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Monitoring Biden and other Contemporary Events

 
 
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Tue 23 Nov, 2021 09:41 am
https://imageproxy.ifunny.co/crop:x-20,resize:640x,quality:90x75/images/6f7f006401a9b4e7500e005ba0d1c6745de4702088b3b26972ed44595017a247_1.jpg
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Nov, 2021 01:15 pm
From The Daily Poster:
In a last-ditch attempt to rescue Democrats from their own worst instincts, Sen. Bernie Sanders (Ind-Vt.) is working to try to limit the party’s politically toxic initiative to enrich wealthy property owners in liberal locales. If his maneuver fails, Republicans will have a potent political weapon heading into the 2022 midterms, as evidenced by a new video the GOP just released on Monday.

At issue is corporate Democrats’ proposal to raise the amount of state and local taxes (SALT) that can be deducted from households’ federal taxes. The $275 billion proposal is now the second largest part of the Build Back Better legislation, even though it would only benefit the 13 percent of Americans who itemize their tax returns.

For months, The Daily Poster’s reporting has warned that a repeal of the $10,000 cap on such deductions would be a massive tax cut for the super rich, including for key Democratic lawmakers who are championing the measure. The GOP has been hammering Democrats over the proposal, saying it proves Democrats are trying to help the wealthy. Their new video previews how Republicans will depict themselves as populist critics of regressive tax cuts ahead of the 2022 midterm elections, if Democrats pass their current SALT initiative.

But that’s where Sanders — a longtime critic of raising the SALT deduction cap — comes in.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2021 02:57 pm

https://iili.io/5r8vi7.jpg
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2021 11:24 pm
Rep. Greene was one of 21 Republicans who voted against awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to all the police officers who responded to the attack on the Capitol by a pro-Trump mob on Jan. 6.
Now, she had introduced a bill to award Congress’s highest honour to Kyle Rittenhouse, who fatally shot two men.
BillW
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Nov, 2021 11:26 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
She will one day get her due! She is a very nasty person.
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  4  
Reply Thu 25 Nov, 2021 03:15 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
She's doing what has become the standard facing position for modern Republicans - trolling liberals. "Boy, this will make their heads explode!"

Past the standard line of "government is evil", this is pretty much all they have. Policies for betterment of citizens? That's absent and of no interest.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  4  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 05:25 am
America's democracy is failing — and the world knows it

Where does America turn when its democracy is in distress?

Quote:
A number of non-governmental organizations that have long worked to rebuild communities in countries beset by violent and intractable conflicts — places that have collapsed under the weight of mass atrocities, political assassinations, authoritarian take overs, and widespread citizen violence — have shifted focus to a new subject: The United States.

At this moment, our country is in great need of lessons on what it takes to restore crumbling political systems. This week, the United States was added to a list of “backsliding” democracies in an annual report on the global state of democracy, marking a serious decline in international observers’ assessments of our political stability.

In naming the U.S. to the list for the first time, the report’s authors — Sweden’s International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA) — pointed to the “visible deterioration of democracy” in the United States on several criteria, including unwillingness to accept credible election results, voter participation suppression efforts, increasing polarization, and declines in civil liberties.

For a country that has long thought of itself as a beacon of democracy, this is a wake-up call.

There are a lot of different ways that democracies can fail. Some collapse under the weight of political leaders who assume authoritarian control, arrest opponents, or refuse to allow new elections to take place. Others suffer at the hands of citizens who support political violence, dehumanize other political parties as “evil,” or call for civil war. Still others struggle with voter suppression and intimidation efforts, weakened trust in institutions, and falling political participation.

The U.S. is facing all these problems, and more. We are witnessing challenges to the integrity of elections, rooted in disinformation spread by our own elected officials and in widespread conspiracies that circulate online. A third of election poll workers reported feeling unsafe this year, after an “unprecedented” number of them received threats. The violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 came at the hands of thousands of ordinary citizens who aimed to disrupt the democratic certification of the presidential election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.

We also face rising harassment and violence from extremist groups, citizen vigilantes, and unlawful militias who threaten minority groups, disrupt our freedom of assembly and demonstration with shows of violent force, and violate civil rights like the right to “public accommodations,” as recent court rulings have shown. We have seen repeated violent attacks, harassment, and even death threats directed at front-line workers and public officials, including school board members, health care workers, teachers, flight attendants, and restaurant hostesses.

The U.S. isn’t the only democracy that is eroding. Democratic stability is backsliding across the globe, as nations suffer from compromised elections, dismantled checks on government, challenges to a free media, and reductions of minority protections. But there is a particular urgency in the U.S. warning signs, not least because we are a nation of citizens who are now armed at previously unimaginable levels. This year is on track to be the second-highest year of firearm sales in history, following a “record shattering” year in 2020, in which 21 million background checks for firearms sales took place — far above the average of about 8.6 million annual checks.

Luckily, just because a democracy is in crisis does not mean it will collapse. On average, it takes about a decade from the onset of democratic backsliding to end in either democratic breakdown or recovery. But we are long overdue for a course correction.

