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The Crack that Lets the Light In

 
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jun, 2022 06:12 am
Do they still market Near Beer? What a fraud that was. Didn't taste like any beer I used to drink.
mesquite
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Jun, 2022 03:08 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
Do they still market Near Beer? What a fraud that was. Didn't taste like any beer I used to drink.

Sure, there are plenty out there now. Finding a nonalcoholic atheist beer might be more of a challenge though. I haven't tried any , but some of the more flavorful craft varieties may be more tasty.

https://www.liquor.com/thmb/bdw5JDXceRun8vV6fVtDj8KCd04=/665x0/filters:no_upscale():max_bytes(150000):strip_icc():format(webp)/LIQUORS-10-best-nonalcoholic-beers-5078321-d4c79d1bcd6c45b2b266f48bc8ac8b1a.jpg
Quote:
Not long ago, there were just a couple of nonalcoholic beer brands on the market, none of which offered much in the way of flavor or style diversity. Now, big-box brands and craft breweries are getting into the game, pumping out NA options including lagers, IPAs and stouts.

"With little to no innovation within the nonalcoholic beer category over the past few decades, this poses an exciting opportunity for brewers," says Golden Road Brewing general manager Dan Hamill. "How can we bring full flavor to a historically bland product?"

The near-beer market in America is still relatively small, but experts see a lot of room for growth. "The current NA space is 1% of the U.S. beer industry," he says. "But NA beer is expected to grow by double digits in the next few years with recent trends in health and wellness."/quote]
https://www.liquor.com/best-nonalcoholic-beers-5078321
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Jun, 2022 03:48 pm
I had quit looking because I no longer crave any of the stuff.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jul, 2022 06:19 am
The famous first released Webb photo.
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FXazrAmWAAEP0Xe?format=jpg&name=large
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jul, 2022 10:09 am
The title of the video is close to being clickbait, but the images here are worth your time.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Jul, 2022 08:13 am
I'm no scientist but I find this video intriguing.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2022 08:01 pm
Asked facetiously today on Twitter

Atheists, if Jesus isn’t real, then how did Da Vinci paint The Last Supper?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Aug, 2022 09:25 pm
@edgarblythe,
That was just some guy with the same name.
0 Replies
 
ascribbler
 
  0  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2022 01:39 am
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
Atheists, if Jesus isn’t real, then how did Da Vinci paint The Last Supper?


Leonardo invented the sfumato technique blurring the lines of reality as Jesus was the image of his father.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Aug, 2022 01:01 pm
@ascribbler,
'Twas a joke.
ascribbler
 
  0  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 01:53 am
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
'Twas a joke.


Oh, ok, facetious, I get it now.

Where better to cloak a joke than in a soteriological discussion of the impossible.

edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Aug, 2022 07:34 am
@ascribbler,
Such is social media.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Sep, 2022 02:30 pm
ascribbler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Sep, 2022 05:49 am
@edgarblythe,
Is secular humanism naught but anthropic chauvinism?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Oct, 2022 08:47 pm
Frans de Waal - Public Page
·
The Gendered Ape, Essay #6
THOSE EMBARRASSING BONOBOS!
It’s not always easy to talk about bonobos at academic gatherings. There is no issue with fellow primatologists, who are used to straightforward descriptions of sexual behavior and know the recent evidence. But it’s different with people outside my field, such as anthropologists, philosophers, or psychologists. They become fidgety, scratch their heads, snicker, or adopt a puzzled look. Why do bonobos stump them?
Photograph: Of all the great apes, the bonobo is built most like our ancestors, including relatively long legs and the shape of their feet. Here standing upright, an adult female (left) and an adolescent male. Since bonobos are genetically equally close to us as chimpanzees, they deserve the same attention in relation to human evolution. Photograph by Frans de Waal.
One reason for the discomfort is excessive shyness about erotic behavior, which bonobos exhibit in all positions that we can imagine, and even some that we can’t. Moreover, these apes do it in all partner combinations. People assume that animals use sex only for reproduction, but I estimate that three-quarters of bonobo sex has nothing to do with it.
But there is a deeper reason why bonobos are the black sheep of our extended family despite being as close to us as chimpanzees. They fail to conform to the traditional model of the human ancestor. Most evolutionary scenarios of our species stress male bonding, male dominance, hunting, aggression, and territorial warfare. This is how our species conquered the earth, it is thought.
Chimpanzee behavior, which can be quite violent, lends support to this narrative. This ape is therefore happily embraced as a model. The peaceful, female-dominated bonobo, on the other hand, doesn’t fit. The species is sidelined, such as in “The Better Angels of Our Nature,” in which Steven Pinker calls bonobos “very strange primates.” And Richard Wrangham, in “The Goodness Paradox,” portrays them as an evolutionary offshoot, who “have gone their separate way.” In other words, bonobos may be delightful apes, they are bizarre and irrelevant. Let’s just ignore them!
According to pioneering fieldworker Takayoshi Kano and his students, bonobo groups in the forest regularly “mingle” and “fuse” without any fighting. They share food between communities and occasionally adopt orphaned youngsters from their neighbors. All of this presents a huge contrast with chimpanzees, which know only various degrees of hostility between communities.
My own studies made matters worse by describing bonobos as polyamorous flower children. Intense erotic contact, known as GG-rubbing, is common among females. It allows them to form the powerful sisterhood that is the glue of their society.
Since the species has thrown a huge wrench into popular origin myths, we see regular attempts to revise our views, such as when journalists or political pundits tout observations of bonobo aggression and predation. Unfortunately for them, predation means very little. In biology, it falls under feeding behavior, not aggression. Anyone who has been chased by a bull realizes that a species’ diet says little about its aggressiveness.
But it’s true that bonobos occasionally fight. In fact, their extensive sexual activity would make no sense if their society were free of social tensions. The main purpose of this activity is to keep the peace. “Make love - not war” is a bonobo slogan.
Until now, however, there is not a single observation of one bonobo killing another, neither in captivity nor in the wild. A recent count of lethal aggression among bonobos and chimpanzees in Africa listed 152 incidents. Of those, only 1 concerned bonobos, and this was a suspected killing, not an observed case. All other cases concerned chimpanzees.
Bonobos may be genetically equally close to us as chimpanzees, but anatomically they are more like us. Harold Coolidge, the American anatomist who gave the bonobo its species status, already concluded in 1933 from his dissection of a bonobo corpse that this ape “may approach more closely to the common ancestor of chimpanzees and man than does any living chimpanzee.”
I had to think of this when “Ardi” was discovered, a 4.4 million-year-old Ardipithecus fossil from Ethiopia. Her unusually small blunted canine teeth indicated that she was relatively peaceful. The discoverers could only think of chimpanzees as a comparison, however, when they concluded that Ardi’s physique set her apart from her ape forebears. As usual, the bonobo was overlooked.
With their long legs and frequent upright gait, however, bonobos resemble our immediate ancestors more than any other living ape. Not only does Ardi look very much like an upright bonobo, her assumed peacefulness also brings bonobos to mind.
But we’ll have to wait for a new generation of anthropologists before they will dare to contemplate that perhaps we descend not from a blustering chimp-like ancestor but from a gentle, empathic bonobo-like ape.
FURTHER
Commentary on a revisionist 2007 New Yorker article that tried to spin-doctor bonobos into aggressive apes: www.skeptic.com/eskeptic/07-08-08/
Anatomical comparison between bonobos and human ancestors by Adrienne Zihlman et al. (1978): www.nature.com/articles/275744a0
Lethal aggression among wild apes analyzed by Michael Wilson et al. (2014): www.nature.com/articles/nature13727
For further details and references to the literature, read “Different: Gender Through the Eyes of a Primatologist” (Norton, 2022). A video about the book can be seen here: https://fb.watch/ffbauZBzNb/
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Oct, 2022 07:10 am
https://scontent-hou1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t39.30808-6/311435848_5647752631928342_8782144361534304278_n.jpg?_nc_cat=108&ccb=1-7&_nc_sid=5cd70e&_nc_ohc=jK3Q7neoFJIAX8-uo_U&_nc_ht=scontent-hou1-1.xx&oh=00_AT89TOaA8sLOPZzLSllHGhiiTB2EQ-kMTEsWcjR4ZNeTqg&oe=634EC314
0 Replies
 
Yalow
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2022 04:48 pm
"For that again, is what all manner of religion essentially is: childish dependency."
- Albert Ellis
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Oct, 2022 08:44 am
Would you want to live forever?

Most people I read claim they would not wish to live forever. Meaning, to me, they grow tired of the struggle and surrender to death. I look on us as blooming the way flowers do, then wilting away. It can be rather poetic. I don't look forward to it, but the inevitability means I should be accepting - but only after living the longest, fullest, span I can manage.
Yalow
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2022 04:36 pm
@edgarblythe,
I don't know. I will have to think about it. But there must be a time when you get bored, when nothing is interesting to you anymore. But for a long time, you have the freedom to learn about so many things!
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2022 06:06 pm
@Yalow,
At this point I want to go on forever. Who knows how I will feel in coming years?
0 Replies
 
 

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