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Soup! (inspired by ehbeth and edgar)

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 04:19 pm
I've posted at least dozens - and maybe more - soups on a2k, most of them made up on the spot, so that I then call them "kitchen soups" or "refrigerator soups". They are often similar to JoefromChicago's Portuguese Stone Soup, though ingredients vary. I tend to use fresh (as opposed to purhased cooked) hot italian sausage, but have been known to add linguica or bacon or no meat at all. Sometimes the "meat" is fish, and the broth clam or fish - I've used Tilapia recently, often add clams at the last minute, and have been known to add (watching everyone gag) some cut-up sardines in portuguese hot sauce.

Recently I've gotten into roasting veggies, which I use as side dishes or put in soup. I bring this up since I tried roasting fennel. - say in a pan of rough cut onions and some carrots, tossed in some olive oil. Gads, delicious, though the fennel is fairly chewy.
Anyway, I make soup at least once a week, even in summer, so I'm always avid to see what works together.

I still plan to do a soup Msolga posted, one by Maddhur Jaffey, involving mung beans or red lentils. It's over on the dinner thread, I'll go find a link.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 04:37 pm
OK, I messed up. It's on MsOlga's Indian Cooking thread, on page 3, and it's not really a soup, just sort of soupy - or at least the one time I made dahl, it was on the soupy side.


MUNG DAHL

Recipe By : Madhur Jaffrey
Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Ethnic Vegetarian

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 1/2 c Mung dahl, split
2 ea Garlic cloves, peeled
2 sl Fresh ginger, peeled
1 tb Cilantro
1 tb Tumeric
1/2 ts Cayenne, optional
1 1/2 ts Salt
1 1/2 tb Lemon juice
3 tb Ghee
1 pn Asafetida
1 t Whole cumin seeds
Lemon wedges

Clean & wash dahl. Place in a heavy pot. Add 5 c
water & bring to a boil. Reduce heat & remove froth.
Add garlic, ginger, cilantro, turmeric & cayenne.
Cover, leaving lid slightly ajar & cook for 1 1/2
hours. Stir occasionally. When cooked, add salt &
lemon juice.

In a skillet, heat ghee till hot. Add asafetida & a
few seconds later, add the cumin. When the cumin
seeds darken, remove from heat & add to the cooked
dahl & serve.

Madhur Jaffrey, "An Invitation to Indian Cooking"
http://www.able2know.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=2173447#2173447

The rest of us pled for MsOlga to tell us about mung beans and asafoetida (which turns out can be skipped)...
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 04:48 pm
joefromchicago wrote:
mckenzie and JPB: Let me know how it turns out!


Substitutions were required and it's still simmering, but the taste tests are wonderful. Neither of two grocery stores had savoy cabbage today (no explanation, as they both typically carry it) so I substituted kale. Also, kidney beans in this household would equate to 'brick soup' so I substituted a combination of red beans and lentils.

My typical pattern is to stir and taste throughout the cooking process. I'll have had a full bowl by the time it's officially done, meaning a single bowl will suffice for dinner. It's delicious, joe, thanks again.


Does anyone have a good recipe for a soup with barley?
0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 05:15 pm
Joefromchicago, Mr. M's verdict on the Portuguese stone soup - excellent!

He and the dog came back from their walk just as I was taking it off the stove, so he had a sample, then another and finally a bowl-full. Good thing dinner's not 'til 8:00 p.m. or later.

The market had both mild and hot Portuguese chorizo. He chose the hot, so the soup is spicy, which he likes. No salt and pepper required. The sausage added enough seasoning.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 05:18 pm
JPB wrote:
Substitutions were required and it's still simmering, but the taste tests are wonderful. Neither of two grocery stores had savoy cabbage today (no explanation, as they both typically carry it) so I substituted kale. Also, kidney beans in this household would equate to 'brick soup' so I substituted a combination of red beans and lentils.

