22
   

Monitoring Biden and other Contemporary Events

 
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 03:45 am
@Builder,

and you're ignoring the fact that we're eighteen months into a global pandemic that has killed 4.5 million people.

the vaccines are free and safe, unlike you're #CovidCocktail
Builder
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 03:52 am
@Region Philbis,
An American dies every 37 seconds from CVD. Kindly explain how India has 300 deaths per million, and the US of A has 2000 deaths per million.
Builder
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 04:10 am
https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

You folks don't seem to want to know about facts.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 04:18 am
@Builder,
Quote:
Kindly explain how India has 300 deaths per million, and the US of A has 2000 deaths per million.

Why does that need to be explained to you?

https://ars.els-cdn.com/content/image/1-s2.0-S0735109718346643-fx1.jpg

Builder
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 04:24 am
@hightor,
Quote:
Why does that need to be explained to you?


Because your little picture didn't explain Jack Shite.

















hightor
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 04:31 am
@Builder,
Quote:
Because your little picture didn't explain Jack Shite.


Don't you know how to read graphs?

Quote:
NEW DELHI: The death rate due to cardiac diseases has declined significantly in the US in the last 15 years even as it continues to rise in India with cardiovascular diseases being the leading cause of death, underlining the need for the country to adopt population-level strategies to reduce risk factors.
The death rate due to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) declined by a significant 41 per cent in the US between 1990 and 2016, whereas in India it rose by around 34 per cent from 155.7 to 209.1 deaths per one lakh population in the same period, says a new international study published by Elsevier in the Journal of the American College Of Cardiology.


You folks don't seem to want to know about facts.

Builder
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 04:50 am
@hightor,
Quote:
Don't you know how to read graphs?


don't you know how to post links?
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 04:55 am
@Builder,
Quote:

don't you know how to post links?


Yeah, I actually do. Don't you know how to do an internet search?
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 05:12 am
I just watched an interview with this doctor that wrote an editorial about how to talk to the “vaccine hesitant”.
The interviewer asked, “So, what do you say to people who are still resistant to getting the vaccine?”
His actual answer that he looked right into the camera and said right out of his mouth was, “Well, it’s not what we say to them, it’s what we hear.”

I think he’s saying that the way to get more of these ass-backwards flag-toting meatheads to take the free, safe, proven-effective vaccine is to be empathetic as they spout their idiocy.

I’d much rather back over them with a tractor.

But that’s just me.
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 05:27 am
@snood,
But...but...but snood, what about our freedoms?
snood
 
  3  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 06:02 am
@hightor,
I would make sure the horn beeped as I backed up.

They would be free to try to get out of the way.

0 Replies
 
Builder
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 05:46 pm
@hightor,
0 Replies
 
goldberg
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 06:20 pm
@Builder,
Fox News just reported that Biden " would be implementing a mandate for companies with more than 100 employees to require them to take the vaccine or else submit to weekly testing, declaring that it was "not about freedom or personal choice."

Stephanie Ruhle, who works for MSNBC, even said "you can work from home, you can home school your children, you can shop online" if you don't want to get the jab.

What's next? You will be ejected if you don't vote for progressives?
0 Replies
 
goldberg
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 06:28 pm
Progressives just berate anyone refusing to be cowed into submission . At this rate, they are going to indict their political foes and dissidents just like what Putin and his patsies would do in Russia or other nations.

Builder
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2021 06:55 pm
@goldberg,
When the segregation happens, then it will become obvious that the injections are a failure, and they won't be able to blame those who are choosing to not be part of the experiment.
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Tue 14 Sep, 2021 06:19 am
George W. Bush 2021, Meet George W. Bush 2001

Quote:
You can draw a straight line from the “war on terror” to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, from the state of exception that gave us mass surveillance, indefinite detention, extraordinary rendition and “enhanced interrogation” to the insurrectionist conviction that the only way to save America is to subvert it.

Or, as the journalist Spencer Ackerman writes in “Reign of Terror: How the 9/11 Era Destabilized America and Produced Trump,” “A war that never defined its enemy became an opportunity for the so-called MAGA coalition of white Americans to merge their grievances in an atmosphere of righteous emergency.” That impulse, he continues, “unlocked a panoply of authoritarian possibilities that extended far beyond the War on Terror, from stealing children to inciting a violent mob that attempted to overturn a presidential election.”

