12
   

Soup! (inspired by ehbeth and edgar)

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Fri 22 Dec, 2006 03:07 pm
The ingredients for this Christmas Soup can easily be guessed from the pic, I think

http://i10.tinypic.com/2d9r0qx.jpg

A Merry Christmas to all!


You could have it on New Year's Eve as well - perhaps with different quantities :wink:


Happy New Year!
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jan, 2007 11:12 am
joefromchicago wrote:
I love soup!

I promised JPB I'd post this. It's one of my favorite recipes. I got it off the internet, but now I can't remember the website where I found it. As with most of my recipes, I've made a few changes to suit my particular tastes. Preparing all of the ingredients takes a while, but then you just throw everything into the pot and relax for two hours.

Portuguese Stone Soup*

8 cups chicken stock
1/2 lb linguiƧa** or chorizo, diced
1 can kidney beans, drained
1 lb potatoes, peeled and diced
1 can (14 1/2 oz) diced tomatoes
1 small head savoy cabbage, chopped
1 lb turnips, peeled and diced
2 leeks (white and light green parts), chopped
2 large carrots, sliced
1 large onion, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 bay leaf

Combine all ingredients in large stock pot. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until soup is thick, stirring occasionally, about two hours. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

*It's called "stone soup" because the kidney beans are called "stones" by the Portuguese. Or, at least, that's what the website said. I'm waiting for a genuine Portuguese person to confirm this.

**LinguiƧa is a spicy Portuguese sausage. Unless you live in Rhode Island or southeastern Massachusetts, you probably don't have a Portuguese deli in your neighborhood, so you can substitute Spanish or Mexican chorizo or some other kind of spiced sausage.


joe, I've just emailed this recipe to the fourth person who has requested it. My latest batch turned out as good as the first time. This one is definitely a keeper!
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jan, 2007 04:57 pm
JPB wrote:
joe, I've just emailed this recipe to the fourth person who has requested it. My latest batch turned out as good as the first time. This one is definitely a keeper!

That's great! Were you able to get Savoy cabbage this time, or did you opt for the kale again?
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jan, 2007 05:14 pm
I went with the kale. One friend tried mine and then made her own with savoy. She said they were both good and couldn't pick a preference.
0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  1  
Sat 15 Sep, 2007 07:45 pm
Thanking joefromchicago again for the Portuguese stone soup recipe. I've a double recipe simmering on the stove this evening.

I used regular cabbage. I had all the other ingredients except the savoy cabbage. Mr. M likes cabbage and won't mind the stronger taste.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Mon 17 Sep, 2007 07:46 am
mckenzie wrote:
Thanking joefromchicago again for the Portuguese stone soup recipe. I've a double recipe simmering on the stove this evening.

I used regular cabbage. I had all the other ingredients except the savoy cabbage. Mr. M likes cabbage and won't mind the stronger taste.

Very glad you like it. I often use regular cabbage in place of the savoy cabbage. I agree: it's a slightly more assertive flavor, but very good.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Mon 17 Sep, 2007 07:54 am
I missed the soup the first time around -- looks great, I'd like to try it.

What comes to mind when I see "stone soup" is the story of the clever traveler who comes to a village one evening, hoping for dinner. Everyone insists that they have no extra food, to avoid feeding this stranger. He then says that no matter, he'll make his own soup, and asks for merely a large kettle. He makes a fire, fills the kettle with water, sets the kettle over the fire, and with a great flourish takes out an ordinary-looking stone. He says he can make the most wonderful soup with this stone, and drops it in the water.

After it simmers for a while, he takes a sip and proclaims it delicious. He muses in an offhand way that some potatoes might add a bit of flavor. The villagers look at each other, and one goes off to his house and brings back some potatoes. The traveler says oh, so kind of you, and drops them in. Sips... wonderful! Hmm, maybe some turnips, though.