Odd that the stores wouldn't have savoy cabbage. I've used regular cabbage (about half a regular head) as a substitute. Kale is a common ingredient in Portuguese cooking, so that should work too.

JPB wrote:
Does anyone have a good recipe for a soup with barley?


BARLEY SOUP WITH HAM

From the internet. This is about the only recipe that I make on a regular basis that uses allspice -- I'm usually not a big fan of it, but it tastes great in this soup.

3 tb vegetable oil
1 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, chopped
2 carrots, diced
2 ribs celery, diced
3/4 cup pearl barley
6 cups chicken broth
1 sm bay leaf
1/4 tsp ground allspice
1/2 c diced smoked ham
3 tb butter
1/2 lb fresh mushrooms, chopped
3 tsp lemon juice
1 tb fresh parsley leaves, minced

Heat oil and saute onions, celery, and carrots until softened, about 5 minutes. Raise heat to medium, stir in the garlic and saute for one more minute. Add the barley, broth, bay leaf, and allspice. Bring to a boil. Simmer, covered, for about one hour, or until the barley is tender. (The soup may be prepared in advance to this point.)

Stir the ham into the piping hot soup and let simmer while you prepare the mushrooms. Heat the butter in a small skillet, add the mushrooms and lemon juice, and stir-cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the parsley. Add the mushroom mixture to the soup and simmer for 5 minutes longer. Discard the bay leaf. Season the soup with salt and freshly- ground pepper to taste. Ladle into warmed bowls and serve immediately.

RED BEAN AND BARLEY SOUP

From Saved by Soup (which is either a cookbook or a strange religious cult). Very simple to make. Of course, if the family doesn't like kidney beans, then this isn't the recipe for them.

1/2 cup pearl barley
2 tsp olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
4 cups red kidney beans, soaked and drained, or two cans, drained
4 cups chicken stock
2 tbsp parsley

1. Saute onion in oil until soft, about five minutes. Stir in beans and stock and bring to a boil; simmer covered for 15 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, in small saucepan, combine barley with water and bring to a boil; simmer for five minutes. Drain barley, rinse, set aside.

3. Transfer beans and onions to food processor, or use immersion blender, and process mixture for 4 to 5 seconds, enough to finely chop the beans but not puree them. Return mixture to pot and stir well to blend.

4. Add barley; bring to a boil and simmer for 30 minutes.

5. Stir in parsley. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 05:23 pm
mckenzie wrote:
Joefromchicago, Mr. M's verdict on the Portuguese stone soup - excellent!

He and the dog came back from their walk just as I was taking it off the stove, so he had a sample, then another and finally a bowl-full. Good thing dinner's not 'til 8:00 p.m. or later.

The market had both mild and hot Portuguese chorizo. He chose the hot, so the soup is spicy, which he likes. No salt and pepper required. The sausage added enough seasoning.

Glad you enjoyed it! You're right: the seasoning from the sausage is usually enough to flavor the entire soup (the original recipe called for twice as much sausage and half as much cabbage -- I think my proportions make for a better balance).
0 Replies
 
mckenzie
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 05:51 pm
I actually used a pound of the chorizo (well, 2 pounds because I doubled the recipe). Once it was in the pot, it "looked" like it needed more, so Mr. M went back to the market for another pound. I seem to have reverted to the original! Very Happy

Most of it's going into the freezer tomorrow. I'll bet that it'll taste even better when the flavours have had time to blend overnight.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 07:03 pm
Red beans and barley?!?! I'm in heaven, or a new member of the cult. I'll let you know.

The stone soup is wonderful. I also used a spicey chorizo and held back on the salt. The kale worked out nicely in place of the cabbage. I concur with Mr M.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 07:14 pm
I think pinto beans would also be fine with barley ...

