22
   

What's Your No. 1 Grammar Pet Peeve?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Jun, 2011 06:04 am
@roger,
Yes, we do..
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Jun, 2011 01:41 pm
@ossobuco,
Not a peeve exactly, but. . . .
0 Replies
 
MirandaB
 
  1  
Reply Thu 9 Jun, 2011 10:18 pm
Hi all.
I have a few "pet hates" when it comes to grammar:

People who don't know how to use apostrophes correctly, either not using them when they should or (bizarrely) using them when they are not needed e.g. with plurals.

People who write "your" when they mean "you're" (as in "you are"). I think this is possibly the single most common grammatical error, among people of all ages. Unless anyone can think of a more common one??

People who say "was" instead of "were", e.g. "What was you doing?"

However, the one which annoys me most is "should of" or "would of" instead of "should have" and "would have".

AAARRGGHHH!!!

Miranda x
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Jun, 2011 11:24 pm
@MirandaB,
Quote:
People who write "your" when they mean "you're" (as in "you are"). I think this is possibly the single most common grammatical error, among people of all ages.

However, the one which annoys me most is "should of" or "would of" instead of "should have" and "would have".


Those are spelling mistakes, Miranda, not grammar mistakes.
oliwek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 06:48 pm
@dyslexia,
there is no word "irregardless" --- i guess that's my grammar pet peeve
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 07:02 pm
@oliwek,
Quote:
there is no word "irregardless" ---
ACtually there is. Its considered a colloquialism and not of good form (sorta like sorta, or aint, or dares'nt)
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 07:03 pm
@oliwek,
Oh, I like that one! Makes me feel kind of smug for knowing.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Jun, 2011 07:04 pm
@oliwek,
Quote:
there is no word "irregardless"


Actually, there is, Oliwek.

=============================

M-W

regardless

Usage Discussion of IRREGARDLESS

Irregardless originated in dialectal American speech in the early 20th century. Its fairly widespread use in speech called it to the attention of usage commentators as early as 1927. The most frequently repeated remark about it is that “there is no such word.” There is such a word, however. It is still used primarily in speech, although it can be found from time to time in edited prose. Its reputation has not risen over the years, and it is still a long way from general acceptance. Use regardless instead.

0 Replies
 
MirandaB
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 09:39 am
@JTT,
Hi JTT.

I disagree! In both those cases, the actual words are in fact spelt correctly.....it is incorrect usage of the word or phrase, which in my book makes these grammatical errors.

What does everyone else think??

Thanks.

Miranda x
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 09:55 am
@MirandaB,
People who write "your" when they mean "you're" (as in "you are"). I think this is possibly the single most common grammatical error, among people of all ages.

However, the one which annoys me most is "should of" or "would of" instead of "should have" and "would have".

=======================

Quote:
Hi JTT.

I disagree! In both those cases, the actual words are in fact spelt correctly.....it is incorrect usage of the word or phrase, which in my book makes these grammatical errors.


Good day, Miranda.

The actual words are misspelled, because the actual words are being used. People just choose the wrong spelling. You've yourself have noted just how common these errors are.

English has strong and weak pronunciations for a number of very common words. You've provided some examples of the more common ones. These mistakes happen to everyone at one time or another, to some more than others.

They happen to all of us all the time when we speak.

Do you think that when people make these slip ups they actually don't understand the grammar? When we write things like, "He shudda"; "she wuddav", we are also writing the sounds we make in speech.

0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 02:39 pm
@MirandaB,
I agree at least with the general possibility of what you say. She used to say things like, "Are you taking the day off, are what?" Now, I didn't realize this till I saw it in print, but it is clearly not a spelling error. She was using are what as some kind of chunk that clearly should have been or what.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 05:04 pm
@roger,
Who is "she", Roger?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 05:36 pm
@JTT,
I suppose I should have put it in quotes and said "Someone".

Now you're going to ask what "it" is?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Jun, 2011 11:31 pm
@roger,
Quote:
Now you're going to ask what "it" is?


Nope, there's an antecedent for 'it', Rog.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Jun, 2011 01:06 am
@JTT,
You're right.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2011 03:22 am
I bought a car off my neighbor.

Would you please just buy it from your neighbor, like everyone else.
ragnel
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2011 07:48 pm
@roger,
Not if your neighbour's wife got so pissed off with her husband that she drove his car smack-bang into him and he was still stuck underneath it when she sold it to you.

And I agree, MirandaB, there is a grammatical difference between 'your' (possessive adjective), and 'you're' or 'you are' (part if the verb 'to be' - ie, I am, you are, he/she is, etc), just as there is between 'of' (preposition) and 'have' (Auxilliary verb used with a past participle to form the present perfect, past perfect tenses indicating completed action.

Misspelling indeed!

JTT wrote
Quote:
Do you think that when people make these slip ups they actually don't understand the grammar?

Yes!
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2011 09:29 pm
@MirandaB,
There is a word for those kind of mistakes, which I don't remember. Not the obvious word, homonyms.

Those are my main mistakes, heh, that I've observed. Thomas is the one who described them well, on some earlier post.

I don't think they are grammatical errors - I think they happen in the brain before grammar and spurt out of our typing fingers.

Any time I do one of those errors, I've known better from decades of usage.

There is some kind of brain pre-emp, in my view.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Aug, 2011 09:46 pm
@ragnel,
You're clearly out of your depth here, Ragnel. These are not grammatical mistakes. They are spelling errors.

Osso's post has proved that you are mistaken.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Aug, 2011 12:52 am
@roger,
Quote:
I bought a car off my neighbor.

Would you please just buy it from your neighbor, like everyone else.


?? I bought a car my neighbor. ??

It's so damn easy, Roger, to just do the tiniest bit of thinking when it comes to language. You oughta try it sometime.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.07 seconds on 11/30/2021 at 05:31:20