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If you have a narcissistic, personality disordered fiance,..

 
 
Lash
 
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 07:47 pm
jog in this Atlanta suburb.

<Why couldn't she have just gone for a swim?>

Her keys, cash, credit cards and identification also were found in her home. Her fiance said she left with only her radio and the clothes she had on.

About 100 police officers took part in the search and brought out bloodhounds to help. They also searched a river nearby.

Police gave mixed signals about whether they believe Wilbanks, a hospital nurse, may have gotten cold feet four days before her wedding.

Maj. Don Woodruff said authorities did not believe Wilbanks was a runaway bride. But under questioning from reporters, Police Chief Randy Belcher later said: "It's a very real possibility she did get cold feet. I mean, how many husbands have gone out for a pack of cigarettes and not come back?"

Mason and Wilbanks were to be married Saturday in what was expected to be a big bash, with 600 invitations sent out and 14 bridesmaids and 14 groomsmen, said Mason's mother, Vicki.

"She was so in love. The wedding is huge. It's the talk of the town. Everybody knows her and was so excited," said Killie McCauley, who went to high school with Wilbanks and joined the search.

McCauley and other friends and relatives have told police Wilbanks seemed happy and was looking forward to the wedding.

Friends on Thursday gathered at the home Wilbanks shares with her fiance on a tree-lined street close to the town square. They brought food to share and hugged each other as police kept others at a distance.

McCauley described the former high school track runner and cheerleader as an "avid matchmater" who introduced McCauley to her future husband. She said Wilbanks was looking forward to a future that included children.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 6,919 • Replies: 104
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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 08:02 pm
The "runaway bride" crack was out of line.
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 06:28 am
Yeah.

I was wondering if they were trying to give the family some hope that she might be alive, but you're right. Too flip for a press release in this situation.

Latest I've heard: The cops have asked him for a lie detector, and as of last night, he hadn't decided whether or not he'd do it.

Looks guiltier.
0 Replies
 
rodeman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 07:58 am
Lash:
I know the husband/boyfriend is the first place we look. But is that a giant leap in this case??

The refusal (thus far) of the lie detector test is certainly cause for concern???
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 11:30 am
Yes. In a normal environment, it is a giant leap.

But, it is so close to other very similar crimes, and I think the likelihood is greater that she was murdered by her fiance than kidnapped, or killed by a random stranger.

Still. We'll see.

If I was innocent, they wouldn't even have to ask me to submit to a polygraph.
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Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 11:38 am
If they asked me, I might say no. It is a violation of my rights )IMO) and is not admissable in court so what's the point? If I know I'm telling the truth, why should I have to prove it? As the defendant, I do not carry the burden of proof. That's the prosecuters job.
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sozobe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 11:45 am
Plus they're notoriously unreliable. The guy's fiance just disappeared, not to mention he's a suspect, he's got to be pretty upset. Even if he is completely innocent, he could worry that his state of mind would negatively impact a lie detector test.
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Synonymph
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 11:58 am
If someone you love is missing and you had nothing to do with the disappearance, you should take a polygraph so the investigators don't waste time continuing to focus on you as a suspect and can keep all their available resources working to find the missing person. It's obviously the morally and ethically correct thing to do.
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 12:18 pm
Thanks, synonymph. That's the real reason. Detectives have a pretty reliable pattern for solving this type of crime.

Sitting for a polygraph shows a much higher likelihood of innocence. They can piece together a profile by how a person responds to the request, and of course, the results.

I would be very suspicious of anyone who wouldn't cooperate in the investigation the disappearance of a loved one.
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Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 12:23 pm
Lash wrote:


Sitting for a polygraph shows a much higher likelihood of innocence. They can piece together a profile by how a person responds to the request, and of course, the results.



Unless you have the ability to beat a poly. Learn to control your blood pressure and heart rate and you can beat a poly.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 03:04 pm
True. There are some who can. The percentages are overwhelmingly against that--but you're right about the possibility.

Pathological liars... <skeery>
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2005 05:44 am
O

M

G

This one hasn't been boring.

First, let me say I'm glad she's alive.

Next, let me say her ass should be put in jail.

DrewDad-- It was cold feet.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2005 06:15 am
http://www.channeloklahoma.com/news/4434465/detail.html

Looks like it WAS cold feet.

Quote:
The wedding, which had been scheduled for Saturday, was elaborate. The couple had mailed 600 invitations, and the ceremony was to feature 14 bridesmaids and 14 groomsmen.


If that were me, I probably would have gone into hiding too. What a ridiculous thing to put a person through. Unless you are a movie star and eat up that kind of stuff, I could certainly understand why the pressure got to her.
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2005 06:18 am
She could have called it off.

She put people through sheer agony, and wasted a lot of manpower.

I think she's a bit on the mental side. And, she always looked like a deer in the headlights. Her eyes bugged out.

(Not that that bit of info is conducive to ...anything. But, it had to be said!)
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sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2005 08:04 am
And among the people she put through sheer agony was her fiance, who had to deal with being a suspect on top of his anguish, and who obviously wasn't quilty. (By the way we weren't saying he was innocent, we were saying that refusing the polygraph didn't really mean much.)

