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History Mysteries

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 09:28 am
Where did the name "Easter" come from?

(It's NOT from a Germanic god "Osteria" - that has been a nice invention of a monk in the 9th century.)
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 09:35 am
Good grief, Walter. From Western Civ to etymology. Smile

Found this on the web:

http://www.celtic-catholic-church.org/oak_tree/easter.html
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 10:26 am
That's nice of you to say, Letty, but sadly untrue. I appreciate poetry, particularly songs.

Shocking about the Easter etymology. Though I'm confused as to whether to blame a 9th c. monk, or a 19th century pagan apologist. Can we have the eggs and the bunnies explained now? The chocolate makes perfect sense!

I have made up my Easter baskets, btw. I am the Easter Bunny in this house! One for each of my kids and one for my S.U. which includes the biggest, fanciest chocolate rabbit I could find. It looks like this, but the 40 oz. size which stands more than a foot tall. D'ya think he'll share?

http://dilettante.com/graphics/store/items/141.jpg
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 10:40 am
Hey, Piffka,

It takes a poet to appreciate a poet. Smile

I must share with you an Easter bunny favorite of my as told to me by my sister.

A health care colleague of my sister was required by the state to visit homes that were designated as poverty stricken. In one of the homes that she visited, one of the children ran up to her and asked that if they went to Sunday school on Easter, would they receive an Easter basket.
The health worker, upon her return to home base, immediately went out and bought seven Easter baskets, one for each child in the family.

She then made a special trip to the home and was greeted by the same child, who upon spying the baskets screamed to the other kids:

Hey, younguns. Look at this. She's bought every one of us a "God Damn" Easter basket. Somehow, that truly affected me as the real meaning of Easter, and as I think about it, a genuine smile of the heart.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 10:50 am
Eating a chocolate bunny which may have been a chocolate santa before (or even a chocolate-bunny-santa-bunny-santa regarding the taste of it), I'll send my best wishes for a happy Easter!
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 11:02 am
Letty! God-damn, what a story!!! Laughing


Walter -- Thanks! Happy Easter to you and to everyone here! Let all your Chocolate Bunnies be solid ones!

(I'm sorry that your chocolate doesn't taste so good. I thought you had great chocolate in Germany?? -- at least you don't have to suffer through any Peeps!)
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 11:06 am
Certainly we have great chocolates, but this definately was a bunny from last year - or, it has been a punishment, since it's still Lent :wink: .
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 11:09 am
Piff


For shame.

Peeps are my favorite.

I like 'em stale.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 11:19 am
Ever tried one of these, Frank?http://www.schulz.ch/images/Valentin/Osterhasen.jpg
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 01:34 pm
nazca lines
Very Happy hi Piffka - there was a really interesting programme about the Nazca lines on the BBC about a year ago.

Their theory was that the Nazca people had been weavers and therefore had a good understanding of grids/patterns/reproducing designs to a larger scale. Their theory was that the designs were walked as part of a religious ritual. Don't ask why! Shocked

Erich von Daniken of course thought they were messages to spaceships ...
0 Replies
 
Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 01:37 pm
letty
hi letty - who was the book by - i would be interested to read it? Smile
0 Replies
 
Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Apr, 2003 07:24 am
hi letty - using photoshop and a scanner. I scan in bits and pieces of various sketches and paintings and recombine them to create something totally different (and the colours are different as well) - they have many many layers before i finish them. I always have a mood or feeling in mind that i am working to create. Some are autobiographical and part of a story sequence - like the juggling hand - it was about a time when i was holding down a part time job, doing my degree and attempting to cope with home and family - it was a poor me piece about losing the plot!
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Apr, 2003 07:56 am
Good morning, Vivien.

I have the book here somewhere, but I'll have to search it out. Thanks for your explanation of how you create your art. Amazing age we live in.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2003 10:51 am
Check this out: (history, but no longer a mystery)

http://www.able2know.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=6785&highlight=

Shocked
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Apr, 2003 11:43 am
Hey, Vivien. I finally found the book. To Prove a Villain was co-authored by Taylor Littleton and Robert R. Rea of Auburn University. In included several authors and their contributions, one of which included Josephine Tey's The Daughter of Time. That's a college text book for 'ya. Smile
0 Replies
 
bobsmyth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Apr, 2003 06:57 pm
History Mysteries
Here's a mystery re: Bermuda triangle. Missing flight during good weather about a half century ago. This is followed by missing search plane trying to find them. Mysterious message from search -- don't follow us. No evidence turns up on search. No debris. Nothing except original flight seemed disoriented.

Fast forward to article in paper maybe a year ago saying plane found identified by serial number. Nothing since. What happened?
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Apr, 2003 07:08 pm
Hi, Bob. Welcome to A2K. There's no doubt that the triangle is intriguing. If I recall correctly, the squadron leader said something about "white water" and spinning compasses. Perhaps there was a magnetic eerieness, or perhaps it was just a fluke.
0 Replies
 
bobsmyth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Apr, 2003 08:04 pm
History Mysteries
Flight 19 disappeared December 5, 1945 5 TBM Avengers on a routine training mission. A Martin flying boat was the search plane. No oil slicks no debris found during search. There was a newspapaer report of finding one of the original planes and then all information ceased.
0 Replies
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 May, 2003 04:32 am
Bob, If I were an aeronautical engineer, I might offer a reasonable explanation for what exactly happened. ...but, since I don't have a clue, I better leave it to you. Clive Cussler's books were so enjoyable to me, cause he always explained all these unusual happenings. and he always made his case so believable. I recall the first book that I read by him. Raise the Titanic. Smile Fun, ain't it? Cool
0 Replies
 
bobsmyth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 May, 2003 10:09 am
History Mysteries
Hi Letty

It is indeed. I remeber a story from The People's Almanac published 1975 in which there was an account of a seaman during the whaling era swallowed by the whale and upon cutting it apart the seaman was found still alive in it's belly. Research showed later that all the crew were intact and it was a hoax. Funny world we've got.

Bob
0 Replies
 
 

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