dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 04:01 pm
I do NOT think that is an accepted text.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 05:28 pm
What about Pern?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 05:43 pm
Well, as I recall, the Pern dragon thingies CAN Hover, can't they?


But it is science FICTION, or FANTASY, or some damn thing.


It is by definition not scientific.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 06:31 pm
dlowan wrote:
I do NOT think that is an accepted text.


Whaddya mean - ya don't think it's an accepted text!

Course it is, ya silly wabbit!

It's the ONLY text for some of us! We live and breathe by it. Read sections to enhance our spirits through the day. Help us to rest easily at night! Takes away all our worries and fears!

NOT ACCEPTED....Pah!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



[size=7]<this is a very convoluted bookmark!>[/size]
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 08:04 pm
http://www.nimwendil.net/images/_galeries/dragons/2006-01-14_dragonniversaire.jpg

I'll bookmark with a happy birthday dragon cake Cool
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 08:08 pm
dun good, Bethie!

Razz

Happy birthday!
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 08:24 pm
That is SOOOOOOO cute!!!!!!!


Thsnk you goils.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 09:19 pm
Pern. Well, the dragons of Pern have been corrupted by their centuries of association with humans. We should really be looking at those in their natural environment and culture.


NOT an accepted text, my bare, well, my bare rat.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 11:18 pm
roger wrote:
Pern. Well, the dragons of Pern have been corrupted by their centuries of association with humans. We should really be looking at those in their natural environment and culture.


NOT an accepted text, my bare, well, my bare rat.


I've been meaning to ask you to cover that thing for some time.


IS anyone observing dragons scientifically in their natural state?
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Aug, 2006 11:47 pm
They've lost four in a row, so they're hovering at the moment.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Aug, 2006 01:26 am
Wilso wrote:
They've lost four in a row, so they're hovering at the moment.


I think that might be shaking in their boots, rather than hovering! Twisted Evil
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Aug, 2006 01:51 am
This is bluddy FOOTBALL, isn't it?



Stop it!
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Aug, 2006 02:41 am
dlowan wrote:
This is bluddy FOOTBALL, isn't it?



Stop it!


Yes,



and No. Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Aug, 2006 02:56 am
Naomi Novik in her new Majesty's Dragon trilogy has made a number of interesting observations.

Jo Walton, Tooth and Claw has some interesting observations about a sub-genre.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Oct, 2006 05:44 am
Dragon Research Results

Dragons are an excellent species to study for the effect of climate as they occur through a huge variety of climates and altitudes, are very common and have nests that are easy to locate.

J.S. Doody and others in 2003-04, from the Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra conducted a study of Dragons nest site choices in the Australian National Botanic Gardens in Canberra and at four other locations in eastern Australia. The sites were in Cairns, Brisbane, Sydney, Canberra and the Southern Highlands. The sites vary in climatic conditions from hot tropical to cool temperate and altitudes from sea level to 1200m. The study was to examine the nest site choices and timing made by the Dragons over the range of sites, to see how the Dragons compensate for differences in climate, and yet produce the necessary mix of sexes for a viable population.

Dragon Eggs
© Nadav Pezaro
The more northern and warm the area, the earlier they nest (Nesting month, Latitudes and Altitudes shown):

* September - Cairns (16.9oS, 660 m)
* Early October - Brisbane (27.59oS, 200 m)
* Mid to late October - Sydney (33.9oS, 40 m)
* Early to mid November - Canberra (35.3oS, 660 m)
* Early December - Southern Highlands (35.8oS, 1200 m)

Nest depths: Nest depths did not vary between the sites, except for Canberra in which they were a bit deeper. The upper pivotal temperatures (temperature which contributes to the production of females) did not vary across the sites. Mean nest temperatures also did not significantly change across the sites.

They found the timing of nesting helped with the management of temperature, but not entirely. It was still hotter in Cairns in September, than it was in the Southern Highlands in December.

Nest openess: The main way they compensated for temperature differences was the 'openness' of the nesting site and hence the amount of radiation the nest would receive. This effected the mean daily range in nest temperatures rather than the mean temperature. The canopy openness was much more open at sites in the south, than those in the north. So basically, Dragons were compensating for differences in temperatures by selecting how open a nest site is, and to a lesser degree choosing when to nest.

It is hoped by studying animals whose sex are temperature dependant during incubation (TSD), will help scientists model the effects of climate change on these types of animal populations and the adjustments they are likely to make in response to global warming.
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Oct, 2006 06:26 am
you posted some pictures of dragons hoovering so I'm convinced. What other dragonian secrets do you know debs?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Oct, 2006 06:35 am
dadpad wrote:
Dragon Research Results

Dragons are an excellent species to study for the effect of climate as they occur through a huge variety of climates and altitudes, are very common and have nests that are easy to locate.

