23
   

Monitoring Biden and other Contemporary Events

 
 
MontereyJack
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 28 Feb, 2021 11:11 pm
@oralloy,
Nixon was0 told by republicans, who spearheaded the investigation, that he would be convicted if he didn't resign. so he resigned. that was of course back in the days when some republicans had spines and moral compasses those days are gone. And why don't you remember, while we're at it, 1992, 1996. 2008, 2012, 2016, 2018, and 2020 m in all of which dems won the vote
MontereyJack
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 28 Feb, 2021 11:15 pm
@MontereyJack,
yes, 2016, trump lost the vote by nearly three million. the large majority of americans will not vote for him. 2024 if he runs will be another debacle for him.
Builder
 
  4  
Reply Sun 28 Feb, 2021 11:49 pm
@MontereyJack,
One state was responsible for the three million votes for Clinton.

California is just one state in the "united" states of America.

snood
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 01:29 am
@Builder,
Let’s say that is true. Are Californians unworthy somehow to cast those three million votes?
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 01:56 am
The senate parliamentarian unilaterally decided that a $15 minimum wage would not be included in the Covid relief bill.

Did you know that in 2001, the Republicans fired the sitting senate parliamentarian in order to pass their tax cuts?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/2001/05/08/key-senate-official-loses-job-in-dispute-with-gop/e2310021-0f14-4667-a261-54e6c033207c/

Democrats play too ******* nice.

0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  4  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 02:40 am
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:
oralloy wrote:
I'm always quick to admit it when someone shows that I am wrong.

No you're not. People repeatedly prove you're wrong and you keep repeating the wrongs.

That's a lie. You cannot provide any examples of such a thing happening.

This is just another one of your phony claims that you can't back up.
oralloy
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 02:41 am
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:
Nixon was told by republicans, who spearheaded the investigation, that he would be convicted if he didn't resign. so he resigned.

The Republicans of the day were naive and unprepared for how evil progressives are.

It was a mark of shame that they went along with the witch hunt.


MontereyJack wrote:
that was of course back in the days when some republicans had spines and moral compasses those days are gone.

Ascribing a moral compass to people for going along with progressive evil is pretty Orwellian.


MontereyJack wrote:
And why don't you remember, while we're at it, 1992, 1996. 2008, 2012, 2016, 2018, and 2020 m in all of which dems won the vote

Your denial of the 2016 results makes it OK for Mr. Trump to deny the 2020 results.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 02:42 am
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:
yes, 2016, trump lost the vote by nearly three million. the large majority of americans will not vote for him. 2024 if he runs will be another debacle for him.

Come 2024 the nation will be weary of President Carter Biden and his neverending failure.
MontereyJack
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 03:39 am
@Builder,
California also has a population that is the same as the combined population of twenty-two smaller states. ALL the states had votes for clinton, so if ccalifornia's votealone is greater than the margin, that statistic is irrlevant, all contributed to the total, and CA is just bigger.
0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 03:42 am
@oralloy,
We have done so repkeatedly, and, as you are doing here, you ignore it and pretend we haven't. You're a faker.
MontereyJack
 
  0  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 03:47 am
@oralloy,
Well, so far he's beating the **** out of trump's chaotic attempts to get vaccines actually available and in people's arms. And it looks like he's gonna get the extremely publicly popular stimulus bill through, even if it takes a strictly party line vote. And the public will love him for it. trump's fair on his way to be a washed-up has-been. And that's in only a month.
oralloy
 
  6  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 05:13 am
@MontereyJack,
Don't be silly. Mr. Trump did far better at releasing the vaccines than Mr. Biden is doing.

And a lone stimulus bill is hardly going to see Mr. Biden to victory after four years of failure.
oralloy
 
  6  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 05:17 am
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:
We have done so repeatedly,

No you haven't. That's why you can't provide any examples of such a thing ever happening.


MontereyJack wrote:
and, as you are doing here, you ignore it and pretend we haven't.

No pretending on my end. You're the one who isn't able to produce any examples to back up your phony claims.


MontereyJack wrote:
You're a faker.

Nope. I can actually provide cites to back up all my claims.

You are the one who can't back up anything that he says.
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 07:11 am
Covid-19: Was US vaccine rollout a 'dismal failure' under Trump?
By Jake Horton
BBC Reality Check

President Joe Biden has pledged to boost the rollout of Covid vaccines in the US, and has criticised the speed of the operation under the previous administration.

It's been "a dismal failure thus far," the president said after taking office.

He's committed to overseeing 100 million vaccine doses administered in his first 100 days, and has since said: "I think we may be able to get that to 1.5 million a day, rather than one million a day."

So how slow was the rollout under the Trump administration?

First target missed
As of 20 January, the day Mr Biden became president, about 16.5 million vaccines had been administered in the US, according to official statistics.

When you look at the countries doing the most vaccinations by population, the US is fourth after Israel, the UAE and the UK in terms of doses per 100 people.