What got me started on all this was me and other members of a construction/design class being invited by the teacher to his house, since we were close by when looking at a certain project, and his wife served us all from a big pot of soup that involved cabbage and potatoes and sausage, quite simple, with sliced crusty bread on the side. That was 25 years ago, and I've been riffing on that day of happiness (have you ever seen me happy?) since then. Thus you can predict I like kale and chard in soup too...
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Sun 26 Nov, 2006 07:41 pm
Yeah, osso, I had to chose between kale and chard as a substitute. I went with the kale because of the cooking time.

And, yes, I think I've seen you happy.
0 Replies
 
Bohne
 
  1  
Mon 27 Nov, 2006 05:39 am
My favourites are
pumpkin soup with cheese dumplins
spinach soup
crab-meat and sweet corn
and on saturday we had a minestrone which was yummy.

I'll have to get the recipes one of these days if you are interested.
Hope you are still into soup.
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Mon 27 Nov, 2006 07:19 am
Just finished the last of the "kitchen sink" borscht. (Soup! It's not just for breakfast! Surprised ) Was roasting a chicken a couple of days ago and since there was lots of room in the pan (is it just me or are chickens now the size of the Cornish hens of my youth?) added onions, carrots, potatoes, and cabbage. Next day chopped up the leftover veggies, added a large can of diced tomatoes and some chicken stock (and a couple tablespoons of red wine vinegar as a nod to Borscht) -- voila!

Just read a recipe for parsnip chowder and will post of it's any good.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Mon 27 Nov, 2006 08:59 am
mckenzie wrote:
I actually used a pound of the chorizo (well, 2 pounds because I doubled the recipe). Once it was in the pot, it "looked" like it needed more, so Mr. M went back to the market for another pound. I seem to have reverted to the original! Very Happy

Can't argue with what works. It's clearly a very adaptable recipe.

mckenzie wrote:
Most of it's going into the freezer tomorrow. I'll bet that it'll taste even better when the flavours have had time to blend overnight.

I agree.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Mon 27 Nov, 2006 08:59 am
Bohne wrote:
My favourites are
pumpkin soup with cheese dumplins
spinach soup
crab-meat and sweet corn
and on saturday we had a minestrone which was yummy.

I'll have to get the recipes one of these days if you are interested.
Hope you are still into soup.

I'd certainly be interested in seeing those recipes.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Mon 27 Nov, 2006 09:01 am
JPB wrote:
Red beans and barley?!?! I'm in heaven, or a new member of the cult. I'll let you know.

The stone soup is wonderful. I also used a spicey chorizo and held back on the salt. The kale worked out nicely in place of the cabbage. I concur with Mr M.

I have a couple of kale soup recipes that I like. If I find them, I'll post them.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Mon 27 Nov, 2006 01:22 pm
joefromchicago wrote:
mckenzie and JPB: Let me know how it turns out!


More feedback: I have staff working here today. We had stone soup for lunch. The recipe was copied and samples sent home for dinner tonight. Raves from all!
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Tue 28 Nov, 2006 12:42 am
I posted this recipe on the Hebonics thead. Just plain old chicken soup.

No big secret ingredient or anything like that. Standard chicken soup ingredients. The secret is the cooking time. Once it starts to smell and look like soup, keep cooking for at least another hour. When it's refrigerated, it will turn to gel. That's soup.

Ingredients
1 chicken (I prefer chicken parts, dark meat--thighs and legs)
celery (about three or four stalks cut in half and tied together)
2 or 3 whole carrots peeled and cut in half
1 or 2 onions (depending on size) peeled. Leave the onions whole, but I cut an X in the top to let the onion juices out
water
salt (I don't use pepper for this)

Optional
a bunch of parsley or dill tied together

Bring to a low boil and let simmer for at least two hours. After the first hour you'll have something that looks like soup, smells like soup, and at first sip tastes like soup, but it ain't soup yet. The second hour makes the difference.

Serve with thin egg noodles or matzoh balls.