On it goes, carrots, onion, kidney beans, cabbage, etc.... Finally he proclaims it perfect, and the everyone in the village enjoys a steaming bowl of wondrous stone soup!
0 Replies
 
FreeDuck
 
  1  
Mon 17 Sep, 2007 08:25 am
Mmm, I was just thinking about soup this morning and how it's the right season for it now. Bookmarking for yummy recipes.
0 Replies
 
mushypancakes
 
  1  
Sat 13 Oct, 2007 03:15 pm
The Portugese Stone Soup is a hit around here, too.

It's really delicious. Mm mmm.

Officially in soup making mode.

Oh, stew recipes are welcome too! Smile
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Sun 14 Oct, 2007 08:57 am
Almost time to get into official soup-creating mode here, too.
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Sun 14 Oct, 2007 09:19 am
I made a really good fridge soup the other day.

I used 2 cups of green lentils
1 cube of vegan tomato boullion ( or how ever you spell that)
And one vegan vegetable cube of boullion
3 tablespoons of tomato paste
1/4 cup of fresh basil leaves ( in my garden)
3 tablespoons of rosemary leaves ( again, from the garden)
1 leek ( whole thing, chopped up )
1 tablespoon of garlic powder
1/2 head of broccoli
1/2 head of celery
1 can of corn
3 large carrots sliced
2 potatoes cubed
2 cups of vegetable stock
and 2 cups of water


it was gooooood.

I do not remember how long I cooked it for, but I just put everything in ( saving the corn + celery for last ) and cooked it on medium heat until the lentils were soft.
Then I turned off the heat, added the corn and celery, covered it and let it cool for a while before dinner.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Sun 14 Oct, 2007 09:53 am
I have a whole chicken simmering away in a stew pot on the stove as I write. Looking forward to some chicken and dumplings later tonight and chicken salad sandwiches and chicken soup for several days next week.

Chicken and dumplings give me very fond memories of my mom's aunt. When ever we'd visit she'd ask what we wanted for dinner and her chicken and dumplings were always the request. I've never been able to duplicate how she did it. I know I've used the same ingredients and method she wrote down in her recipe, but I have a feeling the pot is what makes the difference. She made hers in a very old cast iron dutch oven with a heavy lid.
0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  1  
Sun 14 Oct, 2007 11:45 pm
We've had an over-abundance of tomatoes from our three plants this year, way more than we've been able to use, and the herbs in the garden are knee-high, so I wondered what I could do with them in the way of soup. I eventually came across this recipe for Roasted Tomato Basil Soup on the Food Network website (courtesy of Ina Gartner, The Barefoot Contessa). I've made it several times and it's a keeper. I just used the tomatoes from the garden.

3 pounds ripe plum tomatoes, cut in half
1/4 cup plus 2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp kosher salt
1 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 cups chopped onions
6 garlic cloves, minced
2 tbsp unsalted butter
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1 (28-oz) can plum tomatoes with juice
4 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
1 quart chicken stock or water

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Toss together tomatoes, 1/4 cup olive oil, salt and pepper. Spread the tomatoes on a baking sheet and roast for 45 minutes.

In an 8-qt. stockpot over medium heat, saute the onions and garlic with two tbsp olive oil, butter and red pepper flakes for 10 minutes, until the onions start to brown. Add canned tomatoes basil, thyme and chicken stock. Add oven-roasted tomatoes, including the liquid. Boil and simmer uncovered for 40 minutes. Pass through a food mill. Season. Serve hot or cold.

It freezes well. Try serving it with homemade garicky croutons and grated parmesan cheese.

(Probably only a practical recipe if you grow your own herbs. Four cups of basil leaves would be fairly pricey to purchase.)
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Tue 16 Oct, 2007 03:06 pm
joefromchicago wrote:
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Wait until I've tried to figure the details .... and then to translate that ... of my real favourite soup: Walter's pea soup. :wink:

I made split pea soup this weekend -- one of my favorites! I look forward to the Hinteler family version.

