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History Mysteries

 
 
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 07:34 am
Gorsh, Joanne. Loved that link. The Bermuda Triangle has been the subject of many a book and TV show. Folks just love to wonder about things, don't they. Smile
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oldandknew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 07:54 am
Twinkle twinkle little star, how I wonder what you are.
And don't forget Letty, curiosoity killed the cat
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 08:05 am
Indeed, John, but also bear in mind that moggies have nine lives and also land on their feet when tossed about by man or nature. Smile
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Letty
 
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Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 11:54 am
Shocked Good grief. Another mystery concerning the man who is famous for tales of the Arabesque:

http://channels.netscape.com/ns/news/package.jsp?name=news/edgarallanpoe/edgarallanpoe




Hey Craven! look at this!
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 03:07 pm
One of the many mysteries in European history has been the actual place of the Varus Battle.

Arminius (c. 18 BC- AD 19), chief of the Cherusci, a Teutonic tribe inhabiting parts of what is now Germany. German nationalists of the 19th century celebrated him as a national hero, under the name of Hermann, for having freed Germany from Roman control. He served in the Roman army (AD 1-6), obtaining Roman citizenship and an insight into the arts of war and policy as practised by the Romans. Returning home about AD 7, he found his people oppressed by the Roman governor Publius Quinctilius Varus. Arminius organized a rebellion of the Cherusci, annihilating three Roman legions in the Varus Battle or Battle of Teutoburg Forest in AD 9 and forcing the Romans back to the Rhine. The defeat of his legions led Varus to commit suicide.
[ A link to the Varus Disaster ]

What the Romans "thought" abou this:
(Augustus is said to have called: 'Quinctili Vare, legiones redde !' = "Varus, give back my legions".)

excerpt from: Gaius Velleus Paterculus: Roman History



Although, the place of the battle is now considered to be near the town of Osnabrück rather than close to the place of the memorial [no historian ever believed that!], the meorial and it's history is quite interesting:

http://www.hermannsdenkmal.de/_borders/Hermann.JPG


History of the "Hermannsdenkmal"
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2003 07:58 am
Good grief, Walter. I felt that I was back in Western Civ class. Amazing information and the picture was awesome. Thanks.
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oldandknew
 
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Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2003 09:10 am
Statue statue on the plinth
Letty Letty had a glimce
That ancient relic that she saw
Filled her head with mystic awe
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2003 09:23 am
and it's no longer a mystery.
The oakman knows his history.

When I peer inside that tree,
A budding poet speaks to me.

Laughing Very Happy Smile Cool

John, what of the enigma of the missing Dauphin of France?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1841155888/026-6891259-3290863
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oldandknew
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2003 09:28 am
The Dolphin of France, latterly known as the Ancient Mariner. His favorite expression was "walk the plank".. He was also an Olympic breast stroke swimmer.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2003 09:33 am
Laughing John, when I was a kid and read Huck Finn, I really thought Twain had misspelled dolphin. Smile Funnnnneeeeeeee.Thanks for the laugh.
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oldandknew
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2003 09:36 am
No sweat. I was just tunaing up your laughter buds
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2003 11:29 am
tuna? Sorry Charlie. Smile
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Vivien
 
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Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2003 03:42 pm
history mystery
what about the princes in the tower and Richard III?

The only evidence for Richard being 'evil' and having murdered them comes from the Shakespeare play - Shakespeare was writing for a Tudor monarch. The painting that shows him with a hunch back was altered by the Tudors to show this.

In actual fact, Richard had a vested interest in keeping the boys alive as he only ruled during their lifetime, on their death the succession went elsewhere.

On Richards death the monks at Durham wrote 'this day is most grieviously slain our beloved king' - no need to write this after his death unless they meant it.

good book on the subject: The daughter of time by Josphine Tey
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oldandknew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2003 04:03 pm
Well that's soap operas for you Vivien. Not nearly as bad as Eastenders tho
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2003 04:05 pm
Vivien, welcome to A2K. Marvelous,Vivien. I totally agree. The bard was a politician to rival all politicians as was Alexander Pope ( or so I have read). A book that my daughter was required to read in college, was the book "To Prove a Villain". I was very impressed and did a double take on the entire play. Whatever or whoever William Shakespeare might have been, he still wields a powerful influence to those who are interested enough to read the plays, and to digest them.

And, we are still trying to prove villains, are we not?
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2003 04:09 pm
John, you a Brit and comparing the bard to a soap? Oh, my goodness. Another icon smashed to bits in the East end. Razz
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Piffka
 
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Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2003 05:01 pm
There are a lots of mysteries I'd like cleared up... first -- "The Problem of the Picts" the ancient tribes of Scotland -- who were they, where were they from and what did their stone carvings and writings mean?

Where did the Hopi Indians really start when they began their journeys to the four corners of the world?

How did the Egyptians made their pyramids?

Machu Picchu -- how old, how made, etc.?

The designs on the Nazca plain of South America -- who made them and why?

What about Easter Island and all those giant stone heads?

I'd also like to know if Natalie Wood was murdered, why and how?

Is that enough? I could probably think of a dozen more! Smile
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2003 05:18 pm
Piffka, and in keeping with the season, Easter Island. Smile
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2003 05:26 pm
Well, Piffka, Let's you and I resolve to keep the mystery of life on the front burner..................................................................

You are a poet of the first order, Piffka...and all poets are a part of mystery.
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Apr, 2003 06:45 am
Vivien, I just looked at your digital art. Very unusual and also mysterious. How is that done, exactly?
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