10
   

Tuesday the 6th of November is MIDTERM ELECTIONS!

 
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 09:20 pm
Republicans pick up North Dakota.

https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/414121-cramer-ousts-heitkamp-in-critical-north-dakota-senate-race

That was expected. But the Democrats needed to hold it if they wanted to take the Senate.
0 Replies
 
maporsche
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 09:28 pm
Democrats projected to win the House.
Republicans projected to keep the Senate.

All is as projected.

The next two years should be interesting.
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2018 09:28 pm
The Republicans have held on to the Senate:
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/06/midterm-election-results-republicans-and-democrats-fight-for-senate-majority.html

The Democrats have captured the House:
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/06/midterm-election-results-democrats-and-republicans-fight-for-house-majority.html
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 07:36 am
@maporsche,
My takeaways before reading all the pundits

- The country is more polarized than I can ever recall. We aren't going to see a lot of statewide Democrats in red states or statewide Republicans in blue states anymore. This will give a structural advantage to Republicans in the Senate since it was designed to give small states more leverage and most of the deep red states have small to very small populations.
- Lots of voters were mobilized, likely many for the first time. I see voting like charitable giving. There is some energy to overcome to do it the first time, but once you start, it is easy to keep going. I think the Democrats getting a strong turnout is a plus for future elections, especially in the House.
- District gerrymandering took a serious hit this time around. New districts in PA and VA resulted in significant Democratic gains and several states passed laws banning gerrymandering. That's a plus for the Democrats.

Other than that, it all pretty much came down the way the pundits expected it to. It will be interesting to see everyone spin it today.
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 07:51 am
@engineer,
Another comment and I don't know how widely this will apply to the rest of the country, but there was a huge local Democratic wave here. I live in a reddish purple area that has generally gone Republican. My county did not go for Obama either term, has no Democrats on the school board and has a majority Republican county commission. This election, the county board flipped to Democrat, the school board flipped to Democrat (from zero on there now) and our Republican state senator in a very highly gerrymandered district lost (by 87 votes!).
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 08:17 am
We have to end voter suppression, gerrymandering, electoral college. These alone will alter lots of outcomes in the future.
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 08:30 am
@edgarblythe,
and right after that we can make cats and dogs get along, end world poverty, and make everyone love anchovies.
0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 08:31 am
I think we’ll see more working together between Democrats and Republicans.

That is what the country wants in general, but it’s gojng to piss off the progressives.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 08:37 am
@maporsche,
Yep, If this serves as nothing but a lesson in how to play with each other and lose all the rancor and badass politics first attitudes it may work.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 08:38 am
@maporsche,
maporsche wrote:

I think we’ll see more working together between Democrats and Republicans.

That is what the country wants in general, but it’s gojng to piss off the progressives.

You remember the great bipartisan compromises in the past like...
Don't ask, don't tell
and

the Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act (GLBA),
"The act repealed a provision of the Glass–Steagall Act that had required banks to either classify themselves as either commercial bank, which were subject to federal oversight and protections like deposit insurance, or as investment banks, which faced less regulations but did not benefit from federal protections."
?
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 08:44 am
@tsarstepan,
Well, if far-left partinship wins and democrats don’t accept any compromises on any legislation then I won’t expect you to complain about any of that.

Compromise is evil and wrong. Check.



Probably 80% of the country wants to see R and D to work together more (fix government and work for the people). But they’re wrong and you’ll be happy if nothing gets done.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 10:03 am
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:

maporsche wrote:

I think we’ll see more working together between Democrats and Republicans.

That is what the country wants in general, but it’s gojng to piss off the progressives.

You remember the great bipartisan compromises in the past like...
Don't ask, don't tell
and

the Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act (GLBA),
"The act repealed a provision of the Glass–Steagall Act that had requir
ed banks to either classify themselves as either commercial bank, which were subject to federal oversight and protections like deposit insurance, or as investment banks, which faced less regulations but did not benefit from federal protections."
?


Damn straight.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 10:29 am
@maporsche,
maporsche wrote:

Compromise is evil and wrong. Check.

That's a bloody stretch in what I said. I just don't trust the establishment Democrats to not place themselves in a political coma. What you're insinuating is compromise ISN'T compromise. Compromise takes at least two parties. Not one party slavishly rubber stamping the other's agenda... because they don't know how to effectively make what a true compromise should be.
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 11:14 am
@tsarstepan,
You don’t think the Republicans viewed what was passed as a compromise?

You think DADT was exactly what Republicans wanted? I don’t. I think they wanted no gays in the military at all ever.

You think the bank bill that was passed wasn’t a compromise from Republicans point of view? I think they’d repeal the whole of Dodd Frank.