I think this might also do well as a chicken stock.
0 Replies
 
AndCalliope
 
  1  
Tue 5 Dec, 2006 02:35 pm
Leek, Potato, and Spinach Soup with Creme Fraiche
This Wolfgang Puck recipe is one of my favorites. Find it here: Leek, Potato, and Spinach Soup with Creme Fraiche

I also like this one:

Pumpkin Bisque

Ingredients

Olive oil or canola oil
1 medium white onion, diced
1 garlic clove, diced
2 C. pumpkin puree
4 C. chicken stock
Bay leaf
Pinch sugar
1/3 tsp. curry powder, or to your taste
Pinch nutmeg
2 C. Half & Half
Salt and pepper
Toasted coconut

Directions

Slowly sauté onion and garlic in oil until transparent, about 5 minutes. Add pumpkin puree and chicken stock, bay leaf, sugar, curry, nutmeg and mix well. Bring to boil, and then lower heat to simmer. Cook 20-30 minutes. Taste for seasoning. Add Half & Half and simmer another 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Blend in batches in blender. Strain through a fine strainer. Reheat gently, and serve with toasted coconut. Yield: 4 servings

This is from Recipe4Living
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Sat 16 Dec, 2006 11:01 am
joefromchicago wrote:

BARLEY SOUP WITH HAM

From the internet. This is about the only recipe that I make on a regular basis that uses allspice -- I'm usually not a big fan of it, but it tastes great in this soup.

3 tb vegetable oil
1 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, chopped
2 carrots, diced
2 ribs celery, diced
3/4 cup pearl barley
6 cups chicken broth
1 sm bay leaf
1/4 tsp ground allspice
1/2 c diced smoked ham
3 tb butter
1/2 lb fresh mushrooms, chopped
3 tsp lemon juice
1 tb fresh parsley leaves, minced

Heat oil and saute onions, celery, and carrots until softened, about 5 minutes. Raise heat to medium, stir in the garlic and saute for one more minute. Add the barley, broth, bay leaf, and allspice. Bring to a boil. Simmer, covered, for about one hour, or until the barley is tender. (The soup may be prepared in advance to this point.)

Stir the ham into the piping hot soup and let simmer while you prepare the mushrooms. Heat the butter in a small skillet, add the mushrooms and lemon juice, and stir-cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the parsley. Add the mushroom mixture to the soup and simmer for 5 minutes longer. Discard the bay leaf. Season the soup with salt and freshly- ground pepper to taste. Ladle into warmed bowls and serve immediately.


Mr B and I give two thumbs up for this one!
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Mon 18 Dec, 2006 12:09 pm
JPB wrote:
Mr B and I give two thumbs up for this one!

Glad you liked it!

Here's one of my kale soup recipes that I made this weekend:

PORTUGUESE KALE AND SAUSAGE SOUP
2 carrots, sliced
1 large onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 lb. potatoes, cubed
1/2 to 3/4 lb. Portuguese linguiça or Mexican chorizo, sliced*
1 bunch kale (about 1/2 lb), stems removed and leaves chopped
4 cups chicken stock
1 1/2 cups water
1 tbsp. olive oil

Dice 1 lb. of cubed potatoes and boil in the water until soft, about 10-15 minutes. While potatoes are boiling, in a large pot ** saute carrots, onion, and garlic in olive oil until vegetables are soft, about 5 minutes. Add remaining 1 lb. cubed potatoes, chopped kale, and chicken stock.

Transfer the boiled potatoes, along with the water, to a food processor and process until smooth. Pour the potato mixture into the pot and bring to a boil. Simmer for 30 minutes, season with salt and pepper,*** and serve.

*Some stores sell chorizo meat, which you can use in place of the sausage. If you use that, brown the meat first and then add it to the soup along with the kale and potatoes.

**Use a Dutch oven or stock pot that holds at least 8 quarts: this recipe yields a surprisingly large amount of soup.

***The original recipe calls for no spices at all. You can experiment with oregano, basil, thyme, or crushed red pepper if you'd like.
0 Replies
 
 

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