The “war on terror” eroded the institutions of American democracy and fed our most reactionary impulses. It set the stage for a new political movement with an old idea: that some Americans belong and some don’t; that some are “real” and some are not; that the people who are entitled to rule are a narrow, exclusive group.

It is with all of this in mind that I found it galling to watch George W. Bush speak on Saturday.

The former president helped commemorate the 20th anniversary of Sept. 11 with a speech in Shanksville, Pa., at a memorial service for the victims of Flight 93. He eulogized the dead, praised the heroism of the passengers and crew, and hailed the unity of the American people in the weeks and months after the attacks. He also spoke to recent events, condemning extremists and extremism at home and abroad.

“We have seen growing evidence that the dangers to our country can come not only across borders, but from violence that gathers within,” Bush said. “There is little cultural overlap between violent extremists abroad and violent extremists at home. But in their disdain for pluralism, in their disregard for human life, in their determination to defile national symbols, they are children of the same foul spirit. And it is our continuing duty to confront them.”

From there, Bush voiced his dismay at the stark polarization and rigid partisanship of modern American politics. “A malign force seems at work in our common life that turns every disagreement into an argument, and every argument into a clash of cultures,” he said. “So much of our politics has become a naked appeal to anger, fear, and resentment. That leaves us worried about our nation and our future together.”

Bush spoke as if he were just an observer, a concerned elder statesman who fears for the future of his country. But that’s nonsense. Bush was an active participant in the politics he now bemoans.

In 2002, Bush said that the Senate, then controlled by Democrats, was “not interested in the security of the American people.” In 2004, he made his opposition to same-sex marriage a centerpiece of his campaign, weaponizing anti-gay prejudice to mobilize his conservative supporters. Ahead of the 2006 midterm elections, he denounced the Democratic Party as “soft” on terrorism and unable to defend the United States.

And this is to say nothing of his allies in the conservative media, who treated disagreement over his wars and counterterrorism policies as tantamount to treason. Nor did his Republican Party hesitate to smear critics as disloyal or worse. “Some people are now attacking the president for attacking the terrorists,” stated the Republican National Committee’s first ad of the 2004 presidential election.

Bush was noteworthy for the partisanship of his White House and the ruthlessness of his political tactics, for using the politics of fear to pound his opponents into submission. For turning, as he put it on Saturday, “every disagreement into an argument, and every argument into a clash of cultures.”

Bush won some praise on Saturday. A typical response came from Michael Beschloss, a presidential historian and frequent fixture of cable news, who said it was an “important speech.”

It is frankly maddening to see anyone treat the former president as if he has the moral authority to speak on extremism, division and the crises facing our democracy. His critique of the Trump movement is not wrong, but it is fatally undermined by his own conduct in office.

In his eight years as president, George W. Bush launched two destructive wars (including one on the basis of outright lies), embraced torture, radically expanded the power of the national security state and defended all of it by dividing the public into two camps. You were either with him or you were against him.

As much as he has been rehabilitated in the eyes of many Americans — as much as his defenders might want to separate him and his administration from Donald Trump — the truth is that Bush is one of the leading architects of our present crisis. We may not be able to hold him accountable, but we certainly shouldn’t forget his starring role in making this country more damaged and dysfunctional than it ought to be.

nyt/bouie
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Sep, 2021 06:29 am
Thank you, Jamelle Bouie.
For some reason there seems to be a need for some on the left to retroactively sanitize George W’s image.
This piece says very well why it’s an image whose smudges don’t wipe clean that easily.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Sep, 2021 02:28 am
Listening to people oohing and aahing over these blockbuster supposed revelations in the new Woodward/Costas Book, ‘Peril’…

I can’t help but wonder (and wonder why no one else seems to question) about how the hell they got all the detailed, verbatim conversations.

They quote this long conversation between Dan Quale and Mike Pence, for instance. Supposedly a private, very heated exchange between the two VPs (one was an ‘ex’ at that time) where Quale talks Pence out of doing Trump’s bidding on 1/6.

I’m thinking no one questions the veracity because of the “legendary journalist“ status.

But Pence and Quale were supposedly alone.
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Sep, 2021 04:38 am
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E9Cn_5iWQAESMVZ?format=jpg&name=small
greyignes
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  0  
Reply Wed 15 Sep, 2021 04:42 am
@snood,
Quote:
I’m thinking no one questions the veracity because of the “legendary journalist“ status.

That's part of it. But fleshing out the outlines of private conversations has become an accepted journalistic technique. If the participants really object to the characterizations of their remarks they usually let it be known.
 

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