Aside from international NGOs focusing on fixing America’s democracy, we can learn from the experiences of foreign governments throughout history, too. Germany’s post-World War II efforts to strengthen democracy include a wide variety of investments that simultaneously tackle right-wing extremism, racism, and antisemitism. South Africa built a national Truth and Reconciliation Commission to address the atrocities of apartheid and provide a path to restorative justice and healing.

These cases demonstrate that it is possible — with sustained educational, national, and community investments — to create more informed citizens, restore trust across dividing lines, energize youth engagement, and reduce political violence. Doing so requires significant educational and media literacy programming. It requires engagement across sectors, through partnerships with civil society, the tech and media sector, local governments, and faith communities. Ultimately, restoring democracy requires creating a nation in which every citizen and resident feels part of a shared community in which they have a voice and a path to a common future.

We are a long way from that kind of shared community. And in the end, saving our own democracy will require more than the efforts of a few committed citizens. The kind of effort we need to turn our backsliding democracy around cannot be done if the federal government doesn’t lead the charge with serious resource investments.

At its heart, this work is about resilience, rooted in an understanding that democracies must be nurtured through education and not just defended with force. After the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the U.S. made unprecedented investments in our security infrastructure. We created an entire new agency — the U.S. Department of Homeland Security — whose mission is to “secure the nation from the many threats we face.” But now, the call is coming from inside the house: the biggest threats to our nation are ones we’ve created ourselves.

msnbc/miller-idriss
Below viewing threshold (view)
bulmabriefs144
 
  -4  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 08:52 am
Also, how do you upvote threads. This has been hidden.
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 08:59 am
@bulmabriefs144,

it's a temporary bug.

the thumbs are in the exact same place as always, just invisible...
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 09:05 am
@bulmabriefs144,
I don't ordinarily champion Biden because I know his administration barely beats being Republican, but I believe the answer is not electing Republicans to replace him, but aggressively pursuing the voter's rights act and getting around the filibuster. Weaning the military of its bloated spending habits. Being progressive rather than merely liberal.
hightor
 
  5  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 09:05 am
@bulmabriefs144,
What does your inaccurate economic analysis have to do with the erosion of democracy? You're just pulling meaningless factoids out of the air and trying to make a case while actual conditions are already being addressed. The fact that you think tar sands oil should even be considered as an energy source,along with your predictable "covid is just the flu" line shows how out of touch you are with reality.

This is the problem the article was addressing which you ignored and tried to change the subject:

Quote:
We are witnessing challenges to the integrity of elections, rooted in disinformation spread by our own elected officials and in widespread conspiracies that circulate online. A third of election poll workers reported feeling unsafe this year, after an “unprecedented” number of them received threats. The violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 came at the hands of thousands of ordinary citizens who aimed to disrupt the democratic certification of the presidential election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.

We also face rising harassment and violence from extremist groups, citizen vigilantes, and unlawful militias who threaten minority groups, disrupt our freedom of assembly and demonstration with shows of violent force, and violate civil rights like the right to “public accommodations,” as recent court rulings have shown. We have seen repeated violent attacks, harassment, and even death threats directed at front-line workers and public officials, including school board members, health care workers, teachers, flight attendants, and restaurant hostesses.




0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  3  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 09:13 am
@bulmabriefs144,
blithering idiocy
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 09:23 am
@MontereyJack,
MontereyJack wrote:

blithering idiocy


To call what Bulma writes "blithering idiocy"...is giving him too much credit. Bulma IS a blithering idiot...who doesn't manage to live up to that standard.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 10:33 am
@edgarblythe,
+1,000,000,000.

I had no trouble voting for Joe Biden: none. But I might have had a better choice if everyone eligible to vote were not being actively suppressed.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  4  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 01:35 pm
Joe Biden has his faults,. But an accurate assessment of what has happened economically in this country on his watch has to include a couple of very positive items:
- Over 5.5 million jobs created in ten months
- The most recent tally showed the lowest number of unemployment claims in 52 years
- All that has happened EVEN BEFORE the historic-scale Infrastructure and "build back better" packages take effect.
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 01:40 pm
@snood,
snood wrote:

Joe Biden has his faults,.


Donald Trump has nothing but faults. Honestly I've been trying to think of anything positive to say about him and I can't think of a single thing.

Unless you count appealing to slobbering inbred White supremacist scumbag voters as a good thing.
roger
 
  4  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 06:13 pm
@izzythepush,
I voted for Bided because he wasn't Trump. Not really happy with him, but he still isn't Trump
BillW
 
  3  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 07:14 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

I voted for Bided because he wasn't Trump. Not really happy with him, but he still isn't Trump

roger, I just have one thing to say - if trump had of won, especially by stealing the election - I have no doubt the economy would now be in shabbles, Covid would be unrestrained, and we would probably have a new plutocracy style government with little or no freedom of speech or to retain our own weapons; we would be in total darkness....

Thank you for doing the right thing!
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Fri 26 Nov, 2021 08:09 pm
Biden is the logical choice against a madman like Trump. But that's no excuse to be satisfied with a sub-par performance from Biden. If nobody holds his feet to the fire we will not get voters' rights and a whole raft of other things needed to keep wolves like Trump away.
0 Replies
 
 

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