Vaccine comparison
However, the US fell far short of the target set by the Trump administration to vaccinate 20 million people by the end of 2020.

By 31 December, fewer than three million had received one.

Moncef Slaoui, who had been leading the government's vaccine rollout plan, said at the time: "We know that it should be better, and we're working hard to make it better."

Mr Slaoui has since submitted his resignation at the request of President Biden.

Vaccinations have sped up considerably since the start of the year, more than doubling in Mr Trump's last week in office compared to the first week of January.

The US did achieve more than one million doses a day on a few occasions during the Trump administration.

The daily average for the week before Mr Trump left office was less than 900,000, according to Our World in Data, although there could be a slight lag in recording daily vaccination figures.

That figure has since risen above one million doses, and President Biden has said he's hopeful of achieving 1.5 million doses a day, but "we have to meet that goal of a million a day".

An uneven rollout
There are wide variations across different US states - for example, as of 20 January, Alaska had given out more than 9,000 doses per 100,000 people and Alabama less than 3,000.

Vaccine comparison
West Virginia has administered the second most vaccines per capita, with the state's governor calling it a "diamond in the rough".

It was the only state to opt out of a federal government programme through which large pharmacy chains vaccinated staff and residents in care homes (the first priority group) - and instead relied on local pharmacies, often with established links to care homes.

Mr Trump focused attention on what he saw as slow delivery by individual states, rather than issues at the federal level.

He tweeted on 29 December: "The Federal Government has distributed the vaccines to the states. Now it is up to the states to administer. Get moving!"

There have been issues around co-ordination and preparedness at state level, but local authorities have put this down to a lack of support from the federal government once the vaccines are distributed.

Why the slow start?
The US health system is complex, with a variety of services run by different providers within each state. These sometimes report to state or local officials but they can also operate independently.

This makes co-ordination challenging when trying to get supplies to local vaccination centres.

Dr Fauci, the president's top medical adviser, has said: "Whenever you take an undertaking of a magnitude of trying to vaccinate essentially most of the country, there's always going to be a bump in the road or a hiccup that we see."

There have also been distribution issues, such as in New York where officials have appealed for more supplies. Governors and mayors in other states have also complained of vaccine shortages.

President Biden's Chief of Staff, Ron Klain has said a plan to distribute vaccines "out into the community as a whole, did not really exist when we came into the White House".

US vaccine rollout
Experts say significant logistical problems have arisen as well in administering the vaccines once they have been delivered to states.

As of 20 January, more than 35 million vaccines had been distributed across the US, but less than half of these had been put into people's arms.

Public health professor at George Washington University, Dr Leana Wen said: "The federal government seemed to have ceded its responsibility at the point the vaccines were given to the states.

"The state and local health departments have been asking for months for additional funding, and have not been given the funding that they need," she added.

Local authorities have said this delay affected the setting up vaccine centres, and hiring staff to work in them.

Some feel a more targeted approach is needed, with the government providing funding to local authorities, depending on their needs.

A long-delayed pandemic aid package was eventually agreed by Congress at the end of December. It provided $8.75 billion to states to assist with vaccination efforts.

What will Biden do differently?
The Biden administration has set out a Covid action plan, which includes measures to facilitate the distribution of vaccines.

The president wants to increase state funding, calling for a $25 billion package for vaccination manufacturing and distribution. This will have to be approved by US lawmakers.

He's planning to open 100 federally funded vaccination sites, as well as mobile units to reach people in remote areas, staffing them with thousands of workers.

More pharmacies will also be used as vaccination sites, further expanding the pool of health professionals delivering vaccines.

And in a significant departure from the previous administration, Biden's team has proposed releasing all available vaccine doses as soon as they become available.

This is a controversial approach, as it potentially delays the availability of the second booster jab, but it's one that has been adopted by the UK government and others.

This highlights problems that have already arisen over vaccine production shortages, and there are proposals to address this, such as securing commitments for increased supply from the manufacturers, and possibly reducing the vaccine dosage.

President Biden has appointed a new Covid-19 response team to plan and orchestrate these measures.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-55721437
oralloy
 
  6  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 07:16 am
@neptuneblue,
neptuneblue wrote:
Covid-19: Was US vaccine rollout a 'dismal failure' under Trump?
By Jake Horton
BBC Reality Check

Not at all. All my friends and relatives over age 65 got vaccinations in January thanks to Mr. Trump.

Bad idea to trust hacks like the BBC, btw, as they have been busted for knowingly lying.
neptuneblue
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 07:31 am
So have you, but that certainly doesn't stop you from posting idiotic stuff.
oralloy
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 07:48 am
@neptuneblue,
It is dishonorable of you to lie about me and falsely accuse me of your own dishonesty.

You are also unable to provide any examples of me posting anything idiotic.
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  -4  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 08:45 am
Quote:
Democrats Shelve Minimum Wage Tax to Speed Work on Stimulus

Senate Democrats are jettisoning a proposal to use the tax code to penalize corporations that don’t raise the minimum wage for their lowest-paid workers in an effort to keep President Joe Biden’s broader stimulus plan on track for quick passage, according to two people familiar with the matter.

