7
   

Vanishing Languages

 
 
steissd
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 May, 2003 02:41 pm
One more question: the word "German" pertaining to the language, existed before the German Empire was declared. So, in which kingdoms, princedoms and duchys did the people speak it?
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2003 06:37 am
Wow! fbaezer. You need to change your name to Captain from Castile Razz
Thanks for the information.
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2003 08:30 am
Speaking of vanishing.... This is odd. Excuse the interruption, but I am testing something.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2003 08:32 am
Happend to me as well, Letty - with the only difference that my response completely disappeared!
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2003 08:35 am
Testing- 1-2-3-4
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2003 08:36 am
Walter, I have a Yahoo account, and that may have been the problem. If I went into A2K from my favorites, everything was fine. Well, it's back to normal now.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2003 08:39 am
Seems to be Ok!
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2003 08:43 am
Okay, I'm trying to write it again.

steissd:

'German' was first mentioned in a "notable" way by naming king Ludwig II. Ludwig den Deutschen), (L. the German), ca. 805-876
King (König) after 843. Son of Ludwig I, whom he deposed
.
Quote:
The Carolingian Empire was based on an alliance between the emperor, who was a temporal ruler supported by a military retinue, and the pope of the Roman Catholic Church, who granted spiritual sanction to the imperial mission. Charlemagne and his son Louis I ( 814-40) established centralized authority, appointed imperial counts as administrators, and developed a hierarchical feudal structure headed by the emperor. Reliant on personal leadership rather than the Roman concept of legalistic government, Charlemagne's empire lasted less than a century.

A period of warfare followed the death of Louis. The Treaty of Verdun (843) restored peace and divided the empire among three sons, geographically and politically delineating the approximate future territories of Germany, France, and the area between them, known as the Middle Kingdom . The eastern Carolingian kings ruled the East Frankish Kingdom, what is now Germany and Austria; the western Carolingian kings ruled the West Frankish Kingdom, what became France. The imperial title, however, came to depend increasingly on rule over the Middle Kingdom. By this time, in addition to a geographical and political delineation, a cultural and linguistic split had occurred. The eastern Frankish tribes still spoke Germanic languages; the language of the western Frankish tribes, under the influence of Gallo-Latin, had developed into Old French. Because of these linguistic differences, the Treaty of Verdun had to be written in two languages.
source: own summary from various history books.
.

People living in France and having French as "mothertongue", may speak as well (a few 'only'): Flemish, Basque, Bretonnic, Alsacian, ... ... .


Perhaps, you use the above given link(s) and/or google to find more.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2003 02:17 am
Cool site of the day, re: languages:
http://www.ethnologue.com/web.asp
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 May, 2003 04:38 am
nimh, I'm certainly glad that fbaezer suggested I start this thread. Glad it made you smile today. Smile

I really was quite taken with all the educational contributions.
0 Replies
 
mutwillig hexe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 11:24 am
dying languages
yes languages are dying for example the german language is slowly becoming more english in 2 or so years the present german will be very out of date the es set or schafes ess will be being phased out as we speak and who knows wen the oomlaut will head south.
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 11:37 am
Hey, mutwillig. Welcome to A2K and thanks for your input. Wow! This thread is around a year old. Shocked I had to go back and reread it.
0 Replies
 
mutwillig hexe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 11:40 am
thnx
as a german student i hear things for example there is no official geramn word for internet and of course i think german is great language to screamin.
btw my name if you just look up both words in a dictionary means wanton witch
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 11:49 am
Wanton witch. <smile> That brings back some memories for me. Hmmmm. So that's where the word "hex" comes from. Well, English is a pretty good language to scream in, also.

Ain't onomatopoeias marvelous things? --a language unto itself.
0 Replies
 
urs53
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 03:33 pm
Hexe, no, we will never kill our 'Umlaut'! It is just too funny to make English speaking people say things like 'Schnäuzchen' (which of course also has the 'ch' sound...).

Letty, I think any language is good to scream in :-) Not that I scream too often... Anyway...
0 Replies
 
urs53
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 03:34 pm
Oh, sorry, I forgot - welcome to A2K, Hexe!

BTW, in correct German, your name should be 'Mutwillige Hexe' but I like Mutwillig Hexe also :-)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 03:36 pm
Quote:
Hexe, no, we will never kill our 'Umlaut'! It is just too funny to make English speaking people say things like 'Schnäuzchen' (which of course also has the 'ch' sound...).


Especially, since you can get now webaddresses wth the Umlaut as well ... like "schätzchen.urs.at.schwäbele.de" Laughing
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 03:37 pm
Nor I, Urs. Isn't there a theory that language began with onomatopoeias? I need to look that up.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 03:42 pm
Letty wrote:
Nor I, Urs. Isn't there a theory that language began with onomatopoeias? I need to look that up.


Nice essay here:
Quote:
This paper is a brief phonetic investigation of the nature of onomatopoeia. Onomatopoeia is the imitation of natural noises by speech sounds. To understand this phenomenon, we must realize that there is a problem here which is by no means trivial. There is an infinite number of noises in nature, but only twenty-something letters in an alphabet that convey in any language a closed system of about fifty (up to a maximum of 100) speech sounds. I have devoted a book length study to the expressiveness of language (What Makes Sound Patterns Expressive? -- The Poetic Mode of Speech Perception), but have only fleetingly touched upon onomatopoeia. In this paper I will recapitulate from that book the issue of acoustic coding, and then will toy around with two specific cases: why does the cuckoo say "kuku" in some languages, and why the clock prefers to say "tick-tock" rather than, say, tip-top. Only fleetingly I will touch upon the question why the speech sounds [s] and [S] (S represents the initial consonant of shoe; s the initial consonant of sue) serve generally as onomatopoeia for noise (in my book I have explored the expressiveness of these sounds at much greater length). By way of doing all this, I will discuss a higher-order issue as well: How are effects translated from reality to some semiotic system, or from one semiotic system to another.

Onomatopoeia: Cuckoo-Language and Tick-Tocking - The Constraints of Semiotic Systems
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2004 03:50 pm
Thanks, Walter. I knew the theory that language developed from onomatopoeias was flawed. When I took linguistics, they also cited examples of dog talk, i.e. bow wow. What does a dog say in German?
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, EVERYONE! - Discussion by OmSigDAVID
WIND AND WATER - Discussion by Setanta
Who ordered the construction of the Berlin Wall? - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
True version of Vlad Dracula, 15'th century - Discussion by gungasnake
ONE SMALL STEP . . . - Discussion by Setanta
History of Gun Control - Discussion by gungasnake
Where did our notion of a 'scholar' come from? - Discussion by TuringEquivalent
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 07/06/2022 at 01:59:26