SO glad that she's safe.
0 Replies
 
Chrissee
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2005 10:46 am
Lash wrote:
Yes. In a normal environment, it is a giant leap.

But, it is so close to other very similar crimes, and I think the likelihood is greater that she was murdered by her fiance than kidnapped, or killed by a random stranger.

Still. We'll see.

If I was innocent, they wouldn't even have to ask me to submit to a polygraph.


You mean you wouldn't abide by the advice of your lawyer?
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2005 02:23 pm
If I was innocent, I'd take a polygraph test.

Soz-- I said he looked guiltier by refusing not to take it. He did to some people, including me. This time, though, the percentages didn't pan out.

Nothing is ever 100%.
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sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2005 02:48 pm
If I was innocent and extremely upset, I probably wouldn't take a polygraph.

One of many results from a Google search of "polygraph unreliable":

Quote:
Is there any evidence that the polygraph is really able to detect lies? The machine measures changes in blood pressure, breath rate, and respiration rate. When a person lies it is assumed that these physiological changes occur in such a way that a trained expert can detect whether the person is lying. Is there a scientific formula or law which establishes a regular correlation between such physiological changes and lying? No. Is there any scientific evidence that polygraph experts can detect lies using their machine at a significantly better rate than non-experts using other methods? No. There are no machines and no experts that can detect with a high degree of accuracy when people, selected randomly, are lying and when they are telling the truth.

Some people, such as Senator Orrin Hatch, don't trust the polygraph machine, even if used by an expert like Paul Minor who trained FBI agents in their use. Anita Hill passed a polygraph test administered by Minor who declared she was telling the truth about Clarence Thomas. Hatch declared that someone with a delusional disorder could pass the test if the liar really thought she was telling the truth. Hatch may be right, but the ability of sociopaths and the deluded to pass a polygraph test is not the reason such machines cannot accurately detect lies with accuracy any greater than other methods of lie detection.

The reason the polygraph is not a lie detector is that what it measures--changes in heartbeat, blood pressure, and respiration--can be caused by many things. Nervousness, anger, sadness, embarrassment, and fear can all be causal factors in altering one's heart rate, blood pressure, or respiration rate. Having to go to the bathroom can also be causative. There are also a number of medical conditions such as colds, headaches, constipation, or neurological and muscular problems which can cause the physiological changes measured by the polygraph. The claim that an expert can tell when the changes are due to a lie and when they are due to other factors has never been proven. Even if the device measures nervousness, one cannot be sure that the cause of the nervousness is fear of being caught in a lie. Some people may fear that the machine will indicate they are lying when they are telling the truth and that they will be falsely accused of lying. Furthermore, even the most ardent advocate of the polygraph must admit that liars can sometimes pass their tests. One need only remember the spy Aldrich Ames, who passed the polygraph test several times while with the CIA. This lesson was lost on the FBI, however, who started requiring polygraph tests of its employees after spy Robert Hanssen was caught. Heretofore, the FBI had only used the polygraph on suspected criminals. Apparently, the FBI thinks that they could have prevented Hanssen's betrayal if only he had been made to take the polygraph.

In California and many other states, the results of polygraph tests are inadmissible as evidence in a court of law. This may because polygraph tests are known to be unreliable, or it may be because what little benefit may be derived from using the polygraph is far outweighed by the potential for significant abuse by the police. The test can easily be used to invade a person's privacy or to issue a high-tech browbeating of suspects. Skeptics consider evidence from polygraphs no more reliable than testimony evoked under hypnosis, which is also not allowed in a court of law in California and many other states. Also, in 1998, the U.S. Supreme Court argued that Military Rule of Evidence 707, which makes polygraph evidence inadmissible in court-martial proceedings, does not unconstitutionally abridge the right of accused members of the military to present a defense (United States, Petitioner v. Edward G. Scheffer).


http://skepdic.com/polygrap.html
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Apr, 2005 03:53 pm
I can't imagine a circumstance where I would take a polygraph if I was innocent.

The only time I would take one is if I were guilty and thought I could pull a fast one. I am always suspicious of people who agree to a lie detector test.
0 Replies
 
Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2005 02:35 pm
Cold Feet in Hot Water?


By CHARLES ODUM
DULUTH, Ga. (AP) - A jilted groom and a town full of puzzled friends and relatives may not be all that Jennifer Wilbanks faces, as authorities weighed the evidence and the legal issues on Monday to determine whether she should be charged with a crime.

Gwinnett County District Attorney Danny Porter promised to look into whether Wilbanks, 32, violated the law by falsely reporting a crime.

Wilbanks, who had vanished Tuesday after saying she was going out jogging, initially told authorities she was abducted. But she later admitted she took a cross-country bus trip to Las Vegas, Nev., to avoid her lavish, 600-guest wedding, which had been set for Saturday, and then went on to Albuquerque, N.M.

Link
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