J.S. Doody and others in 2003-04, from the Institute for Applied Ecology, University of Canberra conducted a study of Dragons nest site choices in the Australian National Botanic Gardens in Canberra and at four other locations in eastern Australia. The sites were in Cairns, Brisbane, Sydney, Canberra and the Southern Highlands. The sites vary in climatic conditions from hot tropical to cool temperate and altitudes from sea level to 1200m. The study was to examine the nest site choices and timing made by the Dragons over the range of sites, to see how the Dragons compensate for differences in climate, and yet produce the necessary mix of sexes for a viable population.

Dragon Eggs
© Nadav Pezaro
The more northern and warm the area, the earlier they nest (Nesting month, Latitudes and Altitudes shown):

* September – Cairns (16.9oS, 660 m)
* Early October – Brisbane (27.59oS, 200 m)
* Mid to late October – Sydney (33.9oS, 40 m)
* Early to mid November – Canberra (35.3oS, 660 m)
* Early December – Southern Highlands (35.8oS, 1200 m)

Nest depths: Nest depths did not vary between the sites, except for Canberra in which they were a bit deeper. The upper pivotal temperatures (temperature which contributes to the production of females) did not vary across the sites. Mean nest temperatures also did not significantly change across the sites.

They found the timing of nesting helped with the management of temperature, but not entirely. It was still hotter in Cairns in September, than it was in the Southern Highlands in December.

Nest openess: The main way they compensated for temperature differences was the 'openness' of the nesting site and hence the amount of radiation the nest would receive. This effected the mean daily range in nest temperatures rather than the mean temperature. The canopy openness was much more open at sites in the south, than those in the north. So basically, Dragons were compensating for differences in temperatures by selecting how open a nest site is, and to a lesser degree choosing when to nest.

It is hoped by studying animals whose sex are temperature dependant during incubation (TSD), will help scientists model the effects of climate change on these types of animal populations and the adjustments they are likely to make in response to global warming.



Wow.


I'm impressed.


This man knows from dragons.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Oct, 2006 03:41 am
Project Title: Seasonal Physiology of the tropical dragon,
Personal Details:
Research's Name: (privacy control)
Level of Study: PhD
Contact details: (privacy control),
Charles Darwin University,
Email: privacy
Supervisors: Associate Professor (privacy control)

Research Interests:
Reptile ecology and evolution
Physiological adaptation: In particular methods by which organisms in the wet/dry tropics cope with seasonal changes in their environment.
Specific
Dynamic Action: The energetic cost(s) incurred by all organisms when assimilating a meal.

Aims:
1. To quantify any difference in the way that urban and wild populations of the dragon regulate their physiology with respect to the two tropical seasons (wet and dry) by
measuring:
a) Resting metabolic rate (RMR), standard metabolic rate (SMR) and the postprandial rise in metabolism due to feeding, also known as Specific Dynamic Action (SDA), using flowthrough respirometry.
b) Evaporative Waterloss (EWL) using a flowthrough humidity system.
c) Digestive Efficiency (DE) using bomb calorimetry.
2. To determine the cues and timing of metabolic depression.
3. To determine the extent to which any variation in the way that the different populations of regulate their physiology seasonally is the result of evolution or individual plasticity (acclimatization).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Nothing on hovering though.

(Guess whos dicovered google scholar?) Very Happy
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 05:07 pm
Since Dragons have two legs, two arms AND two wings, and no other backboned animal on this planet now, or in the fossil record, has that configuration, it's clear that Dragons did not evolve on Earth.

Because of this, any resemblance to reptiles or dinosaurs is purely coincidental. We also can not assume that dragon physiology and genetics are in any way similar to earthly biology.

In Roger Zelazney's _Roadmarks_, the Dragons of Bel'Quinith were beings of almost supernatural power. For them, asking if a dragon can hover would be like asking if Picasso can color between the lines.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 27 Nov, 2006 07:26 pm
rosborne979 wrote:
Since Dragons have two legs, two arms AND two wings, and no other backboned animal on this planet now, or in the fossil record, has that configuration, it's clear that Dragons did not evolve on Earth.

Because of this, any resemblance to reptiles or dinosaurs is purely coincidental. We also can not assume that dragon physiology and genetics are in any way similar to earthly biology.

In Roger Zelazney's _Roadmarks_, the Dragons of Bel'Quinith were beings of almost supernatural power. For them, asking if a dragon can hover would be like asking if Picasso can color between the lines.


So....CAN Picasso colour between the lines?
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Can Dragons Hover?
  3. » Page 2
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/23/2019 at 07:59:22