12
   

A Digression Thread: or old furniture in a new house.

 
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 05:28 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Doonesbury, not Queensbury. Reading skills are appreciated


Oh.


Picky.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 05:30 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:

I should do a lot of things..


So should we all. Or not. some of us should probably do a lot less things.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 05:39 pm
@dlowan,
I mae some pork chops tonite. They were fried in butter I sprinkled a bit of a private bbq rub (made without cumin but heavy on the garlic foenogreek, paprika nd teeny bit 5 spice. It was moist and nicely done an the taste was super. Mrs F made asparagus and baked us some smallish orange sweet taters (which we eat like a baked potato with butter ).

now I need something really schlecky for dessert. we have dessert as an evening treat at round eightish.
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 05:40 pm
@dlowan,
Quote:
Picky

I still have my hasenpfeffer recipes around hare
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 07:02 pm
@farmerman,
Isn't sweet potato sweet enough to be dessert?


How much sweeter than sweet potato does something have to be in order to qualify as a dessert?
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 07:03 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Quote:
Picky

I still have my hasenpfeffer recipes around hare


And I'm still not a hare.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 07:23 pm
@dlowan,
I've had half-yams for breakfast several times in the last bunch of months. Roasted and so on, frozen, thawed, micro'd w tad of butter.

A little sweet in the morning is good..

breakfast can be dessert, I insist.
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 08:28 pm
@ossobuco,
In the US, at least in parts thereof, it can! I remember staying in Washington DC and the only breakfast offered in this bed and breakfast (in most countries they offer a real variety of different breakfast options as part of the tariff) was some kind of sweet muffiny thing. It has a special name but I forget it.

They weren't super super sweet, but to me they were like big cupcakes. The hostess insisted they were proper breakfast food and wasn't prepared to offer a healthier option. I'm rarely a breakfast eater so it was no big deal to me, but if you were used to, say, English B and B's and planned to use breakfast as your main meal of the day, and felt the way I do about cupcakes for breakfast, I imagine you'd be very grumpy indeed.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 08:29 pm
@ossobuco,
Sweet potato is relatively low GI so it makes good sense as a breakfast food. Also very good for tummy problems, my vet tells me!
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2015 08:51 pm
@dlowan,
Italy was routinely like that - the average non high end place would offer a roll , butter patty, and maybe jam, and pretty good coffee and hot milk on the side.
I learned to request no breakfast when setting up my last trips, as that saved dollars, back then. As it happened, a friend of a friend 's mate owned a lot of breakfast and bar concessions in Florence. At least back then, you could say no; I don't know about now. I like nosing around in a city for pastry shops and coffee bars.

That was for fellow italians too. The whole breakfast extravaganza thing would tend to be at tourist places. Maybe my best extravaganza breakfast ever was in Mexico - not just all the fruit, but how wonderful it was.

Aside from tourist breakfasts like that one in Mexico, besides Italy I've traveled similarly spare in the morning in the U.S., except that the muffin is worse and the coffee arguably a blank.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2015 12:23 am
@ossobuco,
British B and B breakfasts are terrifying!

Cereal, toast, porridge, bacon and eggs...usually with sausages and baked beans.....and they think you will eat the cereals AND the bacon and eggs.

I thought I might try doing that and go all day on that food to save money, because I was already paying for it, but I just can't stomach food like that in the morning. Can't even look at it!
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2015 07:13 am
You need a hare of the dog that bit ya . . .

I loved the Irish breakfast, much as you described, but without the baked beans. I couldn't eat their bacon rashers, though.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2015 07:51 am
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:

British B and B breakfasts are terrifying!
That certainly depends where you are staying (and about what period).
Back in the 60's and 70's, I experienced the same (and like it, because it was so different to everything I knew).
When we stayed in B&B's the last years, we got more the continental stuff - cheeses, hams, homemade jams and marmalade, various rolls and croissants etc with a choice of having additionally an "English breakfast".
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2015 09:42 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I always hated the "full Breakfast" because I was never a fan of brit or Irish "bacon"(its a salty ham to me) or the concept of fried eggs done well before hand, cool toast where butter doesn't melt, and fried tomatoes.(what's that about")<
I think , if given a choice between a brit / Irish breakfast or a bad American one, Id rather eat something as gross as grits


ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2015 11:12 am
My strong impression re Italy as I knew it, also Mexico, was that mid day meals were the main ones, so that breakfast was just that, breaking a fast, and not so much of a deal. Similarly, evening meals were often less bountiful spreads than the mid day meal. I think in the large metro areas where people no longer all go home for mama's lunch/siesta there may be more variation now.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2015 12:06 pm
@ossobuco,
Traditionally, in many European the midday meal traditionally has been the main meal - and still is on Sundays and when people are at home or on holidays.

Have breakfast like an emperor, lunch like a king and dinner like a beggar has been a saying in Germany.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2015 05:02 pm
I like purple flowers, personally . . . . but i digress . . . and you should, too . . .
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jan, 2015 10:23 pm
@farmerman,
Now why are Americans so opposed to fried tomatoes?
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2015 02:32 am
@Wilso,
I thought they loved fried green ones? But don't they crumb them or something?

Personally, I do not like grilled tomatoes much.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jan, 2015 02:35 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

dlowan wrote:

British B and B breakfasts are terrifying!
That certainly depends where you are staying (and about what period).
Back in the 60's and 70's, I experienced the same (and like it, because it was so different to everything I knew).
When we stayed in B&B's the last years, we got more the continental stuff - cheeses, hams, homemade jams and marmalade, various rolls and croissants etc with a choice of having additionally an "English breakfast".


They were still serving the full catastrophe when we were in England and Scotland in late 2010. I didn't like what I saw of the German breakfast in places in Berlin. I don't remember what there was much, but I know I didn't eat any of it.
0 Replies
 
 

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