Another recipe that I make all the time...

VEGETABLE-HAM SOUP WITH PASTA

This is courtesy of my good friend Betty Crocker, with some slight alterations. I'm posting it here so in case I lose the cookbook I'll still have this recipe. It's a terrific way to use fennel (I'm sure you have some sitting in the fridge right now). The fennel adds an interesting bite to this soup, and the crushed red pepper gives it a spicy kick.

1 large fennel bulb, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1 cup uncooked rotini, farfalle, or other medium pasta
1 medium carrot, sliced
1 cup water
1/2 tsp oregano
1/2 tsp crushed red pepper
2 cans (14 1/2 oz each) chicken broth
2 cups cooked smoked ham (about 1/2 lb), diced
1 tbsp olive oil

1. Saute fennel, onion, and carrot in oil until onions are translucent, about ten minutes.

2. Stir in remaining ingredients except ham; heat to boiling, cover and simmer until pasta is tender, about ten minutes.

3. Add ham; heat about two minutes until ham is hot.


I must have missed this one last year. Sounds good! I'm off to buy stone soup ingredients for tomorrow. This one looks good too. It's not quite cold enough yet for the barley soup with ham. That one is more a middle of the winter, stick to your ribs kind of soup. The vegetable-ham soup with pasta sounds slightly less hearty.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Tue 16 Oct, 2007 03:15 pm
Butrflynet's chicken and dumpling idea sounds good - I did pick out a recipe to do that just last week. I don't follow recipes much, being more of a what looks good at the market and what can I put with it type, though I make a soup like JoefromChicago's fairly often, with, natch, variations.

Heh, I DO have an old cast iron dutch oven with heavy lid.. (it was from an army-navy store.)
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Tue 16 Oct, 2007 05:24 pm
change 'o plans -- tonight's dinner plans tanked, tomorrow's dinner plans stepped in. Stone Soup is bubbling in the cauldron and it smells mighty good in here.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Tue 16 Oct, 2007 05:56 pm
This week's soup is chicken broth with mashed up sweet potatoes and squash. Simple, clean, cheap, fresh, and tasty.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Tue 16 Oct, 2007 06:06 pm
Sounds good, Mame.

Shewolf, your soup sounded good too -

I'm more used to the italian battuto (another name in France) involving sauteing onions, carrots, celery, garlic (one, two or more of those) first, then adding everything else. (Usually not adding garlic as the first item, lest it burn fast). Not every culture on earth hates burned garlic, but, heh, not all do like it.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Tue 16 Oct, 2007 06:18 pm
ossobuco wrote:
Sounds good, Mame.

Shewolf, your soup sounded good too -

I'm more used to the italian battuto (another name in France) involving sauteing onions, carrots, celery, garlic (one, two or more of those) first, then adding everything else. (Usually not adding garlic as the first item, lest it burn fast). Not every culture on earth hates burned garlic, but, heh, not all do like it.


Me, too, but where I'm living, I don't have a stove, only a microwave... means I have to get simple and creative.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Tue 16 Oct, 2007 06:30 pm
Gee, that's a challenge.

I, on the other hand, didn't have a microwave for about a year and a half here, which should be no big thing, having lived most of my life without one, but I was glad to finally get it out of storage.

I lived with Dys and Diane's patio refrigerator for quite a while, and thanks to them. THAT was instructive.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

um um good - Discussion by dyslexia
Top 5 ALL TIME Campbell's Condensed Soups - Discussion by hawkeye10
Pork Soup - Question by Victor Murphy
HOT MONKEY SEX - Question by farmerman
Weird recipe direction - Question by boomerang
Soup for Dogs - Discussion by ossobuco
Soup from the gods, my recipe or yours - Discussion by ossobuco
Barley, barley, who's got the barley? - Discussion by ossobuco
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 01/27/2021 at 05:09:20