0 Replies
 
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 04:55 pm
"Irrespective" of the cat and the porch, the person fed will be me, standing next to that free food!
0 Replies
 
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 04:56 pm
dyslexia, Could you straighten me out on the "could" or "coudn't" care less?
0 Replies
 
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 04:59 pm
Paola, ever since I became a proofreader, my sweetheart has self-consciously put his pronouns after a preposition in the nominitive case.

I NEVER correct him, but these faulty pronoun references have really got to stop. He holds me accountable for his content, and darn it, I never know who did what to whom or how anybody felt about it!
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:04 pm
Phoenix, Honest and truly, ending a sentence with a preposition is no longer a no-no. And splitting an infinitive is no longer a no-no either.

My pet peeve--Just between you and I. They gave a free soda to him and I. <thud, as in falling on the floor>
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:11 pm
Phoenix32890 wrote:
Quote:
"From where are you?"


How 'bout, "Where did you live before you moved here?", or more simply, "Where's your home town?"


Both are better. But that does not change the fact that the Latin rule about prepositions does not apply to English.
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:13 pm
Re could or couldn't care less:

I had long hated the "could care less" as I found it was devoid of logic. but then someone gave a interesting logical defence:

"I could care less because I care not at all."
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:14 pm
The constant training required to keep up with all the rules of grammar. c.i.
0 Replies
 
Sofia
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:35 pm
OK.

If you already do not care at all, I posit that you couldn't care less.
If you could care less, it implies you do care somewhat.

Me: Hate I instead of me, as someone here said.

People seem to think 'me' should practically never be used.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:39 pm
"Looking to. . . " as in "I'm looking to buy a car. I will not swear it is incorrect, but grate it does.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:43 pm
Ciao, Paola!

My pet peeve may not be ungrammatical. I am uncomfortable when people use the word graduate with the words high school or college after it; for example, "he graduated high school", or "when I graduate college, I will...".

I think of graduate as a transitive verb meaning to demarcate an object into parts, as to graduate a beaker or cylinder, thereby achieving a graduated cylinder. When I left high school, I graduated from it. Were I to graduate high school, I would divide it into freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years....in my humble opinion.

The New York Times and everybody else on earth now skips the preposition, so
I trust my teeth gnash alone.
0 Replies
 
Sofia
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:46 pm
In the South, we are in a continous mode of fixing to accomplish things.
"I'm fixin' to beat your ass."
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:47 pm
Sofia wrote:
OK.

If you already do not care at all, I posit that you couldn't care less.
If you could care less, it implies you do care somewhat.

Me: Hate I instead of me, as someone here said.

People seem to think 'me' should practically never be used.


Amen to both.
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 05:49 pm
I swear that I does be less irritated by "looking to" than "fixing to".

Living in Texas was my greatest grammatical pet peeve.
0 Replies
 
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 06:00 pm
c.i. Love your irony!

Craven, duh . . . still lost and I really do care a lot. It was in a recent book I proofread. The copyeditor had changed "could" to "couldn't" and I flagged it for my boss to consider. So . . . which is right after all?
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 06:04 pm
dupre,

That's kinda like asking which of the following sentences is grammatically correct:

One plus one is two.

or

One plus one is three.


IMO it's more of a logic issue than grammar. That being said I'd never use "could".
0 Replies
 
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 06:04 pm
Lightbulb! I think I've got it. If I couldn't care less, then I care the absolute least there is to care and less is not even an option.

OK. So the copyeditor got it right!

I was confulsed thinking that using "not" and "less" together somehow constitutes a double negative.
0 Replies
 
dupre
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 06:07 pm
Sofia, my sweetheart is always "fixin' to" do something, which is why people always ask him if he's "done yet."
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Jun, 2003 06:22 pm
Me and my shadow...... ci
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/25/2021 at 09:39:53