Democrats were left seeking alternatives after the Senate parliamentarian ruled Thursday that raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour as part of the $1.9 trillion pandemic relief legislation failed to qualify under fast-track budget rules that Democrats are using to pass the stimulus without Republican support.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden and Budget Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders proposed tax penalties on big companies that pay low wages along with incentives for smaller companies as an alternative. But it became clear over the weekend that getting all 50 Senate Democrats to agree on specific language would risk missing the March 14 deadline for extending expiring supplemental unemployment benefits, said one of the people, who spoke on condition of anonymity to describe private discussions.

The decision removes a major complication in the Senate and could speed approval of the rest of the package in the chamber. In addition to getting the backing of all 50 senators who caucus with Democrats, the tax language also would have had to pass muster with the parliamentarian, the House and the administration and be signed by Biden -- all in a two-week period.

Still, dropping the minimum wage increase from the stimulus could create other headaches for both Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

In the House, the stimulus legislation with the $15 an hour minimum wage narrowly passed on Saturday by 219 to 212, without any Republican support. Pelosi lost two moderate Democrats on that vote, and she can’t afford many more defections.

Pelosi said Friday she’s “absolutely” confident she could pass a stimulus bill without a minimum-wage provision in it, but that remains to be seen.

Nancy Pelosi on Feb. 26.

Photographer: Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg

Progressives in the chamber have made the minimum wage hike a signature issue as they angle to set the party’s future direction. Although there hasn’t been an explicit threat to scuttle the broader stimulus bill, which includes the extra unemployment benefits and $1,400 direct payments to many Americans, the conflict is bound to increase tension between the two wings of the party with Biden in the middle.

Progressive lawmakers on Monday sent Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris a letter organized by Representative Ro Khanna demanding that they set aside the parliamentarian’s ruling and include a minimum-wage increase in the Covid-19 relief package.

New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the leader of a group of young, vocal progressives, signed the letter and is among those urging Senate Democrats to get rid of a rule that gives the minority power to block most legislation.

“Really our options right now, at least our immediate options on this specific issue, is to do something about this parliamentary obstacle or abolish the filibuster,” she said on Friday.

The White House has said Vice President Kamala Harris, in her role as president of the Senate, won’t overrule the parliamentarian’s decision. And a few Democrats, including West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin, have said they are opposed to overturning Senate rules.

Expectations of the stimulus plan’s passage helped propel U.S. equities to record highs last month, and any major setbacks could unsettle investors. While some economic indicators have picked up, legislative delays would disrupt help going to millions of Americans still out of work thanks to the pandemic.

The last time Congress voted to increase the minimum wage was in 2007, when a measure phasing in a hike from $5.15 an hour to $7.25 was attached to a war funding bill by Pelosi and signed by President George W. Bush. Since then, many states have raised their wage standard above the federal minimum.

There are other possible avenues for Democrats to try, including attaching vetted language to Biden’s “Build Back Better” package later this year, which is also likely to move via the fast-track budget rules. Otherwise, they would need to find 10 Republicans to agree to advance a wage hike. Republicans blocked a $10.10 minimum wage in 2014.

Read more: Democrats Shelve Tax Penalty Aimed at Raising Minimum Wage

But even that may be a difficult road to take. Manchin said last week that he could back $11 an hour, phased in over two years and then indexed to inflation. Arizona Senator Kyrsten Sinema has also expressed opposition to increasing the wage to $15 an hour, but so far has not outlined what she would support. Montana Senator Jon Tester said he is in favor of a different phase-in, but thinks a compromise can be found.

Biden so far is hinting that it may be time to move on from the minimum-wage fight for now, given the urgency of the pandemic. Fighting for it once the economy is in better shape may make the increase an easier sell to pro-business moderates.

“We have no time to waste,” Biden said Saturday. “If we act now, decisively, quickly and boldly, we can finally get ahead of this virus, we can finally get our economy moving again.”

Close Biden ally Senator Chris Coons of Delaware on Sunday reinforced that message when asked about the nascent tax proposal.

“This isn’t the last bill we will adopt this year. There may be several other chances for us to move a minimum wage bill. But I look forward to hearing from Senators Sanders and Wyden this week,” he said on CNN.


Bloomberg

I agree with Biden, we will have other times to pass a needed minimum wage hike. We need to pass the stimulus bill now.
oralloy
 
  5  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 09:01 am
@revelette3,
It's hard to see what other opportunity for passing the bill is going to come up in the near future.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  -4  
Reply Mon 1 Mar, 2021 09:23 am
somebody wrote:
You are also unable to provide any examples of me posting anything idiotic.

There's this:
somebody previously wrote:
Don't be silly. Mr. Trump did far better at releasing the vaccines than Mr. Biden is doing.

Then this:
BBC Reality Check wrote:
However, the US fell far short of the target set by the Trump administration to vaccinate 20 million people by the end of 2020.
 

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