These both were compromises.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 11:18 am
@maporsche,
After hearing #45 blather today I'm already pissed off.
engineer
 
  4  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 03:05 pm
Interesting factiod, in my county early voting accounted for 50,000 of the total 80,000 votes, 63%.
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Nov, 2018 06:58 pm
@engineer,
In my precinct (a vry rural area), The under 30 voters were a HUUUUGE presence and from the returns in the papers , Its obvious that there was a whole lot of strait ticket voting on both sides
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2018 08:57 am
Exit polling results: https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/11/trump-house-midterms-exit-poll-takeaways.html

Condensed quotes below:

Quote:
1. President Trump cost Republicans the House. The GOP won handily among people who said Trump wasn’t a factor in their votes. What gave Democrats their majority was a victory margin of 15 to 20 percentage points among people who cited Trump as a factor.

2. Brett Kavanaugh hurt Republicans. Those who supported Kavanaugh voted overwhelmingly for Republicans, but those who opposed Kavanaugh voted even more overwhelmingly for Democrats. In the AP/Fox poll, Republicans won among the 25 percent of people who said the Kavanaugh debate wasn’t important to their vote. But among people who said Kavanaugh was somewhat important, Republicans lost narrowly. And among voters who said Kavanaugh was very important—nearly half the electorate—the GOP lost by 13 percentage points.

3. #MeToo didn’t help Democrats much. In the AP/Fox survey, 78 percent of voters said they were concerned about women not being believed in sexual misconduct cases. Forty-three percent said they were very concerned. But these numbers were almost matched by the 74 percent who said they were concerned—and the 38 percent who said they were very concerned—about accused men not getting a chance to defend themselves.

4. The gun issue hurt Republicans. In the network poll, 59 percent of voters supported stricter gun control; only 37 percent opposed it. When people were asked which of four issues was most important to their vote, 10 percent named gun policy, and Democrats won these voters, 70 percent to 29 percent.

5. Violence hurt Republicans, but not much. In the AP/Fox survey, most voters said that Republicans tend to talk about politics in ways that lead to violence, and most voters said that Democrats don’t tend to talk that way. But the difference was surprisingly small. In the network survey, Republicans lost big among the 23 percent of voters who said “recent extremist violence” was the top factor in their vote. But half the electorate said the recent violence was only one important factor, and Republicans came close to splitting that bloc.

6. Russia fizzled. In the AP/Fox poll, voters were closely divided on whether Trump’s campaign coordinated with the Russian government in 2016. Forty-eight percent said yes; 50 percent said no. But Republicans seem to have persuaded many people to distrust special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. In the network poll, a narrow plurality, 46 percent to 41 percent, disapproved of the way Mueller has handled the investigation.

7. Voters don’t share Trump’s hard line on immigration. In the network poll, 46 percent of voters said Trump’s immigration policies were too tough; only 17 percent said they weren’t tough enough. In the AP/Fox poll, a narrow majority, 52 percent to 47 percent, opposed a border wall. When voters were asked whether immigrants living in the United States illegally should be deported or offered a chance to apply for legal status, 69 percent chose legal status. And while 39 percent of voters said that immigrants hurt the country more than they help it, 59 percent said the opposite: that immigrants help more than they hurt.

8. The problem for Democrats on race is complacency, not hate. Most Americans don’t agree with white nationalists or with Republican politicians who hype voter fraud. By a margin of 53 percent to 36 percent, voters said they were more concerned that people might be unfairly prevented from voting than that some people might vote illegitimately. In both polls, more than 40 percent of voters said that society favors whites over minorities; fewer than 20 percent said that society favors minorities over whites. But roughly a third of voters said that society doesn’t favor any race, and these voters went Republican by more than 2 to 1.

9. The economy cuts both ways. In both surveys, two-thirds of voters said the economy was excellent or good, and these people voted decisively for Republicans. But when the question was framed in personal terms—whether your family is doing better or worse financially—most voters said they were only holding steady or losing ground, and these people voted decisively for Democrats.

Going into the election, some Republicans wondered why Trump was working so hard to stir up fear and anger about immigration. They thought he should run a more upbeat campaign focusing on the economy. The exit polls suggest that Trump’s decision may have been smart. Among voters who named the economy as their top issue, Republicans won by 20 to 30 points. But among those who named immigration as their top issue, Republicans won by 50 to 60 points. By focusing attention on immigration, and by appealing to voters who cared about that issue, Trump may have done more to boost the GOP’s margins than he would have by running on the economy.
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2018 09:03 am
@engineer,
Interesting numbers.

Where'd that caravan go in the last couple of days? did they stop walking?
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -3  
Reply Thu 8 Nov, 2018 11:14 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:
We have to end voter suppression,
The only votes that are being suppressed are the Democrats' attempts at cheating. We will never stop trying to prevent Democrats from cheating.

edgarblythe wrote:
electoral college.
So the Democrats can rig local issues in big cities to drive turnout and overwhelm the will of the rest of the country? Never!
 

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